AP Literature fall archive

December 4-8

Monday

juanfelipeherrera11 

 

 

 

 

Today. The Death of Ivan Ilych prose analysis #1 due today.

The Death of Ivan Ilych through Chapter 5. If you've not yet read the essay assignment and chosen a topic, do so now. Read the rest of the novel with a clear purpose.

Introduce writing opening ¶s. Bring Trimble, Writing with Style.

Join AP Lit 2018 class at Quizlet. I'll use it for vocab., etc., from now on.

Tonight. Read The Death of Ivan Ilych Chapters 6 & 7.

Ongoing. The Death of Ivan Ilych full draft due Monday, Decermber 11. The Death of Ivan Ilych essay due Thursday, December 14.

 

 

Tuesday

wislawaszymborska12 

 

 

 

 

Today. Discuss The Death of Ivan Ilych through Chapter 7.

Tonight. Read The Death of Ivan Ilych Chapter 8.

Ongoing. Peergrade, The Death of Ivan Ilych prose analysis #1, Sunday by 22:00. The Death of Ivan Ilych full draft due Monday, Decermber 11. The Death of Ivan Ilych essay due Thursday, December 14.

 

 

Wednesday

charlessimic11 

 

 

 

 

Today. Discuss The Death of Ivan Ilych through Chapter 8.

Tonight. Read The Death of Ivan Ilych Chapters 9 & 10. Write a stronger, more precise TH/RTP sentence for the prose analysis #1 ¶ on pages 4-5 and upload it to Peergrade assignment The Death of Ivan Ilych TH/RTP revised.

Ongoing. Sunday, December 10. Peergrade, The Death of Ivan Ilych prose analysis #1. The Death of Ivan Ilych full draft due Monday, Decermber 11. The Death of Ivan Ilych essay due Thursday, December 14. .

 

 

Thursday

augustwilson11 

 

 

 

 

Today. Discuss The Death of Ivan Ilych through Chapter 10.

Tonight. Read The Death of Ivan Ilych Chapters 11 & 12.

Ongoing. Sunday, December 10. Peergrade, The Death of Ivan Ilych prose analysis #1. The Death of Ivan Ilych full draft due Monday, Decermber 11. The Death of Ivan Ilych essay due Thursday, December 14. .

 

Friday

cormacmccarthy11 

 

 

 

 

Today. Discuss The Death of Ivan Ilych.

Tonight. Sunday, December 10. Peergrade, The Death of Ivan Ilych prose analysis #1. The Death of Ivan Ilych essay due Monday. Have it ready to upload to Peergrade in class.

Ongoing. The Death of Ivan Ilych full draft due Monday, Decermber 11. The Death of Ivan Ilych essay due Thursday, December 14. .

Assignments due
read them in full

stephenkingworking10

 

Sunday, December 10. Peergrade, The Death of Ivan Ilych prose analysis #1. A participation grade.

Monday, December 11. Full draft of The Death of Ivan Ilych essay ready to upload to Peergrade in class. We will spend Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday working on the essay in class. Take full advantage of the opportunity to craft your finest essay.

Thursday, December 14. The Death of Ivan Ilych essay. Details on this assignment page. Your final exam.

 

 

Have this exact edition of
The Age of Innocence ready
during Christmas break

ageofinnocencecover

 

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight
LBH sentence crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center
AP sample essays, Othello
Key AP prose analysis documents

 

 

Tolstoy and Dostoevsky

tolstoydostoevsky4

Andrew Kaufman, author of Understanding Tolstoy and Lecturer in Slavic Languages and Literature, University of Virginia.

