AP Literature spring archive

April 16-20

Weekly calendar

 

Monday

juanfelipeherrera14 

 

 

 

 

Today. Othello 3.1-3.3.173.

 

Tonight. Read Othello 3.3.174-292, page 117. Read for drama first, using left-page guides.
     Track Iago's influence on Othello and the changes in Othello. Specifically track. Define how Iago works and why he is so effective. Why does Othello belive Iago? Why does he doubt Desdemona? What makes this scene so brilliantly amazing and moving?

For those of you looking to get a jump on Spring essay revisions, see the grading notes doc inside the grading notes folder linked under Writing documents in middle column. The principles of revision apply to you all. Essays should post at turnitin next Monday, maybe as early as this Friday. You will all want to read my notes and the docs about revision. We'll spend some class time talking about revision and looking at some sample essays.

 

Ongoing. Monday, April 30 by 15:30. Final draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-30-18, Much Ado FINAL.

Preparation for AP exam. You want a few full length novels or plays of literary merit at hand for the exam, to ensure a successful Q 3. You need to know those works in detail so you can make specific references to evidence you analyze. From memory.

You might also be choosing at least one passage in every night's reading to do some prose/poetry analysis on, to keep your mind fresh and practised for Q 1 and Q 2. Review the key prose and poetry docs linked beneath Essay documents in the middle column. You need the vocabulary of the discipline ready and usable.

 

 

Tuesday

wislawaszymborska14 

 

 

 

 

Today. Othello 3.3.174-292.

 

Tonight. Read Othello 3.3.293-480, end of 3.3. Read for drama first, using the left-page guides. Keep tracking Iago's working on Othello and Othello's changes. How does the play show us those changes? How is the scene tragic? Come with some thoughts.

 

Ongoing. Monday, April 30 by 15:30. Final draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-30-18, Much Ado FINAL.

Keep preparing for the AP exam. Suggestions listed in Monday's ongoing section.

 

 

Wednesday

charlessimic14 

 

 

 

 

Today. Othello 3.3.293-480. Tragedy.

 

Tonight. Read Othello 3.4. Read for drama first, using the left-page guides. How does Othello's relationship with Desdemona change? What do we learn about Desdemona's relationship with Emilia?

 

Ongoing. Monday, April 30 by 15:30. Final draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-30-18, Much Ado FINAL.

Keep preparing for the AP exam. Suggestions listed in Monday's ongoing section.

 

 

Thursday

augustwilson14 

 

 

 

 

Today. Othello 3.4

 

Tonight.

 

Ongoing. Monday, April 30 by 15:30. Final draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-30-18, Much Ado FINAL.

Keep preparing for the AP exam. Suggestions listed in Monday's ongoing section.

 

Friday

cormacmccarthy14 

 

 

 

 

Today. Field Day. No classes.

 

Tonight. Read through your draft Much Ado final essay and my comments. Monday, we'll talk about revision and look at some sample essays.

Read Trimble, Writing with Style Chapter 10: Dramatizing Your Ideas; and Chapter 11: Revising. Differences between proofreading, editing, revising.

 

 

Ongoing. Monday, April 30 by 15:30. Final draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-30-18, Much Ado FINAL.

Keep preparing for the AP exam. Suggestions listed in Monday's ongoing section.

Othello
reading links

othelloposterntlive1

Tragedy basics, Aristotle
Tragedy by David Mikics
Scene-by-scene summary
Othello, introduction from RSC
Structure of tragedy
General Jonathan Shaw on Othello
Othello, RSC 2015, a production to watch

 



Iago and Othello

 

 

Emilia and Desdemona

 

 

Staging the brawl in 2.3

 

 

How theater works
The National Theater

 

 

Othello as tragedy
William Hazlitt

pxWilliamHazlittselfportrait1 "It has been said that tragedy purifies the affections by terror and pity. That is, it substitutes imaginary sympathy for mere selfishness. It gives us a high and permanent interest, beyond ourselves, in humanity as such. It raises the great, the remote, and the possible to an equality with the real, the little and the near. It makes man a partaker with his kind. It subdues and softens the stubbornness of his will. It teaches him that there are and have been others like himself, by showing him as in a glass what they have felt, thought, and done. It opens the chambers of the human heart. It leaves nothing indifferent to us that can affect our common nature. It excites our sensibility by exhibiting the passions wound up to the utmost pitch by the power of imagination or the temptation of circumstances; and corrects their fatal excesses in ourselves by pointing to the greater extent of sufferings and of crimes to which they have led others. Tragedy creates a balance of the affections. It makes us thoughtful spectators in the lists of life. It is the refiner of the species; a discipline of humanity. The habitual study of poetry and works of imagination is one chief part of a well-grounded education. A taste for liberal art is necessary to complete the character of a gentleman, Science alone is hard and mechanical. It exercises the understanding upon things out of ourselves, while it leaves the affections unemployed, or engrossed with our own immediate, narrow interests.—OTHELLO furnishes an illustration of these remarks. It excites our sympathy in an extraordinary degree. The moral it conveys has a closer application to the concerns of human life than that of any other of Shakespeare's plays. 'It comes directly home to the bosoms and business of men.'" (more)

 

 

An Actor's 10 key questions

alancummingacting7

1. Who am I?
2. Where am I?
3. When is it?
4. Where have I just come from?
5. What do I want?
6. Why do I want it?
7. Why do I want it now?
8. What will happen if I don't get it now?
9. How will I get what I want by doing what?
10. What must I overcome? (full article here)
 

Assignments due
read them in full

stephenkingworking14

 

Final essay, spring 2018. See the assignment document for details (link here).

 

Revising the draft. See this doc from UNC and this one from Harvard. Excellent docs, both.

 

Monday, April 30 by 15:30. Final draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-30-18, Much Ado FINAL.

 

 

Extra- extra-credits

1) Choose a small section of Much Ado, no longer than three minutes in performance. Perform it for the class, complete with blocking. Let the classroom be your stage.

2) Write a version of the song in Act 2 and perform it for the class.

 

 

Writing documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight
LBH sentence crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Comma usage quick guide
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center
AP Q3 sample essays, Othello
Key AP prose analysis documents
Key AP poetry analysis documents

 

 

Othello at The National Theater

 

 

Actors on Othello

 

 

Consonants in a speech

 

 

Vowels in a speech

 

 

Using the verse

April 9-13

Weekly calendar

 

Monday

juanfelipeherrera13 

 

 

 

 

Today. Othello 1.1. Tragedy basics.

Spring final essay/exam DRAFT due by 15:30.

Much Ado About Nothing speech analysis essay opens today at 15:30. Review yours and my comments. Open the essay at turnitin; print "current view"; write my comments above/linked to eaach bubble; correct each mistake marked with an X. Due Friday. 100-point participation grade. Also see the grading notes and sample essays (link here). This is the last feedback you will receive on poetry/prose analysis before the AP exam.

 

Tonight. Read The language of Othello, pages 230-231; then Othello 1.2. Use left-page guides. Focus on drama first. Begin paying special attention to the play's language.

 

Ongoing. Monday, April 30 by 15:30. Final draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-30-18, Much Ado FINAL.

Preparation for AP exam. You want a few full length novels or plays of literary merit at hand for the exam, to ensure a successful Q 3. You need to know those works in detail so you can make specific references to evidence you analyze. From memory.

You might also be choosing at least one passage in every night's reading to do some prose/poetry analysis on, to keep your mind fresh and practised for Q 1 and Q 2. Review the key prose and poetry docs linked beneath Essay documents in the middle column. You need the vocabulary of the discipline ready and usable.

 

 

Tuesday

wislawaszymborska13 

 

 

 

 

Today. Othello 1.2.

Peergrade, 4-6-18, Much Ado About Nothing AP Q 3 essay due by 22:00. 100-point participation grade.

 

Tonight. Read Othello 1.3. Read for drama first, using the left-page guides.

 

Ongoing. Monday, April 30 by 15:30. Final draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-30-18, Much Ado FINAL.

Keep preparing for the AP exam. Suggestions listed in Monday's ongoing section.

 

 

 

Wednesday

charlessimic13 

 

 

 

 

Today. Othello 1.3.

 

Tonight. Read Othello 2.1-2.2. Read for drama first, using the left-page guides.

 

Ongoing. Monday, April 30 by 15:30. Final draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-30-18, Much Ado FINAL.

Keep preparing for the AP exam. Suggestions listed in Monday's ongoing section.

 

 

Thursday

augustwilson13 

 

 

 

 

Today. Othello 2.1-2.2. Beginning of Act 2.

 

Tonight. Othello 2.3. Read for drama first, using the left-page guides.

 

Ongoing. Monday, April 30 by 15:30. Final draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-30-18, Much Ado FINAL.

Keep preparing for the AP exam. Suggestions listed in Monday's ongoing section.

Much Ado speech analysis essay corrections due tomorrow.

 

 

Friday

cormacmccarthy13 

 

 

 

 

Today. Othello 2.3. End of Act 2.

Much Ado About Nothing speech analysis corrections due today.

 

 

Tonight. Read Othello 3.1-3.3.173, page 107. Read for drama first, using the left-page guides. This is the temptation scene. Iago begin to poison Othello's mind against Desdemona. He begins with "Ha! I like not that." Create a chart following Othello's movement from faith to doubt. Note the techniques Iago uses to persuade/influence Othello and why Othello is so susceptible to influence.

 

Ongoing. Monday, April 30 by 15:30. Final draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-30-18, Much Ado FINAL.

Keep preparing for the AP exam. Suggestions listed in Monday's ongoing section.

