AP Literature

February 12-16

Monday

juanfelipeherrera2 

 

 

 

 

Today. The Age of Innocence Chapters 27-29.

The Road essay revisions read, graded, and commented on. See yours at turnitin.

Tonight. Read The Age of Innocence Chapters 30-31. Read for yourself but also prepare thoughts, passages, challenges to the discussion questions for your section posted here.

Be sure to respond to peergrade feedback for 2-9-18 In-class prose analysis by 8:00 tomorrow. That's 8am.

Ongoing. Thursday, February 22. In-class Question 3 (thematic) essay on The Age of Innocence.

 

 

Tuesday

wislawaszymborska3 

 

 

 

 

Today. The Age of Innocence Chapters 21-23.

Tonight. Carefully and more fully read the Smollett passage you wrote about last week. Identify concrete literary elements in each ¶ and define a stronger fti re prompt. Be sure to address the whole prompt. Here's the passage if you need it.

Ongoing. Thursday, February 22. In-class Question 3 (thematic) essay on The Age of Innocence.

 

 

Wednesday

charlessimic2 

 

 

 

 

Today. Smollet passage. Prose analysis.

Tonight. Read these essays about the Smollett passage you wrote on last Friday (link here). What scores would you give them and why? Here are some sample essays from our class. They're for your reference.

Ongoing. Thursday, February 22. In-class Question 3 (thematic) essay on The Age of Innocence.

 

 

Thursday

augustwilson2 

 

 

 

 

Today. Prose analysis, Smollet.

Tonight. Read The Age of Innocence Chapters 32-33. Read for yourself but also prepare thoughts, passages, challenges to the discussion questions for your section posted here.

Ongoing. Thursday, February 22. In-class Question 3 (thematic) essay on The Age of Innocence.

Tuesday, February 13 by 15:30 to 2-20-18, The Scarlet Letter prose analysis at turnitin and peergrade. Prose analysis found here. Practice defining a strong fti, focusing the essay, doing direct/full prose analysis. Keep the essay under 500 words. A 50-point essay.

 

Friday

cormacmccarthy2 

 

 

 

 

Today. Raffle holiday. No class.

Tonight.

Ongoing. Thursday, February 22. In-class Question 3 (thematic) essay on The Age of Innocence.

Tuesday, February 13 by 15:30 to 2-20-18, The Scarlet Letter prose analysis at turnitin and peergrade. Prose analysis found here. Practice defining a strong fti, focusing the essay, doing direct/full prose analysis. Keep the essay under 500 words. A 50-point essay.

The Age of Innocence
reading links

ageofinnocencecover1

Edith Wharton on writing fiction
Edith Wharton, Confessions of a novelist
Edith Wharton and the problem of sympathy
The New York social season
New York social customs
Madame X, Singer Sargent
Faust and The Age of Innocence
Waking up to Aliveness
The Age of Innocence vocabulary lists
List of The Age of Innocence reading questions
Discussion guidelines and schedule
 

 

The Age of Innocence
Francine Prose

"Edith Wharton wrote The Age of Innocence—to my mind, her greatest novel—in six months, between September 1919 and March 1920. She was writing about the world—Old New York—in which she had grown up, a world that had already vanished. But writing from a temporal and geographical distance, and through the magnifying lens of retrospect, she was able to enrich her portrait of a society and of a moment in time with everything she had learned and experienced since, with everything she knew about passion and obligation, about the perils of personal fear and social convention, about renunciation and regret, youth and age, memory and fantasy, anticipation and disappointment. America and Europe.     
      "Having read the novel, you can open it at random and be instantly returned to the enthralling if progressively more unhappy inner life of Newland Archer, married to one woman and infatuated with another. You can attend the choreographed dinners and lawn parties, ride in carriages and on ferries, and eavesdrop on seemingly straightforward conversations that conceal—that barely conceal—layers of nuance, subtext, unspoken longing, suppressed declarations of love and overt demarcations of territory. We get to know the characters so well that we know instantly how each major figure is responding to a bit of new information or a changed view of the situation. After a while the author no longer needs to tell us.
     "No one has written more incisively not just about a historical period and a particular social milieu but about something more timeless—the ardor with which we flee and return to the prison of conditioning and convenience. Wharton's graceful sentences create dramatic, populous tableaux and peel back layer after layer of artifice and pretense, of what we say and how we wish to appear, revealing the hidden kernel of what human beings are like, alone and together."

 

 

The Iluminating incident
Edith Wharton

writingoffictionwhartoncover"At every stage in the progress of his tale the novelist must rely on what may be called the illuminating incident to reveal and emphasize the inner meaning of each situation. Illuminating incidents are the magic casements of fiction, its vistas on infinity. They are also the most personal element in any narrative, the author's most direct contribution; and nothing gives such immediate proof of the quality of his imagination--and therefore of the richness of his temperament--as his choices of such episodes....At the conclusion of a novel the illuminating incident need only send its ray backward; but it should send a long enough shaft to meet the light cast forward from the first page....The illuminating incident is not only the proof of the novelist's imaginative sensibility; it is also the best means of giving presentness, immediacy, to his tale."
     "nothing shows the quality of the novelist's imagination more clearly than the incidents he singles out to illuminate the course of events and the inner workings of his people's souls."

Assignments due
read them in full

stephenkingworking1

 

Monday, February 12 during lunch. In-class prose analysis make up in 801.

Tuesday, February 13 by 8:00. Response to peergrade feedback for 2-9-18 In-class prose analysis.

Tuesday, February 13 by 15:30 to 2-20-18, The Scarlet Letter prose analysis at turnitin and peergrade. Prose analysis found here. Practice defining a strong fti, focusing the essay, doing direct/full prose analysis. Keep the essay under 500 words. A 50-point essay.

Thursday, February 22. In-class Question 3 (thematic) essay on The Age of Innocence. Though you cannot use your book, you are expected to cite concrete and detailed examples to support and develop your fti. Know novel's themes, characters. settings, plot, language, imagery, etc., well enough to discuss and analyze in detail. I suggest making a list of themes, some ways to focus each, and a list of supporting examples for each. Study them. You need to be prepared to think about the novel as prompt requires.

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight
LBH sentence crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Comma usage quick guide
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center
AP Q3 sample essays, Othello
Key AP prose analysis documents

 

 

The Age of Innocence
Robert McCrum

robertmccrum"As with all her New York novels, The Age of Innocence makes an ironic commentary on the cruelties and hypocrisies of Manhattan society in the years before, during and after the Great War. Strangely, when it won the 1921 Pulitzer prize, the judges praised it for revealing 'the wholesome atmosphere of American life and the highest standard of American manners and manhood.' Today, while not as merciless in its analysis as The House of Mirth, Wharton's late masterpiece stands as a fierce indictment of a society estranged from culture and in desperate need of a European sensibility. This had been an issue for American writers since Washington Irving, Melville and Hawthorne. Some critics would say it remains unresolved to this day."

 

 

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