"All mediocre novelists are alike; every great novelist is great in his own way. Which is why the choice between nineteenth-century Russia's two supreme prose writers ultimately boils down to the question of which kind of greatness resonates with a particular reader. My own sympathies are with Tolstoy, and even my criteria for judging a work of fiction, I admit, are relentlessly Tolstoyan.
     "'The goal of the artist,' Tolstoy wrote, 'is not to solve a question irrefutably, but to force people to love life in all its countless, inexhaustible manifestations.' By this standard Tolstoy's novels succeed where Dostoevsky's fall short.
     "True, Dostoevsky saw and felt modern experience in all of its isolating, tragic depth. He showed the obsessive power of ideas and the psychological crises, cracks, and explosions of the soul that have become familiar in our modern world. What he doesn't do, however, is make you love life in all its manifestations. In fact, when he tries to do so, he reveals his deficiencies.
     "At the end of Crime and Punishment Raskolnikov flings himself at the feet of Sonya, who has followed him to Siberia where he is serving his sentence for double homicide. Sonya jumps up, looks at him and trembles. 'Infinite happiness lit up in her eyes; she understood, and for her there was no longer any doubt that he loved her, loved her infinitely, and that at last the moment had come'— If this smacks of modern soap opera or those maudlin French novels Dostoevsky was raised on, that's because it is melodrama. Sonya's infinite love is an ideal, the moment that has supposedly come, an abstraction.
     "What modern readers need, Tolstoy believed, is not more lurching after 'infinite happiness or the Great Idea,' as Stepan Trofimovich, near the end of The Demons, claims to have discovered, but the ability to embrace an imperfect reality. The author of Anna Karenina teaches us how to seek meaning not through grandiose romantic strivings, like Anna and Vronsky, but within the limits of imperfect social and family structures, like Kitty and Levin.
     "Tolstoy's novels depict the norms and continuities of human behavior by means of grand narratives that expand slowly over time and against the backdrop of vast natural tableaus. 'As is usually the case' and 'such as often occurs' are phrases you encounter frequently in Tolstoy. Dostoevsky's world, by contrast, is one in which you can come home one evening and 'suddenly' find an axe buried in your skull. Life is always on the verge of imploding on itself. Tragedy is just around the corner, or in your living room.
     "Tolstoy's living room is a place where people, well, live. It's where dark-eyed, voluble twelve-year old Natasha Rostova comes running with doll in hand, or where, a decade later, she enjoys with Pierre one of those endearingly mundane conversations between wife and husband about nothing and everything.
     "'I am a realist in a higher sense,' Dostoevsky rightfully claimed. But Tolstoy was a realist in the total sense. 'The hero of my tale is Truth,' he wrote. And that truth is one every generation recognizes as its own, not just those in a state of social crisis or existential despair. If Dostoevsky urges us to reach for the heavens, then Tolstoy teaches us by artistic example how we may touch the transcendent here and now in our messy, fleeting world."

The Death of Ivan Ilych
reading links

ivanilychpevearcover8

Satire by David Mikics
Parody, Satire by Edward Hirsch
Realism by David Mikics
Comedy by David Mikics
Study questions
Tolstoy, searching for meaning in life
Tolstoy, greatest writer ever?
Five curious facts about Tolstoy
See Yasnaya Polyana, Tostoy's estate
Seneca, Asthma, a Stoic take on death
Montaigne on how to live
Montaigne and death

 

 

Point of view lesson

 

 

Nabokov on Tolstoy's style

AMAGNUMIG11 

 

 

 

"You may have seen, you must have seen, some of those awful text books written not by educators but by educationalists—by people who talk about books instead of talking within books. You may have been told by them that the chief aim of a great writer, and indeed the main clue to his greatness, is 'simplicity.' Traitors, not teachers. In reading exam papers written by misled students, of both sexes, about this or that author, I have often come across such phrases—probably recollections from more tender years of schooling—as 'his style is simple' or 'his style is clear and simple' or 'his style is beautiful and simple' or 'his style is quite beautiful and simple.' But rememberthat 'simplicity' is buncombe. No major writer is simple. The Saturday Evening Post is simple. Journalese is simple. Upton Lewis is simple. Mom is simple. Digests are simple. Damnation is simple. But Tolstoys and Melvilles are not simple.
     "One peculiar feature of Tolstoy's style is what I shall term the 'groping purist.' In describing a meditation, emotion, or tangible object, Tolstoy follows the contours of the thought, the emotion, or the object until he is perfectly satisfied with his re-creation, his rendering. This involves what we might call creative repetitions, a compact series of repetitive statements, coming one immediately after the other, each more expressive, each closer to Tolstoy's meaning. He gropes, he unwraps the verbal parcel for its inner sense, he peels the apple of the phrase, he tries to say it one way, then a better way, he gropes, he stalls, he toys, he Tolstoys with words.
     "Another feature of his style is his manner of weaving striking details into the story, the freshness of the descriptions of physical states. Nobody in the eighties in Russia wrote like that. The story was a forerunner of Russian modernism just before the dull and conventional Soviet era. If there is the fable noted, there is too a tender, poetical intonation here and there, and there is the tense mental monologue, the stream of consciousness technique that he had already invented for the description of Anna's last journey."