Othello
reading links

othelloposterntlive

Tragedy basics, Aristotle
Tragedy by David Mikics
Scene-by-scene summary
Othello, introduction from RSC
Structure of tragedy
General Jonathan Shaw on Othello
Othello, RSC 2015, a production to watch

 



Iago and Othello

 

 

Emilia and Desdemona

 

 

Staging the brawl in 2.3

 

 

How theater works
The National Theater

 

 

Othello as tragedy
William Hazlitt

pxWilliamHazlittselfportrait11 "It has been said that tragedy purifies the affections by terror and pity. That is, it substitutes imaginary sympathy for mere selfishness. It gives us a high and permanent interest, beyond ourselves, in humanity as such. It raises the great, the remote, and the possible to an equality with the real, the little and the near. It makes man a partaker with his kind. It subdues and softens the stubbornness of his will. It teaches him that there are and have been others like himself, by showing him as in a glass what they have felt, thought, and done. It opens the chambers of the human heart. It leaves nothing indifferent to us that can affect our common nature. It excites our sensibility by exhibiting the passions wound up to the utmost pitch by the power of imagination or the temptation of circumstances; and corrects their fatal excesses in ourselves by pointing to the greater extent of sufferings and of crimes to which they have led others. Tragedy creates a balance of the affections. It makes us thoughtful spectators in the lists of life. It is the refiner of the species; a discipline of humanity. The habitual study of poetry and works of imagination is one chief part of a well-grounded education. A taste for liberal art is necessary to complete the character of a gentleman, Science alone is hard and mechanical. It exercises the understanding upon things out of ourselves, while it leaves the affections unemployed, or engrossed with our own immediate, narrow interests.—OTHELLO furnishes an illustration of these remarks. It excites our sympathy in an extraordinary degree. The moral it conveys has a closer application to the concerns of human life than that of any other of Shakespeare's plays. 'It comes directly home to the bosoms and business of men.'" (more)

 

 

An Actor's 10 key questions

alancummingacting6

1. Who am I?
2. Where am I?
3. When is it?
4. Where have I just come from?
5. What do I want?
6. Why do I want it?
7. Why do I want it now?
8. What will happen if I don't get it now?
9. How will I get what I want by doing what?
10. What must I overcome? (full article here)

 

 

Honesty, Dan Ariely


 

Assignments due
read them in full

stephenkingworking13

 

Final essay, spring 2018. See the assignment document for details (link here).

 

Monday, April 9 by 15:30. First draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-9-18, Much Ado DRAFT. Think of this draft as the essay you would normally turn in. Think of it as a final draft.

 

Tuesday, April 10 by 22:00. Peergrade, 4-6-18, Much Ado About Nothing AP Q 3 essay. 100-point participation grade.

 

Friday, April 13 in class. 4-30-18, Much Ado About Nothing speech analysis written comments/corrections due in class.

 

Monday, April 30 by 15:30. Final draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-30-18, Much Ado FINAL.

 

 

Extra- extra-credits

1) Choose a small section of Much Ado, no longer than three minutes in performance. Perform it for the class, complete with blocking. Let the classroom be your stage.

2) Write a version of the song in Act 2 and perform it for the class.

 

 

Come see The Foreigner
yet another extra- extra-credit

untitled1

 

 

Writing documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight
LBH sentence crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Comma usage quick guide
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center
AP Q3 sample essays, Othello
Key AP prose analysis documents
Key AP poetry analysis documents

 

 

Othello at The National Theater

 

 

Actors on Othello

 

 

Consonants in a speech

 

 

Vowels in a speech

 

 

Using the verse

April 2-6

Weekly calendar

 

Monday

juanfelipeherrera12 

 

 

 

 

Today. No classes.

Tonight.

Ongoing.

 

 

Tuesday

wislawaszymborska12 

 

 

 

 

Today. Much Ado Act 5.1

4-3-18, Much Ado speech analysis essay due by 15:30.

Have your copy of Othello ready to go for reading over the weekend.

3-26-18, The world of comedy essay opens for viewing today at 15:30.
     For Friday, you are to go to turnitin, open the essay, print the "current view" option, and handwrite my comments above/linked by arrow to the corresponding bubble; and correct every mistake indicated by an X. 100-point participation grade. I will reject work not in accordance with these guidelines.
     One aspect of quoting poetry I neglected to mention is the practice of marking line breaks with a /. See this document for more about quoting poetry (link here).

 

Tonight. Read Much Ado 5.2 & 5.3. Read for drama first, using the left-page guides.

 

Ongoing. Friday, April 6. 4-6-18, Much Ado About Nothing AP Q 3 essay.

Monday, April 9. First version of Much Ado spring final exam essay due. See details beneath Assignments due in middle column.

 

 

 

Wednesday

charlessimic12 

 

 

 

 

Today. Much Ado 5.2-3.

 

Tonight. Read Much Ado 5.4

Begin preparing for Friday's in-class AP Q3 essay. Aid your preparation by reading pages 164-201 in the Cambridge edition.

 

Ongoing. Friday, April 6. 4-6-18, Much Ado About Nothing AP Q 3 essay.
     Monday, April 9. First version of Much Ado spring final exam essay due. See details beneath Assignments due in middle column.

 

 

Thursday

augustwilson12 

 

 

 

 

Today. Much Ado 5.4.

 

Tonight. Continue preparing for Friday's AP Q 3 essay on Much Ado.

Ongoing. Friday, April 6. 4-6-18, Much Ado About Nothing AP Q 3 essay.


     Monday, April 9. First version of Much Ado spring final exam essay due. See details beneath Assignments due in middle column.

 

Friday

cormacmccarthy12 

 

 

 

 

Today. In-class AP Q 3 essay, Much Ado About Nothing.
     3-26-18, The world of comedy comments and corrections due in class today.

 

Tonight. Read this document about tragedy (link here); then read Othello 1.1. Read for drama first and use the left-page guides. Think exposition. What is the dramatic situation? Whom do we meet? What do they want and why? How do they speak? Who is Iago? What makes him tick? What are your first impressions of Cassio and Othello?

 

Ongoing. Monday, April 9. First version of Much Ado spring final exam essay due. See details beneath Assignments due in middle column.

Much Ado About Nothing
reading links

muchadobandb3

Shakespearean comedy
Comedy defined by David Mikics
OED, note, v.2 definition
Search Shakespeare's works
Shakespeare and love
Shakespeare's rhetorical devices
Shakespeare's language from RSC
Introduction from RSC edition
Scene-by-scene summary
Reading a play
Reading questions
The Globe's 2011 production of Much Ado

 

 

Exploring 4.1

 

 

Beatrice's journey

 

 

Actor's process

 

 

An Actor's 10 key questions

alancummingacting5

1. Who am I?
2. Where am I?
3. When is it?
4. Where have I just come from?
5. What do I want?
6. Why do I want it?
7. Why do I want it now?
8. What will happen if I don't get it now?
9. How will I get what I want by doing what?
10. What must I overcome? (full article here)

 

 

The crisis in manhood


 

Assignments due
read them in full

stephenkingworking12

 

Tuesday, April 3 by 15:30. 4-3-18, Much Ado speech analysis. See details on assignment document (link here).

 

Friday, April 6. 3-26-18, The world of comedy essay, printed from turnitin "current view" option; handwrite my comments linked to bubbles; correct mistakes indicated with an X. 100-point participation grade.

 

Friday, April 6. 4-6-18, Much Ado About Nothing AP Q 3 essay. A 100-point participation grade only. Essay to be peergraded.

 

Final essay, spring 2018. See the assignment document for details (link here).

 

Monday, April 9 by 15:30. First draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-9-18, Much Ado DRAFT. Think of this draft as the essay you would normally turn in. Think of it as a final draft.

 

Tuesday, April 10. Peergrade, 4-6-18, Much Ado About Nothing AP Q 3 essay. 100-point participation grade.

 

Monday, April 30 by 15:30. Final draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-30-18, Much Ado FINAL.

 

 

Extra- extra-credits

1) Choose a small section of Much Ado, no longer than three minutes in performance. Perform it for the class, complete with blocking. Let the classroom be your stage.

2) Write a version of the song in Act 2 and perform it for the class.

 

 

Come see The Foreigner
yet another extra- extra-credit

untitled

 

 

Next book, click image for details

othello3

 

 

Writing documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight
LBH sentence crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Comma usage quick guide
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center
AP Q3 sample essays, Othello
Key AP prose analysis documents
Key AP poetry analysis documents

 

 

Speaking blank verse

March 26-30

Weekly calendar

 

Monday

juanfelipeherrera11 

 

 

 

 

Today. Much Ado Act 3. 3-26-18, The world of comedy essay due by 15:30.

Tonight. Read Much Ado 4.1.1-193, end of Leonato's speech on page 111. Read for drama first, using the left-page guides. Pay special attention to Leonato's speech in this section, doing some close reading/poetry analysis to define HOW he speaks. What devices do you see working? What effects do they create?

Ongoing. Thursday, March 29 in class. Written out bubble comments for 3-6-18, In-class poetry analysis essay. 100-point quiz grade.

Tuesday, April 3 by 15:30. 4-3-18, Much Ado speech analysis

 

 

Tuesday

wislawaszymborska11 

 

 

 

 

Today. Much Ado Act 4.1.1-193. Leonato's speech.

Tonight. Read Much Ado 4.1.194-end. Read for drama first, using the left-page guides. Watch the speaking blank verse video in middle column. Notics how helpful iambic ise to understanding and performance. One key aspect of this section is the interaction between Benedick and Beatrice. What themes are in play here? Define them and come to some understanding about them.

Ongoing. Thursday, March 29 in class. Written out bubble comments for 3-6-18, In-class poetry analysis essay. 100-point quiz grade.

Tuesday, April 3 by 15:30. 4-3-18, Much Ado speech analysis

 

 

Wednesday

charlessimic11 

 

 

 

 

Today. Much Ado 4.1.194-end.

Tonight. Read Much Ado 4.2. Read for drama first, using the left-page guides. How does the shift in mood function? Act 4 is about falling action. How does Act 4 begin that fall? Do you sense the play working toward resolution? How do the scenes perform that work?

     As I say in one of the essay topics, I don't get the Dogberry scenes. Well, I see their function, I suppose, but I don't like them. What do you think about them, 4.2 and 3.3 and 3.5. Do they perform important plot function, thematic function? Are they just funny?