 

 

The changing nature of satire
(watch the video here)

"Donald Trump's presidency is ushering in a new era in American politics, and with it a new era in political satire: the age of post-truth. With Trump railing against the press on a seemingly daily basis (and tweeting his own facts), satire is poised to play an important role during his presidency, but what will post-truth satire look like in Trump's America?
"Though it is relatively young, satirizing presidential politics has undergone a radical shift in its roughly fifty-year history. Many of the earliest presidential satirists sought to illuminate the absurd within the real. Through the latter half of the 20th century, presidential satirists mainly worked to amplify their targets, making them more extreme, more out of touch, more absurd. The truth these satirists sought was not found in the real, but in the absurd amplification of the real.
     "Chevy Chase's Gerald Ford on Christmas Eve is a prime example. In the sketch, Ford's clumsiness and general buffoonery are amplified—he starts his fireside address early, cuts ornaments off the tree, hangs stockings upside down, and of course, falls over trying to put the star on the tree. Similarly, Phil Hartman's Bill Clinton voraciously eats all the McDonald's he can get his hands on. His one-on-one charm and policy knowledge are on full display, as is his uncontrollable appetite (and not just for food). Both of these examples push absurdity in order to reveal truths about the two men.
     "After 9/11 and during George W. Bush's presidency satire began to shift. The truth became harder to find, thanks in part to the secrecy of the Bush White House and the patriotically correct— reporting of the media, who seemed tentative to question lest they be seen as unpatriotic. Cable news went all in, often sensationalizing the news rather than reporting it. The Daily Show and The Colbert Report stepped into this truth vacuum."
     

November 27-December 1

Monday

juanfelipeherrera10 

 

 

 

 

Today. Point of view, style, The Death of Ivan Ilych Chapters 1 & 2. Some close reading of passages Introduce prose analysis essay due Monday.

Tonight. Print and read this sample AP prompt from 2011. Analyze the passage through the prompt's lens. Think about how you might write an essay. Follow these guidelines:
     1. Define prompt's demands and expectations, both thematically and technically. What theme are you meant to understand? What devices do see making meaning? Keep both theme and device in mind as you read the passage. Your essay's mission is to analyze how literary technique/device create and enrich the thematic meaning.
     2. Read the passage twice. Once just for overall plot and theme. Once through prompt's lens. Identify the devices in play and how they contribute to creating thematic meaning; and then define a sharper thematic insight. Note shifts, contrasts/comparisons, juxtapositions, repetitions—the big organizational patterns. How do those big patterns contribute to thematic meaning?
     3. Decide how to structure your essay. Many top-scoring essays follow the passage's movements, the "plot" and the big organizational patterns, noting shifts, etc., and linking them to theme and device.

Ongoing. The Death of Ivan Ilych prose analysis #1 due Monday.

 

 

Tuesday

wislawaszymborska11 

 

 

 

 

Today. Sample AP prose analysis passage. Theme and device.

Tonight. Print and read these sample AP essays. You need only read the 9, 8, 7, and maybe the 6.

Ongoing. The Death of Ivan Ilych prose analysis #1 due Monday.

 

 

Wednesday

charlessimic10 

 

 

 

 

Today. Sample essays. Define how top-scoring essays work.

Tonight. Read The Death of Ivan Ilych Chapter 3. Consider these questions: Why is the year 1880 the hardest of Ivan's life? Does his trouble seem that terrible to you? What makes it so hard, then, for Ivan Ilych? How does Ivan Ilych react to the hardship and its resolution? Is his trouble, in fact, resolved? In what important ways is Ivan Ilych mistaken and about what? How does Tolstoy's style enrich theme? How does Tolstoy make us feel Ivan's anguish? Find at least two rich examples and analyze them.

Ongoing. The Death of Ivan Ilych prose analysis #1 due Monday.

 

 

Thursday

augustwilson10 

 

 

 

 

Today. The Death of Ivan Ilych Chapter 3.

Tonight. Nothing. Open House. Bring Trimble, Writing with Style to class on Friday. We'll learn about writing opening ¶s.

Ongoing. The Death of Ivan Ilych prose analysis #1 due Monday.

 

Friday

cormacmccarthy10 

 

 

 

 

Today. The Death of Ivan Ilych through Chapter 3.

Tonight. Read The Death of Ivan Ilych Chapters 4 & 5. How has the point of view changed? What changes does Ivan's illness cause? How might we think thematically about his illness? Note how different characters understand Ivan's illness and how they respond to him and his questions. How is Ivan changing? How does Tolstoy make scary and very moving Ivan's struggle with the knowledge that he is dying? Find some examples passages and define the devices that make them work.