Ongoing. Thursday, March 29 in class. Written out bubble comments for 3-6-18, In-class poetry analysis essay. 100-point quiz grade.

Tuesday, April 3 by 15:30. 4-3-18, Much Ado speech analysis

 

 

Thursday

augustwilson11 

 

 

 

 

Today. Much Ado 4.2.

Tonight. For Tuesday. Read Much Ado 5.1. Read for drama first, using the left-page guides.

We begin Othello on Monday, April 9, with reading the weekend before. Have your copy ready.

Ongoing. Tuesday, April 3 by 15:30. 4-3-18, Much Ado speech analysis

 

Friday

cormacmccarthy11 

 

 

 

 

Today. No classes. Good Friday.

Ongoing. Tuesday, April 3 by 15:30. 4-3-18, Much Ado speech analysis

Much Ado About Nothing
reading links

muchadobandb2

Shakespearean comedy
Comedy defined by David Mikics
OED, note, v.2 definition
Search Shakespeare's works
Shakespeare and love
Shakespeare's rhetorical devices
Shakespeare's language from RSC
Introduction from RSC edition
Scene-by-scene summary
Reading a play
Reading questions
The Globe's 2011 production of Much Ado

 

 

Exploring 4.1

 

 

Beatrice's journey

 

 

Actor's process

 

 

An Actor's 10 key questions

alancummingacting4

1. Who am I?
2. Where am I?
3. When is it?
4. Where have I just come from?
5. What do I want?
6. Why do I want it?
7. Why do I want it now?
8. What will happen if I don't get it now?
9. How will I get what I want by doing what?
10. What must I overcome? (full article here)
 

Assignments due
read them in full

stephenkingworking11

 

Monday, March 26. 3-26-18, The world of comedy: 50-point essay. See the assignment here (link here). Those on Kairos have until Wednesday 15:30.

 

Thursday, March 29 in class. Written out bubble comments for 3-6-18, In-class poetry analysis essay. 100-point quiz grade.

 

Tuesday, April 3 by 15:30. 4-3-18, Much Ado speech analysis. See details on assignment document (link here).

 

Final essay, spring 2018. See the assignment document for details (link here).

 

Monday, April 9 by 15:30. First draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-9-18, Much Ado DRAFT.

 

Monday, April 30 by 15:30. Final draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-30-18, Much Ado FINAL.

 

 

Extra- extra-credits

1) Choose a small section of Much Ado, no longer than three minutes in performance. Perform it for the class, complete with blocking. Let the classroom be your stage.

2) Write a version of the song in Act 2 and perform it for the class.

 

 

 

Next book, click image for details

othello2

 

 

Writing documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight
LBH sentence crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Comma usage quick guide
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center
AP Q3 sample essays, Othello
Key AP prose analysis documents
Key AP poetry analysis documents

 

 

Speaking blank verse

March 19-23

Monday

juanfelipeherrera10 

 

 

 

 

Today. Reading a play. Shakespeare. Much Ado 1.1.

Tonight. Read Much Ado 1.2-1.3, end of Act 1. Read for drama first, using the left-page guides. See Looking back at Act 1 on page 24.
     Act 1 gives us the exposition, acquaints us with the world of the story. Do you know the main characters and conflicts? List out some conflicts to be resolved. How might they be resolved?
     Shakespeare is known for including serious issues in his comedies. Do you see any more serious issues lurking beneath the laughter?

     Terms to know: blank verse; iambic pentameter; prose vs. verse; rimed couplet, open and closed; half line; shared line; lists, ladders. Acquaint yourself with of other of Shakespeare's rhetorical devices (link here). Be prepared for spot quizzes about those terms.

Ongoing. Monday, March 26. 3-26-18, The world of comedy: 50-point essay.

 

 

Tuesday

wislawaszymborska10 

 

 

 

 

Today. Much Ado Act 1.

Tonight. Read Much Ado 2.1. Read for drama first, using the left-page guides. Act 2 is about rising action, complication, obstacles. How does 2.1 present obstacles or the threat of obstacles?

     I cannot recommend renting The Globe's 2011 production (link here).

Ongoing. Monday, March 26. 3-26-18, The world of comedy: 50-point essay.

 

 

Wednesday

charlessimic10 

 

 

 

 

Today. Much Ado 2.1.

Tonight. Read Much Ado 2.2-2.3, end of Act 2. Read for drama first, using the left-page guides. See Looking back at Act 2 on page 62. Hear a version of the Song (link here).

Final essay/exam assignment posted. Read it through and begin choosing a topic. Choosing now, lets you read the rest of the play with some serious intention, lets your focus your note-taking, evidence-gathering, thinking.

I mentioned in class the greate good of keeping notes for your topic as you read the remainder of the play. Here's a sample of my general reading notes for 2.3 part 1.

Ongoing. Monday, March 26. 3-26-18, The world of comedy: 50-point essay.

 

 

Thursday

augustwilson10 

 

 

 

 

Today. Much Ado 2.2-2.3, Act 2.

Tonight. Make a list of scenes you especially want to see tomorrow? Why those scenes?

Ongoing. Monday, March 26. 3-26-18, The world of comedy: 50-point essay.

 

Friday

cormacmccarthy10 

 

 

 

 

Today. Screening day. The Globe's 2011 production of Much Ado.

Tonight. Read Much Ado Act 3. Read for drama first, using the left-page guides. In the 5-act structure, Act 3 contains rising action and a climax. Plot out the Act.

Ongoing. Monday, March 26. 3-26-18, The world of comedy: 50-point essay.

Much Ado About Nothing
reading links

muchadobandb1

Shakespearean comedy
Comedy defined by David Mikics
OED, note, v.2 definition
Search Shakespeare's works
Shakespeare and love
Shakespeare's rhetorical devices
Shakespeare's language from RSC
Introduction from RSC edition
Scene-by-scene summary
Reading a play
Reading questions
The Globe's 2011 production of Much Ado

 

 

Rehearsing 1.1

 

 

Exploring 4.1

 

 

Beatrice's journey

 

 

Actor's process

 

 

An Actor's 10 key questions

alancummingacting3

1. Who am I?
2. Where am I?
3. When is it?
4. Where have I just come from?
5. What do I want?
6. Why do I want it?
7. Why do I want it now?
8. What will happen if I don't get it now?
9. How will I get what I want by doing what?
10. What must I overcome? (full article here)
 

Assignments due
read them in full

stephenkingworking10

 

Monday, March 26. 3-26-18, The world of comedy: 50-point essay. See the assignment here (link here). Those on Kairos have until Wednesday 15:30.

 

Sunday, April 1 by 22:00. Peergrade, 3-26-18, The world of comedy: 100-point essay. The door closes at locks at 22:00.

 

Tuesday, April 3 by 8:00. Responses to peergrade feedback, 3-26-18, The world of comedy: 100-point essay.

 

Final essay, spring 2018. See the assignment document for details (link here).

 

 

Extra- extra-credits
1) Julius Caesar from NT Live
buy tickets here

I will be at the Marq*E, Thursday, March 22.

2) Choose a small section of Much Ado, no longer than three minutes in performance. Perform the section for the class, complete with blocking. Let the classroom be your stage.

 

 

Next books, click image for details

muchado3othello1

 

 

Writing documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight
LBH sentence crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Comma usage quick guide
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center
AP Q3 sample essays, Othello
Key AP prose analysis documents
Key AP poetry analysis documents

 

 

Speaking blank verse

 

 

Rehearsal process, Much Ado

 

 

How do actors use movement
and space to show emotion,
relationships?

March 5-9

Monday

juanfelipeherrera9 

 

 

 

 

Today. No classes. Raffle holiday.

Tonight.

Ongoing.

 

 

Tuesday

wislawaszymborska9 

 

 

 

 

Today. In-class poetry analysis essay.

Tonight. Read, print, annotate My Papa's Waltz by Theodore Roethkle (link here). How does Roethke use stanza, line, rime, and meter? Who is the speaker? When is he speaking? What makes him speak? Define the tone of the poem.

See Roethke's drafts of the poem (link here). What changes did he make? Do those changes improve the poem? Have concrete thoughts about how and why, speaking poetically, of course.

We will also look at the poem you wrote about.

Ongoing. Sunday, March 11. Peergrade feedback for 3-6-18, In-class poetry analysis: 50-point essay by 22:00. You have 2 essays to review.

Tuesday, March 13 by 8:00. Responses to feedback for 3-6-18, In-class poetry analysis: 50-point essay. I want to see that you write a comment to your reviewers.

 

 

Wednesday

charlessimic9 

 

 

 

 

Today. Roethke and Tuesday's poem.

Tonight. Nothing.

Ongoing. Sunday, March 11. Peergrade feedback for 3-6-18, In-class poetry analysis: 50-point essay by 22:00. You have 2 essays to review.

Tuesday, March 13 by 8:00. Responses to feedback for 3-6-18, In-class poetry analysis: 50-point essay. I want to see that you write a comment to your reviewers.

 

 

Thursday

augustwilson9 

 

 

 

 

Today. We'll look at the poems you choose.

Tonight. For Monday, March 19, the day of our return.

Read Shakespearean comedy and Comedy defined by David Mikics, both linked under Much Ado About Nothing reading links in right column, to gain some genre knowledge. Then look over Reading a play, linked in the same place. How does reading a play differ from reading a novel or poem? How does a play differ from seeing a play performed? We'll talk a bit about that when we return. For now, try to read as an actor, a director, a designer. See how actors use movement and space to show emotion in video in middle column.

Read Much Ado 1.1. (That's Act 1, scene 1 for the uninitiated.) Pay attention to ALL of the helpful material The Cambridge School Shakespeare provides. You will find it helpful, I promise. You might also use the reading questions I provide, linked beneath Much Ado About Nothing reading links in the right column. But use those in the book first. They're more helpful. And use the scene-by-scene summary linked beneath Much Ado About Nothing reading links. It will help you know what happens and clue you into some themes.