Ongoing. The Death of Ivan Ilych prose analysis #1 due Monday. No paper copy this time. You'll just upload to Peergrade and Turnitin.

Assignments due
read them in full

stephenkingworking9

 

Monday, December 4. The Death of Ivan Ilych prose analysis #1.No paper copy this time. You'll just upload to Peergrade and Turnitin.

Monday, December 11. The Death of Ivan Ilych essay.

 

 

The Death of Ivan Ilych
vocabulary lists

The Death of Ivan Ilych 1-3
The Death of Ivan Ilych 4-12
zipgrade ids

 

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight
LBH sentence crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center
AP sample essays, Othello
Key AP prose analysis documents

 

 

Tolstoy and Dostoevsky

tolstoydostoevsky3

Andrew Kaufman, author of Understanding Tolstoy and Lecturer in Slavic Languages and Literature, University of Virginia.

"All mediocre novelists are alike; every great novelist is great in his own way. Which is why the choice between nineteenth-century Russia's two supreme prose writers ultimately boils down to the question of which kind of greatness resonates with a particular reader. My own sympathies are with Tolstoy, and even my criteria for judging a work of fiction, I admit, are relentlessly Tolstoyan.
     "'The goal of the artist,' Tolstoy wrote, 'is not to solve a question irrefutably, but to force people to love life in all its countless, inexhaustible manifestations.' By this standard Tolstoy's novels succeed where Dostoevsky's fall short.
     "True, Dostoevsky saw and felt modern experience in all of its isolating, tragic depth. He showed the obsessive power of ideas and the psychological crises, cracks, and explosions of the soul that have become familiar in our modern world. What he doesn't do, however, is make you love life in all its manifestations. In fact, when he tries to do so, he reveals his deficiencies.
     "At the end of Crime and Punishment Raskolnikov flings himself at the feet of Sonya, who has followed him to Siberia where he is serving his sentence for double homicide. Sonya jumps up, looks at him and trembles. 'Infinite happiness lit up in her eyes; she understood, and for her there was no longer any doubt that he loved her, loved her infinitely, and that at last the moment had come'— If this smacks of modern soap opera or those maudlin French novels Dostoevsky was raised on, that's because it is melodrama. Sonya's infinite love is an ideal, the moment that has supposedly come, an abstraction.
     "What modern readers need, Tolstoy believed, is not more lurching after 'infinite happiness or the Great Idea,' as Stepan Trofimovich, near the end of The Demons, claims to have discovered, but the ability to embrace an imperfect reality. The author of Anna Karenina teaches us how to seek meaning not through grandiose romantic strivings, like Anna and Vronsky, but within the limits of imperfect social and family structures, like Kitty and Levin.
     "Tolstoy's novels depict the norms and continuities of human behavior by means of grand narratives that expand slowly over time and against the backdrop of vast natural tableaus. 'As is usually the case' and 'such as often occurs' are phrases you encounter frequently in Tolstoy. Dostoevsky's world, by contrast, is one in which you can come home one evening and 'suddenly' find an axe buried in your skull. Life is always on the verge of imploding on itself. Tragedy is just around the corner, or in your living room.
     "Tolstoy's living room is a place where people, well, live. It's where dark-eyed, voluble twelve-year old Natasha Rostova comes running with doll in hand, or where, a decade later, she enjoys with Pierre one of those endearingly mundane conversations between wife and husband about nothing and everything.
     "'I am a realist in a higher sense,' Dostoevsky rightfully claimed. But Tolstoy was a realist in the total sense. 'The hero of my tale is Truth,' he wrote. And that truth is one every generation recognizes as its own, not just those in a state of social crisis or existential despair. If Dostoevsky urges us to reach for the heavens, then Tolstoy teaches us by artistic example how we may touch the transcendent here and now in our messy, fleeting world."

The Death of Ivan Ilych
reading links

ivanilychpevearcover7

Satire by David Mikics
Parody, Satire by Edward Hirsch
Realism by David Mikics
Comedy by David Mikics
Study questions
Tolstoy, searching for meaning in life
Tolstoy, greatest writer ever?
Five curious facts about Tolstoy
See Yasnaya Polyana, Tostoy's estate
Seneca, Asthma, a Stoic take on death
Montaigne on how to live
Montaigne and death

 

 

Learn from a Korean potter

 

 

Nabokov on Tolstoy's style

AMAGNUMIG10 

 

 

 

"You may have seen, you must have seen, some of those awful text books written not by educators but by educationalists—by people who talk about books instead of talking within books. You may have been told by them that the chief aim of a great writer, and indeed the main clue to his greatness, is 'simplicity.' Traitors, not teachers. In reading exam papers written by misled students, of both sexes, about this or that author, I have often come across such phrases—probably recollections from more tender years of schooling—as 'his style is simple' or 'his style is clear and simple' or 'his style is beautiful and simple' or 'his style is quite beautiful and simple.' But rememberthat 'simplicity' is buncombe. No major writer is simple. The Saturday Evening Post is simple. Journalese is simple. Upton Lewis is simple. Mom is simple. Digests are simple. Damnation is simple. But Tolstoys and Melvilles are not simple.
     "One peculiar feature of Tolstoy's style is what I shall term the 'groping purist.' In describing a meditation, emotion, or tangible object, Tolstoy follows the contours of the thought, the emotion, or the object until he is perfectly satisfied with his re-creation, his rendering. This involves what we might call creative repetitions, a compact series of repetitive statements, coming one immediately after the other, each more expressive, each closer to Tolstoy's meaning. He gropes, he unwraps the verbal parcel for its inner sense, he peels the apple of the phrase, he tries to say it one way, then a better way, he gropes, he stalls, he toys, he Tolstoys with words.
     "Another feature of his style is his manner of weaving striking details into the story, the freshness of the descriptions of physical states. Nobody in the eighties in Russia wrote like that. The story was a forerunner of Russian modernism just before the dull and conventional Soviet era. If there is the fable noted, there is too a tender, poetical intonation here and there, and there is the tense mental monologue, the stream of consciousness technique that he had already invented for the description of Anna's last journey."

 

 

The changing nature of satire
(watch the video here)

"Donald Trump's presidency is ushering in a new era in American politics, and with it a new era in political satire: the age of post-truth. With Trump railing against the press on a seemingly daily basis (and tweeting his own facts), satire is poised to play an important role during his presidency, but what will post-truth satire look like in Trump's America?
"Though it is relatively young, satirizing presidential politics has undergone a radical shift in its roughly fifty-year history. Many of the earliest presidential satirists sought to illuminate the absurd within the real. Through the latter half of the 20th century, presidential satirists mainly worked to amplify their targets, making them more extreme, more out of touch, more absurd. The truth these satirists sought was not found in the real, but in the absurd amplification of the real.
     "Chevy Chase's Gerald Ford on Christmas Eve is a prime example. In the sketch, Ford's clumsiness and general buffoonery are amplified—he starts his fireside address early, cuts ornaments off the tree, hangs stockings upside down, and of course, falls over trying to put the star on the tree. Similarly, Phil Hartman's Bill Clinton voraciously eats all the McDonald's he can get his hands on. His one-on-one charm and policy knowledge are on full display, as is his uncontrollable appetite (and not just for food). Both of these examples push absurdity in order to reveal truths about the two men.
     "After 9/11 and during George W. Bush's presidency satire began to shift. The truth became harder to find, thanks in part to the secrecy of the Bush White House and the patriotically correct— reporting of the media, who seemed tentative to question lest they be seen as unpatriotic. Cable news went all in, often sensationalizing the news rather than reporting it. The Daily Show and The Colbert Report stepped into this truth vacuum."
     

November 13-17

Monday

juanfelipeherrera9 

 

 

 

 

Today. Crime and Punishment essays returned. Grading notes. Tolstoy introduction. Style introduction. Exposition introduction. The Death of Ivan Ilych Chapter 1 ¶ 1.

Thoughout our reading of The Death of Ivan Ilych we will introduce some fundamental elements of fiction. You will read introductions to those elements and note them in action in Tolstoy's novel. For each night's reading, I will pose a few additional questions for your consideration and you will write at least one thoughtful question of your own. I expect you to have prepared responses/thoughts about the questions I pose.
     I will be checking your copy of the novel for thoughtful annotations and asking you to begin our discussion with your questions. These annotation checks will be one quiz grade each.

Tonight. Read the rest of Chapter 1. Define the novel's thematic subject/s and the beginnings of its thinking about those subjects. Where does Chapter 1 convey its thinking about its theme? What are some key moments? What is your view is the richest thematic moment? Who is the focus of Chapter 1's presentation of theme? Is the novel funny/comedic—both in evoking laughter and in literary form? Why does Tolstoy begin his story with Ivan's death? How does Tolstoy's style enrich the novel's theme?
     If you didn't read the style doc, do so tonight. It's linked on Friday of last week and in the Key Ap prose analysis documents link beneath Essay documents in middle column.