Read to understand the play as drama before you understand it as a written text. That means thinking about the actor's questions. See a list of them in right column. Think about why characters say what they say and why they do what they do.Think about what characters want. Think motivation. And don't worry if you don't understand everything the characters say. Actors and directors don't, either, at first.

We'll be using The Globe's 2011 production in class. You can rent it here.

Ongoing. Sunday, March 11. Peergrade feedback for 3-6-18, In-class poetry analysis: 50-point essay by 22:00. You have 2 essays to review.

Tuesday, March 13 by 8:00. Responses to feedback for 3-6-18, In-class poetry analysis: 50-point essay. I want to see that you write a comment to your reviewers.

 

Friday

cormacmccarthy9 

 

 

 

 

Today. No classes. Raffle holiday.

Tonight.

Ongoing. Sunday, March 11. Peergrade feedback for 3-6-18, In-class poetry analysis: 50-point essay by 22:00. You have 2 essays to review.

Tuesday, March 13 by 8:00. Responses to feedback for 3-6-18, In-class poetry analysis: 50-point essay. I want to see that you write a comment to your reviewers.

Much Ado About Nothing
reading links

muchadobandb

Shakespearean comedy
Comedy defined by David Mikics
Shakespeare's rhetorical devices
Introduction from RSC edition
Scene-by-scene summary
Reading a play
Reading questions
My reading questions

 

 

Rehearsing 1.1

 

 

Exploring 4.1

 

 

Beatrice's journey

 

 

Actor's process

 

 

An Actor's 10 key questions

alancummingacting2

1. Who am I?
2. Where am I?
3. When is it?
4. Where have I just come from?
5. What do I want?
6. Why do I want it?
7. Why do I want it now?
8. What will happen if I don't get it now?
9. How will I get what I want by doing what?
10. What must I overcome? (full article here)
 

Assignments due
read them in full

stephenkingworking9

 

Thursday, March 8. Last day to make up work from 3rd Quarter. 15:00 deadline.

 

Tuesday, March 6. In-class poetry analysis essay. You will upload to 3-6-18, In-class poetry analysis: 50-point essay to turnitin by the end of class. You will upload to peergrade by 22:00, when the door will close.

 

Sunday, March 11. Peergrade feedback for 3-6-18, In-class poetry analysis: 50-point essay by 22:00. You have 2 essays to review.

 

Tuesday, March 13 by 8:00. Responses to feedback for 3-6-18, In-class poetry analysis: 50-point essay. I want to see that you write a comment to your reviewers.

 

 

Poetry learning documents

pxPercyByssheShelleybyAlfredClint1 

"Poetry is a sword of lightning ever unsheathed, which consumes the scabbard that would contain it."
                Percy Bysshe Shelley

 

Selections from Shelley's Defense of Poetry here

 

 

Next books, click image for details

muchado2othello

 

 

Writing documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight
LBH sentence crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Comma usage quick guide
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center
AP Q3 sample essays, Othello
Key AP prose analysis documents

 

 

Contemporary comedy, Cheers

 

 

Rehearsal process, Much Ado

 

 

How do actors use movement
and space to show emotion,
relationships?

February 26-March 2

Monday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Ordered your copy of Much Ado about Nothing and Othello yet? Buy the listed editions.

Introduction to poetry; The Lake Isle of Innisfree. AP poetry analysis essay.

Tonight. Print, read, annotate This is Just to Say by William Carlos Williams (link here). What is the literal meaning of this poem? Does it have a meaning beyond the literal? How does it achieve that meaning? Consider how Williams uses plain words and how he arranges sentences into lines, how he breaks sentences into parts. Learn this term: enjambment (link here). Add that term to your poetry vocabulary list. Keep adding new terms to that list.

Print, read, annotate Cargoes by John Masefield (link here). Look up every word you do not know and even those you do in a good dictionary, such as the oxford dictionary online (link here). Define the nature of the words Masefiled uses and the effects of those words. Also think about stanza (link here) and lineation (link here). Add those terms to your poetry vocabulary.

Before or after you read a poem, try making a word cloud from it (link here).

During this week, learn the terms listed under Words on the Poetry vocabulary list (link here). See Poetry learning documents link in middle column, too.

Ongoing.

 

 

Tuesday

wislawaszymborska8 

 

 

 

 

Today. The Scarlet Letter prose analysis essays are posted at turnitin. I expect to see that you have reviewed your essay and my comments.

Williams and Masefield. Words, line, stanza.

Tonight. Read, print, annotate Aftermath by Longfellow (link here). Use a dictionary to look up words you don't know and words you do. How does Longfellow use the meanings of words? How does he use sound, stanza, rhythm, rime?

Read, print annotate Grass by Carl Sandburg (link here). How does Sandburg use words? How does he use allusion?

Ongoing.

 

 

Wednesday

charlessimic8 

 

 

 

 

Today. AP Q3 in-class make up during activity period today, in 801.

Longfellow and Sandburg.

Tonight. Print, read, annotate Upon Julia's Clothes by Robert Herrick (link here). How does Herrick use words to achieve surprising effects?

Print, read annotate Blandeur by Kay Ryan (link here). How does Ryan words, rime, line?

Read, print, annotate The Fury of Aerial Bombardment by Richard Eberhart (link here). How does Eberhart use words, stanza, rime, sound?

Ongoing.

 

 

Thursday

augustwilson8 

 

 

 

 

Today. Herrick, Ryan, Eberhart.

Tonight. Print, read, annotate Rhythm (link here). Familiarize yourself with basic terms and concepts. We'll look at them and at the poems tomorrow in class. You need to know basic meters and to be able to scan (identify meter) in poems.

Ongoing.

 

 

Friday

cormacmccarthy8 

 

 

 

 

Today. Rhythm.

Tonight. Tuesday, you will do an in-class poetry analysis.

Ongoing.

Much Ado About Nothing
reading links

Shakespearean comedy
Comedy defined by David Mikics
Introduction from RSC edition
Scene-by-scene summary
Reading questions
My reading questions
Globe production of Much Ado

 

 

Rehearsing 1.1

 

 

Exploring 4.1

 

 

Beatrice's journey

 

 

Actor's process

 

 

An Actor's 10 key questions

alancummingacting1

1. Who am I?
2. Where am I?
3. When is it?
4. Where have I just come from?
5. What do I want?
6. Why do I want it?
7. Why do I want it now?
8. What will happen if I don't get it now?
9. How will I get what I want by doing what?
10. What must I overcome? (full article here)
 

Assignments due
read them in full

stephenkingworking8

 

Sunday, February 25. Peergrades for both in-class essays by 22:00.

 

Tuesday, February 27 by 8:00. Responses to peergrade feedback. I especially want to see you write something to your reviewer.

 

Wednesday, February 28 during activity period. 2-23-18, The Age of Innocence AP Question 3 essay make up in 801.

 

Tuesday, March 6. In-class poetry analysis essay. You will upload to 3-6-18, In-class poetry analysis: 50-point essay to turnitin by the end of class. You will upload to peergrade by 22:00, when the door will close.

 

Sunday, March 11. Peergrade feedback for 3-6-18, In-class poetry analysis: 50-point essay by 22:00. You have 2 essays to review.

 

Tuesday, March 13 by 8:00. Responses to feedback for 3-6-18, In-class poetry analysis: 50-point essay. I want to see that you write a comment to your reviewers.

 

 

 

 

Poetry learning documents

pxPercyByssheShelleybyAlfredClint 

"Poetry is a sword of lightning ever unsheathed, which consumes the scabbard that would contain it."
                Percy Bysshe Shelley

 

Selections from Shelley's Defense of Poetry here

 

 

Next book, click image for details

 

 

Writing documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight
LBH sentence crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Comma usage quick guide
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center
AP Q3 sample essays, Othello
Key AP prose analysis documents

 

 

Contemporary comedy, Cheers

 

 

Rehearsal process, Much Ado

February 19-23

Monday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Presidents' Day. No classes.

Tonight.

Ongoing.

 

 

Tuesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. The Age of Innocence Chapters 32-34.

Next book, Much Ado About Nothing by Shakespeare. Buy the copy pictured in middle column. Click cover for details.

Let's talk time reality and choice of reading. Ibsen, Shakespeare. Time's running short, so we must focus. My thought is to read two Shakespeare plays, Much Ado About Nothing, a comedy, and Othello, a tragedy.

Tonight. Continue preparing for Thursday's in-class AP Q3 essay.

Ongoing.

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. The Age of Innocence. AP Q3 prompts (link here). You'll work in groups to outline Q3 prompts.

CHANGE OF PLANS. In-class essay on Friday.

See sample Othello Q3 essays linked under Writing documents in middle column.

Tonight. Read these sample essays from 2017. Score them. Continue preparing for Thursday's in-class AP Q3 essay.

Ongoing.

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Sample AP Q3 essays.

Tonight. Prepare for tomorrow's AP Q3 in-class essay.

Ongoing.

Tuesday.

 

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. In-class AP Question 3 essay, The Age of Innocence. Upload your essay to 2-23-18, The Age of Innocence AP Question 3 essay: 100-point essay before you leave. Upload the essay to peergrade as well. Peergrade will remain open until Friday at 22:00, when the door will close.

Poetry, some definitions, some basics.

Tonight. Prepare some thoughts about poetry and reading poetry. Seriously. What constitutes poetry in your world? Where do you encounter poetry? What is poetry? Read this from Edward Hirsch. Begin keeping a list of poetry vocabulary. Read this about what to know about a poem, some questions to consider. Read What is poetry? found in this folder.

Print and read Yeats's The Lake Isle of Innisfree (link here). Read this about lyric poetry. Prepare thoughts on these topics.

1) Read the poem aloud. What does it sound like? How does the poem use sound? How does the poem create those sounds? Read about alliteration and assonance here and bookmark the site. Add those terms to your list of poetry vocabulary. Mark instances of alliteration and assonance in the poem. What is the effect of sound in the poem? Think feeling and tone.