Ongoing. Wednesday, November 15. Peergrade AP Question 3 ICE REVISION due by 22:00.

 

 

Tuesday

wislawaszymborska10 

 

 

 

 

Today. The Death of Ivan Ilych Chapter 1. Style and theme.

Tonight. Study for The Death of Ivan Ilych 4-12 Vocabulary Quiz.

Ongoing. Wednesday, November 15. Peergrade AP Question 3 ICE REVISION due by 22:00.

 

 

Wednesday

charlessimic9 

 

 

 

 

Today. Vocab. Quiz, The Death of Ivan Ilych 4-12.

Tonight. Get some sleep.

Peergrade AP Question 3 ICE REVISION due by 22:00.

Ongoing.

 

 

Thursday

augustwilson9 

 

 

 

 

Today. The Death of Ivan Ilych Chapter 1.

Tonight. Read The Death of Ivan Ilych Chapter 2.
     We now move to the story of Ivan Ilych's life. The first sentence could not be more direct. How does the chapter develop the first sentence? What makes Ivan Ilych's life most terrible? Define specific reasons, trying to get at the most fundamental ones you can. Why the sequence of adjectives, simple/ordinary/terrible? (Some translators include a "therefore" before terrible, increasing the cause/effect relationship between the adjectives.)
     How does Tolstoy's style enrich theme? Find at least one rich example and analyze it.

Ongoing.

 

Friday

cormacmccarthy9 

 

 

 

 

Today. The Death of Ivan Ilych Chapter 2.

Tonight. Read the point of view document inside the Key AP prose analysis documents folder linked beneath Essay documents heading in middle column. Define the narrative point of view of The Death of Ivan Ilych. Why that point of view? How does it work to convey and enrich theme? Find at least two examples in chapters 1 & 2 that show point of view in interesting action.

Ongoing. Happy Thanksgiving. Get some rest. Have some fun. Come back rejuvenated, refreshed, replenished.

Assignments due
read them in full

stephenkingworking8

 

Wednesday, November 15. Vocab. Quiz, The Death of Ivan Ilych 4-12.

Wednesday, November 15. Peergrade, AP Question 3 ICE REVISION by 22:00.

 

 

The Death of Ivan Ilych
vocabulary lists

The Death of Ivan Ilych 1-3
The Death of Ivan Ilych 4-12
zipgrade ids

 

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight
LBH sentence crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center
AP sample essays, Othello
Key AP prose analysis documents

 

 

Tolstoy and Dostoevsky

tolstoydostoevsky2

Andrew Kaufman, author of Understanding Tolstoy and Lecturer in Slavic Languages and Literature, University of Virginia.

"All mediocre novelists are alike; every great novelist is great in his own way. Which is why the choice between nineteenth-century Russia's two supreme prose writers ultimately boils down to the question of which kind of greatness resonates with a particular reader. My own sympathies are with Tolstoy, and even my criteria for judging a work of fiction, I admit, are relentlessly Tolstoyan.
     "'The goal of the artist,' Tolstoy wrote, 'is not to solve a question irrefutably, but to force people to love life in all its countless, inexhaustible manifestations.' By this standard Tolstoy's novels succeed where Dostoevsky's fall short.
     "True, Dostoevsky saw and felt modern experience in all of its isolating, tragic depth. He showed the obsessive power of ideas and the psychological crises, cracks, and explosions of the soul that have become familiar in our modern world. What he doesn't do, however, is make you love life in all its manifestations. In fact, when he tries to do so, he reveals his deficiencies.
     "At the end of Crime and Punishment Raskolnikov flings himself at the feet of Sonya, who has followed him to Siberia where he is serving his sentence for double homicide. Sonya jumps up, looks at him and trembles. 'Infinite happiness lit up in her eyes; she understood, and for her there was no longer any doubt that he loved her, loved her infinitely, and that at last the moment had come'— If this smacks of modern soap opera or those maudlin French novels Dostoevsky was raised on, that's because it is melodrama. Sonya's infinite love is an ideal, the moment that has supposedly come, an abstraction.
     "What modern readers need, Tolstoy believed, is not more lurching after 'infinite happiness or the Great Idea,' as Stepan Trofimovich, near the end of The Demons, claims to have discovered, but the ability to embrace an imperfect reality. The author of Anna Karenina teaches us how to seek meaning not through grandiose romantic strivings, like Anna and Vronsky, but within the limits of imperfect social and family structures, like Kitty and Levin.
     "Tolstoy's novels depict the norms and continuities of human behavior by means of grand narratives that expand slowly over time and against the backdrop of vast natural tableaus. 'As is usually the case' and 'such as often occurs' are phrases you encounter frequently in Tolstoy. Dostoevsky's world, by contrast, is one in which you can come home one evening and 'suddenly' find an axe buried in your skull. Life is always on the verge of imploding on itself. Tragedy is just around the corner, or in your living room.
     "Tolstoy's living room is a place where people, well, live. It's where dark-eyed, voluble twelve-year old Natasha Rostova comes running with doll in hand, or where, a decade later, she enjoys with Pierre one of those endearingly mundane conversations between wife and husband about nothing and everything.
     "'I am a realist in a higher sense,' Dostoevsky rightfully claimed. But Tolstoy was a realist in the total sense. 'The hero of my tale is Truth,' he wrote. And that truth is one every generation recognizes as its own, not just those in a state of social crisis or existential despair. If Dostoevsky urges us to reach for the heavens, then Tolstoy teaches us by artistic example how we may touch the transcendent here and now in our messy, fleeting world."