2) Paraphrase each line of the poem. Have you captured the "meaning? of the poem?

3) Who is the speaker? Why is the speaker speaking? What is the speaker expressing in terms of emotion, thought?

4) Read about imagery here. Mark instances of imagery in the poem. What senses does the poem incite? What is the effect?

5) Poets use words artistically. Look up every word you don't know and even some you do. You need to know the denotation and connotation and etymology of words. Use a good dictionary, like the Oxford online.

6) Poets artisticaly use syntax, verb tense, among other grammatical elements. What do you notice about verb tense in the poem?

7) How does the poem break sentences into lines? What's the deal with those line breaks? How does the poem use stanzas? What's the deal with those stanzas?

8) Does the poem have a meter? Learn about basic meter here. Add the definitions to your poetry vocabulary.

9) What is the rhythm of the poem? Not its meter but the speed of the words and lines. What effect of that rhythm?

10) What is this poem about? Answer this question any way you find interesting. DO NOT merely think of school-like theme.

Ongoing.

Much Ado About Nothing
reading links

Shakespearean comedy
Comedy defined by David Mikics
Introduction from RSC edition
Scene-by-scene summary
Reading questions
Globe production of Much Ado

 

 

Rehearsing 1.1

 

 

Exploring 4.1

 

 

Beatrice's journey

 

 

Actor's process

 

 

An Actor's 10 key questions

1. Who am I?
2. Where am I?
3. When is it?
4. Where have I just come from?
5. What do I want?
6. Why do I want it?
7. Why do I want it now?
8. What will happen if I don't get it now?
9. How will I get what I want by doing what?
10. What must I overcome? (full article here)
 

Assignments due
read them in full

 

Tuesday, February 20 by 8:00. Response to peergrade feedback for 2-9-18 In-class prose analysis.

 

Tuesday, February 20 by 15:30 to 2-20-18, The Scarlet Letter prose analysis at turnitin and peergrade. Prose analysis found here. Practice defining a strong fti, focusing the essay, doing direct/full prose analysis. Keep the essay under 500 words. A 50-point essay.

 

NOTE CHANGE. Friday, February 23. In-class Question 3 (thematic) essay on The Age of Innocence. Though you cannot use your book, you are expected to cite concrete and detailed examples to support and develop your fti. Know novel's themes, characters. settings, plot, language, imagery, etc., well enough to discuss and analyze in detail. I suggest making a list of themes, some ways to focus each, and a list of supporting examples for each. Study them. You need to be prepared to think about the novel as prompt requires.

 

Sunday, February 25. Peergrades for both in-class essays by 22:00.

 

Tuesday, February 27 by 8:00. Responses to peergrade feedback. I especially want to see you write something to your reader.

 

Wednesday, February 28 during activity period. 2-23-18, The Age of Innocence AP Question 3 essay make up in 801.

 

 

Poetry learning documents

 

Next book, click image for details

 

 

Writing documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight
LBH sentence crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Comma usage quick guide
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center
AP Q3 sample essays, Othello
Key AP prose analysis documents

 

 

Contemporary comedy, Cheers

 

 

Rehearsal process, Much Ado

February 12-16

Monday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. The Age of Innocence Chapters 27-29.

Tonight. Read The Age of Innocence Chapters 30-31. Read for yourself but also prepare thoughts, passages, challenges to the discussion questions for your section posted here.

Be sure to respond to peergrade feedback for 2-9-18 In-class prose analysis by 8:00 tomorrow. That's 8am.

Ongoing. Thursday, February 22. In-class Question 3 (thematic) essay on The Age of Innocence.

 

 

Tuesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. The Age of Innocence Chapters 21-23.

Tonight. Carefully and more fully read the Smollett passage you wrote about last week. Identify concrete literary elements in each ¶ and define a stronger fti re prompt. Be sure to address the whole prompt. Here's the passage if you need it.

Ongoing. Thursday, February 22. In-class Question 3 (thematic) essay on The Age of Innocence.

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Smollet passage. Prose analysis.

Tonight. Read these essays about the Smollett passage you wrote on last Friday (link here). What scores would you give them and why? Here are some sample essays from our class. They're for your reference.

Ongoing. Thursday, February 22. In-class Question 3 (thematic) essay on The Age of Innocence.

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Prose analysis, Smollet.

Tonight. Read The Age of Innocence Chapters 32-33. Read for yourself but also prepare thoughts, passages, challenges to the discussion questions for your section posted here.

Ongoing. Thursday, February 22. In-class Question 3 (thematic) essay on The Age of Innocence.

Tuesday, February 13 by 15:30 to 2-20-18, The Scarlet Letter prose analysis at turnitin and peergrade. Prose analysis found here. Practice defining a strong fti, focusing the essay, doing direct/full prose analysis. Keep the essay under 500 words. A 50-point essay.

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Raffle holiday. No class.

Tonight.

Ongoing. Thursday, February 22. In-class Question 3 (thematic) essay on The Age of Innocence.

Tuesday, February 13 by 15:30 to 2-20-18, The Scarlet Letter prose analysis at turnitin and peergrade. Prose analysis found here. Practice defining a strong fti, focusing the essay, doing direct/full prose analysis. Keep the essay under 500 words. A 50-point essay.

The Age of Innocence
reading links

Edith Wharton on writing fiction
Edith Wharton, Confessions of a novelist
Edith Wharton and the problem of sympathy
The New York social season
New York social customs
Madame X, Singer Sargent
Faust and The Age of Innocence
Waking up to Aliveness
The Age of Innocence vocabulary lists
List of The Age of Innocence reading questions
Discussion guidelines and schedule
 

 

The Age of Innocence
Francine Prose

"Edith Wharton wrote The Age of Innocence—to my mind, her greatest novel—in six months, between September 1919 and March 1920. She was writing about the world—Old New York—in which she had grown up, a world that had already vanished. But writing from a temporal and geographical distance, and through the magnifying lens of retrospect, she was able to enrich her portrait of a society and of a moment in time with everything she had learned and experienced since, with everything she knew about passion and obligation, about the perils of personal fear and social convention, about renunciation and regret, youth and age, memory and fantasy, anticipation and disappointment. America and Europe.     
      "Having read the novel, you can open it at random and be instantly returned to the enthralling if progressively more unhappy inner life of Newland Archer, married to one woman and infatuated with another. You can attend the choreographed dinners and lawn parties, ride in carriages and on ferries, and eavesdrop on seemingly straightforward conversations that conceal—that barely conceal—layers of nuance, subtext, unspoken longing, suppressed declarations of love and overt demarcations of territory. We get to know the characters so well that we know instantly how each major figure is responding to a bit of new information or a changed view of the situation. After a while the author no longer needs to tell us.
     "No one has written more incisively not just about a historical period and a particular social milieu but about something more timeless—the ardor with which we flee and return to the prison of conditioning and convenience. Wharton's graceful sentences create dramatic, populous tableaux and peel back layer after layer of artifice and pretense, of what we say and how we wish to appear, revealing the hidden kernel of what human beings are like, alone and together."

 

 

The Iluminating incident
Edith Wharton

"At every stage in the progress of his tale the novelist must rely on what may be called the illuminating incident to reveal and emphasize the inner meaning of each situation. Illuminating incidents are the magic casements of fiction, its vistas on infinity. They are also the most personal element in any narrative, the author's most direct contribution; and nothing gives such immediate proof of the quality of his imagination--and therefore of the richness of his temperament--as his choices of such episodes....At the conclusion of a novel the illuminating incident need only send its ray backward; but it should send a long enough shaft to meet the light cast forward from the first page....The illuminating incident is not only the proof of the novelist's imaginative sensibility; it is also the best means of giving presentness, immediacy, to his tale."
     "nothing shows the quality of the novelist's imagination more clearly than the incidents he singles out to illuminate the course of events and the inner workings of his people's souls."

Assignments due
read them in full

 

Monday, February 12 during lunch. In-class prose analysis make up in 801.

Tuesday, February 13 by 8:00. Response to peergrade feedback for 2-9-18 In-class prose analysis.

Tuesday, February 13 by 15:30 to 2-20-18, The Scarlet Letter prose analysis at turnitin and peergrade. Prose analysis found here. Practice defining a strong fti, focusing the essay, doing direct/full prose analysis. Keep the essay under 500 words. A 50-point essay.

Thursday, February 22. In-class Question 3 (thematic) essay on The Age of Innocence. Though you cannot use your book, you are expected to cite concrete and detailed examples to support and develop your fti. Know novel's themes, characters. settings, plot, language, imagery, etc., well enough to discuss and analyze in detail. I suggest making a list of themes, some ways to focus each, and a list of supporting examples for each. Study them. You need to be prepared to think about the novel as prompt requires.

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight
LBH sentence crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Comma usage quick guide
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center
AP Q3 sample essays, Othello
Key AP prose analysis documents

 

 

The Age of Innocence
Robert McCrum

"As with all her New York novels, The Age of Innocence makes an ironic commentary on the cruelties and hypocrisies of Manhattan society in the years before, during and after the Great War. Strangely, when it won the 1921 Pulitzer prize, the judges praised it for revealing 'the wholesome atmosphere of American life and the highest standard of American manners and manhood.' Today, while not as merciless in its analysis as The House of Mirth, Wharton's late masterpiece stands as a fierce indictment of a society estranged from culture and in desperate need of a European sensibility. This had been an issue for American writers since Washington Irving, Melville and Hawthorne. Some critics would say it remains unresolved to this day."

 

 

The Century of the Self
Learn how culture is made

February 5-9

Monday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Raffle holiday. No classes.

Tonight.

Ongoing. Friday, February 9. In-class prose analysis essay. 100-point essay. You will upload to 2-9-18 prose analysis: 100-point essay at turnitin and peergrade.

Sunday, February 11 by 22:00. Peergrade, 2-9-18, In-class prose analysis essay. .

 

 

Tuesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. The Age of Innocence Chapters 21-23.

Tonight. Study for vocab. quiz, The Age of Innocence list 4. Sentences might or might not come from the novel. Vocabulary lists now linked under The Age of Innocence reading links in right column.

By 8:00 tomorrow morning, respond to the feedback you received for 1-29-18, The Age of Innocence prose analysis 2. If you do not respond, you can score no higher than 85 for your participation.

Ongoing. Friday, February 9. In-class prose analysis essay. 100-point essay. You will upload to 2-9-18 prose analysis: 100-point essay at turnitin and peergrade.

Sunday, February 11 by 22:00. Peergrade, 2-9-18, In-class prose analysis essay.

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Vocab. quiz The Age of Innocence list 4. Here are zipgrade ids.

Tonight. Read The Age of Innocence Chapters 24-26. Read for yourself but also prepare thoughts, passages, challenges to the discussion questions for your section posted here.

Ongoing. Friday, February 9. In-class prose analysis essay. 100-point essay. You will upload to 2-9-18 prose analysis: 100-point essay at turnitin and peergrade.

Sunday, February 11 by 22:00. Peergrade, 2-9-18, In-class prose analysis essay.

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. The Age of Innocence Chapters 24-26.

Tonight. Prepare for tomorrow's in-class prose analysis. Review your last two prose analysis essay to define where you need to improve. Read and write with a mission. What does prompt ask me to respond to? What is my fti about the prompt? What literary elements in the passage show me that fti? What is my essay's focus?

Ongoing. Friday, February 9. In-class prose analysis essay. 100-point essay. You will upload to 2-9-18 prose analysis: 100-point essay at turnitin and peergrade.

Sunday, February 11 by 22:00. Peergrade, 2-9-18, In-class prose analysis essay.

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. In-class prose analysis essay.

Tonight. Read The Age of Innocence Chapters 27-29. Read for yourself but also prepare thoughts, passages, challenges to the discussion questions for your section posted here.

Ongoing. Sunday, February 11 by 22:00. Peergrade, 2-9-18, In-class prose analysis essay.

The Age of Innocence
reading links

Edith Wharton on writing fiction
Edith Wharton, Confessions of a novelist
Edith Wharton and the problem of sympathy
The New York social season
New York social customs
Madame X, Singer Sargent
Faust and The Age of Innocence
Waking up to Aliveness
The Age of Innocence vocabulary lists
List of The Age of Innocence reading questions
Discussion guidelines and schedule
 

 

The Age of Innocence
Francine Prose

"Edith Wharton wrote The Age of Innocence—to my mind, her greatest novel—in six months, between September 1919 and March 1920. She was writing about the world—Old New York—in which she had grown up, a world that had already vanished. But writing from a temporal and geographical distance, and through the magnifying lens of retrospect, she was able to enrich her portrait of a society and of a moment in time with everything she had learned and experienced since, with everything she knew about passion and obligation, about the perils of personal fear and social convention, about renunciation and regret, youth and age, memory and fantasy, anticipation and disappointment. America and Europe.     
      "Having read the novel, you can open it at random and be instantly returned to the enthralling if progressively more unhappy inner life of Newland Archer, married to one woman and infatuated with another. You can attend the choreographed dinners and lawn parties, ride in carriages and on ferries, and eavesdrop on seemingly straightforward conversations that conceal—that barely conceal—layers of nuance, subtext, unspoken longing, suppressed declarations of love and overt demarcations of territory. We get to know the characters so well that we know instantly how each major figure is responding to a bit of new information or a changed view of the situation. After a while the author no longer needs to tell us.
     "No one has written more incisively not just about a historical period and a particular social milieu but about something more timeless—the ardor with which we flee and return to the prison of conditioning and convenience. Wharton's graceful sentences create dramatic, populous tableaux and peel back layer after layer of artifice and pretense, of what we say and how we wish to appear, revealing the hidden kernel of what human beings are like, alone and together."

 

 

The Iluminating incident
Edith Wharton

"At every stage in the progress of his tale the novelist must rely on what may be called the illuminating incident to reveal and emphasize the inner meaning of each situation. Illuminating incidents are the magic casements of fiction, its vistas on infinity. They are also the most personal element in any narrative, the author's most direct contribution; and nothing gives such immediate proof of the quality of his imagination--and therefore of the richness of his temperament--as his choices of such episodes....At the conclusion of a novel the illuminating incident need only send its ray backward; but it should send a long enough shaft to meet the light cast forward from the first page....The illuminating incident is not only the proof of the novelist's imaginative sensibility; it is also the best means of giving presentness, immediacy, to his tale."
     "nothing shows the quality of the novelist's imagination more clearly than the incidents he singles out to illuminate the course of events and the inner workings of his people's souls."

Assignments due
read them in full

 

Wednesday, February 7. The Age of Innocence prose analysis 2 make up, 8:15 in 801.

Wednesday, February 7. Vocabulary Quiz, The Age of Innocence list 4.

Friday, February 9. In-class prose analysis essay. 100-point essay. You will upload to 2-9-18 prose analysis: 100-point essay at turnitin and peergrade. Review your last two prose analysis essay to define where you need to improve. Read and write with a mission. What does prompt ask me to respond to? What is my fti about the prompt? What literary elements in the passage show me that fti? What is my essay's focus?

Sunday, February 11 by 22:00. Peergrade, 2-9-18, In-class prose analysis. You are to respond to the feedback you receive by 8:00 Tuesday, February 13. If you do not respond, you can score no higher than 85.

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight
LBH sentence crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Comma usage quick guide
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center
AP Q3 sample essays, Othello
Key AP prose analysis documents

 

 

The Age of Innocence
Robert McCrum

"As with all her New York novels, The Age of Innocence makes an ironic commentary on the cruelties and hypocrisies of Manhattan society in the years before, during and after the Great War. Strangely, when it won the 1921 Pulitzer prize, the judges praised it for revealing 'the wholesome atmosphere of American life and the highest standard of American manners and manhood.' Today, while not as merciless in its analysis as The House of Mirth, Wharton's late masterpiece stands as a fierce indictment of a society estranged from culture and in desperate need of a European sensibility. This had been an issue for American writers since Washington Irving, Melville and Hawthorne. Some critics would say it remains unresolved to this day."

 

 

The Century of the Self
Learn how culture is made

January 29-February 2

Monday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. The Age of Innocence Chapters 8-10.

Tonight. Read The Age of Innocence Chapters 17-18, end of Book 1. Read for yourself but also prepare thoughts, passages, challenges to the discussion questions for your section posted here.

Ongoing. Sunday, February 5 by 22:00. Peergrade, 1-29-18, The Age of Innocence prose analysis 2. A 100-point participation grade.

 

 

Tuesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. The Age of Innocence Chapters 17-18.

Tonight. Study for vocab. quiz, The Age of Innocence list 3. Sentences might or might not come from the novel. Vocabulary lists now linked under The Age of Innocence reading links in right column.

Ongoing. Sunday, February 5 by 22:00. Peergrade, 1-29-18, The Age of Innocence prose analysis 2. A 100-point participation grade.

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Vocab. quiz The Age of Innocence list 3. Here are zipgrade ids.

Tonight. Enjoy a night off. Almost. Before Thursday's class, look through your The Age of Innocence prose analysis 2 and my comments. I want you to come to class with questions about prose analysis writing, your essay in particular and my comments.

Ongoing. Sunday, February 5 by 22:00. Peergrade, 1-29-18, The Age of Innocence prose analysis 2. A 100-point participation grade.

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Sample essays, The Age of Innocence prose analysis 2.

Tonight. Read The Age of Innocence Chapters 19-20. Read for yourself but also prepare thoughts, passages, challenges to the discussion questions for your section posted here.

Write a quick practice prose analysis of just the opening ¶ of Chapter 19. How do details characterize Archer's future? Upload to turnitin assignment 2-2-18, The Age of Innocence Chapter 19 prose analysis practice: 50-point quiz before 8:00 am tomorrow morning. Write no more than one ¶. Ongoing. Sunday, February 5 by 22:00. Peergrade, 1-29-18, The Age of Innocence prose analysis 2. A 100-point participation grade.

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. The Age of Innocence Chapters 19 & 20.

Tonight. Read The Age of Innocence Chapters 21-23. Read for yourself but also prepare thoughts, passages, challenges to the discussion questions for your section posted here.

Ongoing. Sunday, February 5 by 22:00. Peergrade, 1-29-18, The Age of Innocence prose analysis 2. A 100-point participation grade.

The Age of Innocence
reading links

Edith Wharton on writing fiction
Edith Wharton, Confessions of a novelist
Edith Wharton and the problem of sympathy
The New York social season
New York social customs
Madame X, Singer Sargent
Faust and The Age of Innocence
Waking up to Aliveness
The Age of Innocence vocabulary lists
List of The Age of Innocence reading questions
Discussion guidelines and schedule
 

 

The Age of Innocence
Francine Prose

"Edith Wharton wrote The Age of Innocence—to my mind, her greatest novel—in six months, between September 1919 and March 1920. She was writing about the world—Old New York—in which she had grown up, a world that had already vanished. But writing from a temporal and geographical distance, and through the magnifying lens of retrospect, she was able to enrich her portrait of a society and of a moment in time with everything she had learned and experienced since, with everything she knew about passion and obligation, about the perils of personal fear and social convention, about renunciation and regret, youth and age, memory and fantasy, anticipation and disappointment. America and Europe.     
      "Having read the novel, you can open it at random and be instantly returned to the enthralling if progressively more unhappy inner life of Newland Archer, married to one woman and infatuated with another. You can attend the choreographed dinners and lawn parties, ride in carriages and on ferries, and eavesdrop on seemingly straightforward conversations that conceal—that barely conceal—layers of nuance, subtext, unspoken longing, suppressed declarations of love and overt demarcations of territory. We get to know the characters so well that we know instantly how each major figure is responding to a bit of new information or a changed view of the situation. After a while the author no longer needs to tell us.
     "No one has written more incisively not just about a historical period and a particular social milieu but about something more timeless—the ardor with which we flee and return to the prison of conditioning and convenience. Wharton's graceful sentences create dramatic, populous tableaux and peel back layer after layer of artifice and pretense, of what we say and how we wish to appear, revealing the hidden kernel of what human beings are like, alone and together."