The Death of Ivan Ilych
reading links

ivanilychpevearcover6

Satire by David Mikics
Parody, Satire by Edward Hirsch
Realism by David Mikics
Comedy by David Mikics
Study questions
Tolstoy, searching for meaning in life
Tolstoy, greatest writer ever?
Five curious facts about Tolstoy
See Yasnaya Polyana, Tostoy's estate
Seneca, Asthma, a Stoic take on death
Montaigne on how to live
Montaigne and death

 

 

Learn from a Korean potter

 

 

Nabokov on Tolstoy's style

AMAGNUMIG9 

 

 

 

"You may have seen, you must have seen, some of those awful text books written not by educators but by educationalists—by people who talk about books instead of talking within books. You may have been told by them that the chief aim of a great writer, and indeed the main clue to his greatness, is 'simplicity.' Traitors, not teachers. In reading exam papers written by misled students, of both sexes, about this or that author, I have often come across such phrases—probably recollections from more tender years of schooling—as 'his style is simple' or 'his style is clear and simple' or 'his style is beautiful and simple' or 'his style is quite beautiful and simple.' But rememberthat 'simplicity' is buncombe. No major writer is simple. The Saturday Evening Post is simple. Journalese is simple. Upton Lewis is simple. Mom is simple. Digests are simple. Damnation is simple. But Tolstoys and Melvilles are not simple.
     "One peculiar feature of Tolstoy's style is what I shall term the 'groping purist.' In describing a meditation, emotion, or tangible object, Tolstoy follows the contours of the thought, the emotion, or the object until he is perfectly satisfied with his re-creation, his rendering. This involves what we might call creative repetitions, a compact series of repetitive statements, coming one immediately after the other, each more expressive, each closer to Tolstoy's meaning. He gropes, he unwraps the verbal parcel for its inner sense, he peels the apple of the phrase, he tries to say it one way, then a better way, he gropes, he stalls, he toys, he Tolstoys with words.
     "Another feature of his style is his manner of weaving striking details into the story, the freshness of the descriptions of physical states. Nobody in the eighties in Russia wrote like that. The story was a forerunner of Russian modernism just before the dull and conventional Soviet era. If there is the fable noted, there is too a tender, poetical intonation here and there, and there is the tense mental monologue, the stream of consciousness technique that he had already invented for the description of Anna's last journey."

 

 

The changing nature of satire
(watch the video here)

"Donald Trump's presidency is ushering in a new era in American politics, and with it a new era in political satire: the age of post-truth. With Trump railing against the press on a seemingly daily basis (and tweeting his own facts), satire is poised to play an important role during his presidency, but what will post-truth satire look like in Trump's America?
"Though it is relatively young, satirizing presidential politics has undergone a radical shift in its roughly fifty-year history. Many of the earliest presidential satirists sought to illuminate the absurd within the real. Through the latter half of the 20th century, presidential satirists mainly worked to amplify their targets, making them more extreme, more out of touch, more absurd. The truth these satirists sought was not found in the real, but in the absurd amplification of the real.
     "Chevy Chase's Gerald Ford on Christmas Eve is a prime example. In the sketch, Ford's clumsiness and general buffoonery are amplified—he starts his fireside address early, cuts ornaments off the tree, hangs stockings upside down, and of course, falls over trying to put the star on the tree. Similarly, Phil Hartman's Bill Clinton voraciously eats all the McDonald's he can get his hands on. His one-on-one charm and policy knowledge are on full display, as is his uncontrollable appetite (and not just for food). Both of these examples push absurdity in order to reveal truths about the two men.
     "After 9/11 and during George W. Bush's presidency satire began to shift. The truth became harder to find, thanks in part to the secrecy of the Bush White House and the patriotically correct— reporting of the media, who seemed tentative to question lest they be seen as unpatriotic. Cable news went all in, often sensationalizing the news rather than reporting it. The Daily Show and The Colbert Report stepped into this truth vacuum."
     