 

 

The Iluminating incident
Edith Wharton

"At every stage in the progress of his tale the novelist must rely on what may be called the illuminating incident to reveal and emphasize the inner meaning of each situation. Illuminating incidents are the magic casements of fiction, its vistas on infinity. They are also the most personal element in any narrative, the author's most direct contribution; and nothing gives such immediate proof of the quality of his imagination--and therefore of the richness of his temperament--as his choices of such episodes....At the conclusion of a novel the illuminating incident need only send its ray backward; but it should send a long enough shaft to meet the light cast forward from the first page....The illuminating incident is not only the proof of the novelist's imaginative sensibility; it is also the best means of giving presentness, immediacy, to his tale."
     "nothing shows the quality of the novelist's imagination more clearly than the incidents he singles out to illuminate the course of events and the inner workings of his people's souls."

Assignments due
read them in full

 

Monday, January 29. Prose analysis in class. You will upload to turnitin and peergrade assignment 1-26-18, The Age of Innocence prose analysis 2. A 100-point essay grade.

Wednesday, January 31. Vocabulary Quiz, The Age of Innocence list 3.

Sunday, February 5 by 22:00. Peergrade, 1-29-18, The Age of Innocence prose analysis 2. A 100-point participation grade.

Wednesday, February 7. The Age of Innocence prose analysis 2 make up.

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight
LBH sentence crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Comma usage quick guide
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center
AP Q3 sample essays, Othello
Key AP prose analysis documents

 

 

The Age of Innocence
Robert McCrum

"As with all her New York novels, The Age of Innocence makes an ironic commentary on the cruelties and hypocrisies of Manhattan society in the years before, during and after the Great War. Strangely, when it won the 1921 Pulitzer prize, the judges praised it for revealing 'the wholesome atmosphere of American life and the highest standard of American manners and manhood.' Today, while not as merciless in its analysis as The House of Mirth, Wharton's late masterpiece stands as a fierce indictment of a society estranged from culture and in desperate need of a European sensibility. This had been an issue for American writers since Washington Irving, Melville and Hawthorne. Some critics would say it remains unresolved to this day."

 

 

The Century of the Self
Learn how culture is made

January 22-26

Monday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. The Age of Innocence Chapters 8-10.

Tonight. Read The Age of Innocence Chapters 11-13. Read for yourself but also prepare thoughts, passages, challenges to the discussion questions for your section posted here.

Ongoing.

 

 

Tuesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. The Age of Innocence Chapters 11-13.

Tonight. Study for vocab. quiz, The Age of Innocence list 2, Chapters 4-9. Sentences might or might not come from the novel. Vocabulary lists now linked under The Age of Innocence reading links in right column.

Ongoing.

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Vocab. quiz The Age of Innocence list 2. Here are zipgrade ids.

Tonight. Read The Age of Innocence Chapters 14-16. Read for yourself but also prepare thoughts, passages, challenges to the discussion questions for your section posted here.

Ongoing.

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. The Age of Innocence Chapters 14-16.

Tonight.

Ongoing.

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. The Age of Innocence prose analysis 1 discussion, grading notes, sample essays.

Tonight. For Tuesday, read The Age of Innocence Chapters 17-18. Read for yourself but also prepare thoughts, passages, challenges to the discussion questions for your section posted here.

Ongoing. Monday, you will write another prose analysis in class.

The Age of Innocence
reading links

Edith Wharton on writing fiction
Edith Wharton, Confessions of a novelist
Edith Wharton and the problem of sympathy
The New York social season
New York social customs
Madame X, Singer Sargent
Faust and The Age of Innocence
Waking up to Aliveness
The Age of Innocence vocabulary lists
List of The Age of Innocence reading questions
Discussion guidelines and schedule
 

 

The Age of Innocence
Francine Prose

"Edith Wharton wrote The Age of Innocence—to my mind, her greatest novel—in six months, between September 1919 and March 1920. She was writing about the world—Old New York—in which she had grown up, a world that had already vanished. But writing from a temporal and geographical distance, and through the magnifying lens of retrospect, she was able to enrich her portrait of a society and of a moment in time with everything she had learned and experienced since, with everything she knew about passion and obligation, about the perils of personal fear and social convention, about renunciation and regret, youth and age, memory and fantasy, anticipation and disappointment. America and Europe.     
      "Having read the novel, you can open it at random and be instantly returned to the enthralling if progressively more unhappy inner life of Newland Archer, married to one woman and infatuated with another. You can attend the choreographed dinners and lawn parties, ride in carriages and on ferries, and eavesdrop on seemingly straightforward conversations that conceal—that barely conceal—layers of nuance, subtext, unspoken longing, suppressed declarations of love and overt demarcations of territory. We get to know the characters so well that we know instantly how each major figure is responding to a bit of new information or a changed view of the situation. After a while the author no longer needs to tell us.
     "No one has written more incisively not just about a historical period and a particular social milieu but about something more timeless—the ardor with which we flee and return to the prison of conditioning and convenience. Wharton's graceful sentences create dramatic, populous tableaux and peel back layer after layer of artifice and pretense, of what we say and how we wish to appear, revealing the hidden kernel of what human beings are like, alone and together."

 

 

The Iluminating incident
Edith Wharton

"At every stage in the progress of his tale the novelist must rely on what may be called the illuminating incident to reveal and emphasize the inner meaning of each situation. Illuminating incidents are the magic casements of fiction, its vistas on infinity. They are also the most personal element in any narrative, the author's most direct contribution; and nothing gives such immediate proof of the quality of his imagination--and therefore of the richness of his temperament--as his choices of such episodes....At the conclusion of a novel the illuminating incident need only send its ray backward; but it should send a long enough shaft to meet the light cast forward from the first page....The illuminating incident is not only the proof of the novelist's imaginative sensibility; it is also the best means of giving presentness, immediacy, to his tale."
     "nothing shows the quality of the novelist's imagination more clearly than the incidents he singles out to illuminate the course of events and the inner workings of his people's souls."

Assignments due
read them in full

 

Wednesday, Jan. 24. Vocab. quiz The Age of Innocence list 2.

Monday, January 29. Prose analysis in class. You will upload to turnitin and peergrade assignment 1-26-18, The Age of Innocence prose analysis 2. A 100-point essay grade.

Sunday, February 4. Peergrade, The Age of Innocence prose analysis 2 by 22:00. A 100-point participation grade.

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight
LBH sentence crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Comma usage quick guide
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center
AP Q3 sample essays, Othello
Key AP prose analysis documents

 

 

The Age of Innocence
Robert McCrum

"As with all her New York novels, The Age of Innocence makes an ironic commentary on the cruelties and hypocrisies of Manhattan society in the years before, during and after the Great War. Strangely, when it won the 1921 Pulitzer prize, the judges praised it for revealing 'the wholesome atmosphere of American life and the highest standard of American manners and manhood.' Today, while not as merciless in its analysis as The House of Mirth, Wharton's late masterpiece stands as a fierce indictment of a society estranged from culture and in desperate need of a European sensibility. This had been an issue for American writers since Washington Irving, Melville and Hawthorne. Some critics would say it remains unresolved to this day."

 

 

The Century of the Self
Learn how culture is made

January 15-19

Monday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. No classes. MLK holiday

Tonight.

Ongoing.

 

 

Tuesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. The Age of Innocence prose analysis 1 due today to turnitin and peergrade assignment The Age of Innocence prose analysis 1 by 15:30. Upload when you arrive to class.

The Age of Innocence Chapters 2-4 .

Tonight. Study for vocab. quiz, The Age of Innocence list 2, Chapters 4-9. Sentences might or might not come from the novel. Vocabulary lists now linked under The Age of Innocence reading links in right column.

Ongoing. Sunday, Jan. 21 by 22:00. Peergrade, 1-16-18, The Age of Innocence prose analysis 1. 100-point participation grade for feedback and response to feedback.

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Vocab. quiz The Age of Innocence list 2. Here are zipgrade ids.

Tonight. Read The Age of Innocence Chapters 5-7. Prepare your own thoughts and review the posted discussion questions here.

Ongoing. Sunday, Jan. 21 by 22:00. Peergrade, 1-16-18, The Age of Innocence prose analysis 1. 100-point participation grade for feedback and response to feedback.

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. The Age of Innocence Chapters 5-7.

Tonight. No new reading. Now that the first round of discussions are done, some observations:

1) Know what you think is central in your chapters, what topic is key. That key topic is the focus of the discussion, at least to begin. Discussions can digress a lot and loss focus. Try not to let that happen.

2) Find the passage you think most richly addresses that key topic. Begin with the passage. Have someone read it, then ask us questions about the passage, using those questions to branch out.

3) Interact with students, ask follow up questions; challenge, etc. Don't let students just make a statement then move to another student. Link student responses to the key issue.

4) Preparation. Leading a discussion is tough. You need to know everything about your section and the novel, to have its facts ready to hand so that you can take us to a key passage, add a passage, challenge a student response, etc. Don't underestimate the need for thorough and deep preparation.

5) Try to bring us to clear and full understanding of your key issue by the end of class, a wrap up.

6) Take us to the text. Take us to the text. Take us to the text.

Ongoing. Sunday, Jan. 21 by 22:00. Peergrade, 1-16-18, The Age of Innocence prose analysis 1. 100-point participation grade for feedback and response to feedback.

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. The Age of Innocence through Chapter 7.

Tonight. Read The Age of Innocence Chapters 8-10. Prepare your own thoughts and review the posted discussion questions here..

Ongoing. Sunday, Jan. 21 by 22:00. Peergrade, 1-16-18, The Age of Innocence prose analysis 1. 100-point participation grade for feedback and response to feedback.

The Age of Innocence
reading links

Edith Wharton on writing fiction
Edith Wharton, Confessions of a novelist
Edith Wharton and the problem of sympathy
The New York social season
New York social customs
Madame X, Singer Sargent
Faust and The Age of Innocence
Waking up to Aliveness
The Age of Innocence vocabulary lists
List of The Age of Innocence reading questions
Discussion guidelines and schedule
 

 

The Age of Innocence
Francine Prose

"Edith Wharton wrote The Age of Innocence—to my mind, her greatest novel—in six months, between September 1919 and March 1920. She was writing about the world—Old New York—in which she had grown up, a world that had already vanished. But writing from a temporal and geographical distance, and through the magnifying lens of retrospect, she was able to enrich her portrait of a society and of a moment in time with everything she had learned and experienced since, with everything she knew about passion and obligation, about the perils of personal fear and social convention, about renunciation and regret, youth and age, memory and fantasy, anticipation and disappointment. America and Europe.     
      "Having read the novel, you can open it at random and be instantly returned to the enthralling if progressively more unhappy inner life of Newland Archer, married to one woman and infatuated with another. You can attend the choreographed dinners and lawn parties, ride in carriages and on ferries, and eavesdrop on seemingly straightforward conversations that conceal—that barely conceal—layers of nuance, subtext, unspoken longing, suppressed declarations of love and overt demarcations of territory. We get to know the characters so well that we know instantly how each major figure is responding to a bit of new information or a changed view of the situation. After a while the author no longer needs to tell us.
     "No one has written more incisively not just about a historical period and a particular social milieu but about something more timeless—the ardor with which we flee and return to the prison of conditioning and convenience. Wharton's graceful sentences create dramatic, populous tableaux and peel back layer after layer of artifice and pretense, of what we say and how we wish to appear, revealing the hidden kernel of what human beings are like, alone and together."

 

 

The Iluminating incident
Edith Wharton

"At every stage in the progress of his tale the novelist must rely on what may be called the illuminating incident to reveal and emphasize the inner meaning of each situation. Illuminating incidents are the magic casements of fiction, its vistas on infinity. They are also the most personal element in any narrative, the author's most direct contribution; and nothing gives such immediate proof of the quality of his imagination--and therefore of the richness of his temperament--as his choices of such episodes....At the conclusion of a novel the illuminating incident need only send its ray backward; but it should send a long enough shaft to meet the light cast forward from the first page....The illuminating incident is not only the proof of the novelist's imaginative sensibility; it is also the best means of giving presentness, immediacy, to his tale."
     "nothing shows the quality of the novelist's imagination more clearly than the incidents he singles out to illuminate the course of events and the inner workings of his people's souls."

Assignments due
read them in full

 

Wednesday, Jan. 10. Vocab. quiz The Age of Innocence list 2.

Tuesday, Jan. 16 by 15:30. The Age of Innocence prose analysis 1.A 50-point essay. See assignment details here. No paper copy. Upload your essay to turnitin and peergrade assignments 1-16-18, The Age of Innocence prose analysis 1. (Remember, I'm using points this semester to give different assignments different weights. Be attentive to that.) Before you submit your final draft, review your previous prose analysis essays. What did you do well? What do you need to improve? Learn from each writing assignment and the feedback you receive. Per ardua ad astra.

Sunday, Jan. 21 by 22:00. Peergrade, 1-16-18, The Age of Innocence prose analysis 1. A participation grade for feedback and response to feedback.

 


Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight
LBH sentence crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Comma usage quick guide
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center
AP Q3 sample essays, Othello
Key AP prose analysis documents

 

 

The Age of Innocence
Robert McCrum

"As with all her New York novels, The Age of Innocence makes an ironic commentary on the cruelties and hypocrisies of Manhattan society in the years before, during and after the Great War. Strangely, when it won the 1921 Pulitzer prize, the judges praised it for revealing 'the wholesome atmosphere of American life and the highest standard of American manners and manhood.' Today, while not as merciless in its analysis as The House of Mirth, Wharton's late masterpiece stands as a fierce indictment of a society estranged from culture and in desperate need of a European sensibility. This had been an issue for American writers since Washington Irving, Melville and Hawthorne. Some critics would say it remains unresolved to this day."

 

 

The Century of the Self
Learn how culture is made

January 8-12

Monday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. A welcome, a review of policy and expectations and my new grading scheme. How we'll do The Age of Innocence. Writing on The Age of Innocence, a 50-point quiz..

Tonight. Watch the point of view lesson in right column. What do you learn about point of view? Read The Age of Innocence discussion guide and reading schedule in its entirety. Know what's expected and what to do for a successful discussion. Also, check the schedule for conflicts. Know for certain what's written in red atop the reading schedule.

Ongoing. The Age of Innocence prose analysis 1 due Tuesday.

 

 

Tuesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. The Age of Innocence Chapter 1.

Tonight. Study for 25-point vocab. quiz. Sentences might or might not come from the novel. Vocabulary lists now linked under The Age of Innocence reading links in right column.

Ongoing. The Age of Innocence prose analysis 1 due Tuesday.

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Vocab. quiz The Age of Innocence list 1. Here are zipgrade ids.

Tonight.

Ongoing. The Age of Innocence prose analysis 1 due Tuesday.

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. The Age of Innocence Chapter 1.

Tonight. See updates to The Age of Innocence discussion guide and reading schedule.

Ongoing. The Age of Innocence prose analysis 1 due Tuesday.

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. The Age of Innocence Chapter 1.

Tonight. For Tuesday, read Chapters 2-4.

Ongoing. The Age of Innocence prose analysis 1 due Tuesday.

The Age of Innocence
reading links

Edith Wharton on writing fiction
Edith Wharton, Confessions of a novelist
Edith Wharton and the problem of sympathy
The New York social season
New York social customs
Madame X, Singer Sargent
Faust and The Age of Innocence
Waking up to Aliveness
The Age of Innocence vocabulary lists
List of The Age of Innocence reading questions
Discussion guidelines and schedule
 

 

Point of view lesson

 

 

The Age of Innocence
Francine Prose

"Edith Wharton wrote The Age of Innocence—to my mind, her greatest novel—in six months, between September 1919 and March 1920. She was writing about the world—Old New York—in which she had grown up, a world that had already vanished. But writing from a temporal and geographical distance, and through the magnifying lens of retrospect, she was able to enrich her portrait of a society and of a moment in time with everything she had learned and experienced since, with everything she knew about passion and obligation, about the perils of personal fear and social convention, about renunciation and regret, youth and age, memory and fantasy, anticipation and disappointment. America and Europe.     
      "Having read the novel, you can open it at random and be instantly returned to the enthralling if progressively more unhappy inner life of Newland Archer, married to one woman and infatuated with another. You can attend the choreographed dinners and lawn parties, ride in carriages and on ferries, and eavesdrop on seemingly straightforward conversations that conceal—that barely conceal—layers of nuance, subtext, unspoken longing, suppressed declarations of love and overt demarcations of territory. We get to know the characters so well that we know instantly how each major figure is responding to a bit of new information or a changed view of the situation. After a while the author no longer needs to tell us.
     "No one has written more incisively not just about a historical period and a particular social milieu but about something more timeless—the ardor with which we flee and return to the prison of conditioning and convenience. Wharton's graceful sentences create dramatic, populous tableaux and peel back layer after layer of artifice and pretense, of what we say and how we wish to appear, revealing the hidden kernel of what human beings are like, alone and together."

 

 

The Iluminating incident
Edith Wharton

"At every stage in the progress of his tale the novelist must rely on what may be called the illuminating incident to reveal and emphasize the inner meaning of each situation. Illuminating incidents are the magic casements of fiction, its vistas on infinity. They are also the most personal element in any narrative, the author's most direct contribution; and nothing gives such immediate proof of the quality of his imagination--and therefore of the richness of his temperament--as his choices of such episodes....At the conclusion of a novel the illuminating incident need only send its ray backward; but it should send a long enough shaft to meet the light cast forward from the first page....The illuminating incident is not only the proof of the novelist's imaginative sensibility; it is also the best means of giving presentness, immediacy, to his tale."
     "nothing shows the quality of the novelist's imagination more clearly than the incidents he singles out to illuminate the course of events and the inner workings of his people's souls."

Assignments due
read them in full

 

Monday, Jan. 8. The Age of Innocence 50-point quiz in class. Upload to turnitin assignment 1-8-18, The Age of Innocence, initial thoughts chapter 1. Due by end of class.

Wednesday, Jan. 10. Vocab. quiz The Age of Innocence list 1.

Tuesday, Jan. 16 by 15:30. The Age of Innocence prose analysis 1.A 50-point essay. See assignment details here. No paper copy. Upload your essay to turnitin and peergrade assignments 1-16-18, The Age of Innocence prose analysis 1. (Remember, I'm using points this semester to give different assignments different weights. Be attentive to that.) Before you submit your final draft, review your previous prose analysis essays. What did you do well? What do you need to improve? Learn from each writing assignment and the feedback you receive. Per ardua ad astra.

Sunday, Jan. 21 by 22:00. Peergrade, 1-16-18, The Age of Innocence prose analysis 1. A participation grade for feedback and response to feedback.

 


Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight
LBH sentence crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Comma usage quick guide
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center
AP Q3 sample essays, Othello
Key AP prose analysis documents

 

 

The Age of Innocence
Robert McCrum

"As with all her New York novels, The Age of Innocence makes an ironic commentary on the cruelties and hypocrisies of Manhattan society in the years before, during and after the Great War. Strangely, when it won the 1921 Pulitzer prize, the judges praised it for revealing 'the wholesome atmosphere of American life and the highest standard of American manners and manhood.' Today, while not as merciless in its analysis as The House of Mirth, Wharton's late masterpiece stands as a fierce indictment of a society estranged from culture and in desperate need of a European sensibility. This had been an issue for American writers since Washington Irving, Melville and Hawthorne. Some critics would say it remains unresolved to this day."

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