November 6-10

Monday

juanfelipeherrera8 

 

 

 

 

Today. Practice in-class essay AP open-ended question/question #3. You will use Crime and Punishment to answer that question. You will use your iPad to write the essay and to upload it to Peergrade assignment Crime and Punishment AP Open-ended prompt ICE at the end of class.

Tonight. Enjoy a rare light week.

Ongoing. Friday, November 10. Revised AP question #3 ICE in class. Upload to Crime and Punishment AP question #3 ICE REVISION at both Peergrade and turnitin Friday by the end of class. You are to revise the essay without using your book or any other resource. Learn to more clearly define and execute the key strategies for writing a 9 essay. Play by the stated rules.

 

 

Tuesday

wislawaszymborska9 

 

 

 

 

Today. Peergrading AP question #3 ICE essays. Here's the prompt, if you've lost yours.

Tonight. Study for The Death of Ivan Ilych 1-3 Vocabulary Quiz.

Ongoing. Friday, November 10. Revised AP question #3 ICE in class. Upload to Crime and Punishment AP question #3 ICE REVISION at both Peergrade and turnitin Friday by the end of class. You are to revise the essay without using your book or any other resource. Learn to more clearly define and execute the key strategies for writing a 9 essay. Play by the stated rules.

 

 

Wednesday

charlessimic8 

 

 

 

 

Today. Vocab. Quiz, The Death of Ivan Ilych 1-3.

Tonight. Peergrade, Crime and Punishment AP questions #3 ICE due by 22:00. If you have time, review the 8-, 7-, and 6-scoring essays from the Othello sample set.

Ongoing. Friday, November 10. Revised AP question #3 ICE in class. Upload to Crime and Punishment AP question #3 ICE REVISION at both Peergrade and turnitin Friday by the end of class. You are to revise the essay without using your book or any other resource. Learn to more clearly define and execute the key strategies for writing a 9 essay. Play by the stated rules.

 

 

Thursday

augustwilson8 

 

 

 

 

Today. Review sample AP question #3 ICE essays.

Tonight.

Ongoing. Friday, November 10. Revised AP question #3 ICE in class. Upload to Crime and Punishment AP question #3 ICE REVISION at both Peergrade and turnitin Friday by the end of class. You are to revise the essay without using your book or any other resource. Learn to more clearly define and execute the key strategies for writing a 9 essay. Play by the stated rules.

 

Friday

cormacmccarthy8 

 

 

 

 

Today. Revise AP question #3 ICE in class. Upload to Crime and Punishment AP question #3 ICE REVISION at both Peergrade and turnitin Friday by the end of class. You are to revise the essay without using your book or any other resource. Learn to more clearly define and execute the key strategies for writing a 9 essay. Play by the stated rules.

Tonight. For Monday, read this document about style. Add key terms to your growing literary vocabulary.
     Read The Death of Ivan Ilych Introduction, pages iii-vii and the novel chapter 1 ¶ 1. That's it. One ¶. Identify the aspects of Tolstoy's style. Also, dredge your memory for the basic elements of fiction and remember how stories begin—with exposition. Define the exposition happening in chapter 1 ¶ 1. What does the story seem to care about? What thematic subjects does the ¶ introduce? What is the narrative point of view? (Learn about point of view here.) What impressions do you have about the narrator? How will he tell his story? What does he care about? What does he know? What are his attitudes toward his characters, their mores, their attitudes and actions?

Sunday, November 12. Peergrade, Crime and Punishment AP Question 3 ICE REVISION by 22:00. A participation grade.

Ongoing.

Assignments due
read them in full

stephenkingworking7

 

Wednesday, November 8. Vocab. Quiz, The Death of Ivan Ilych 1-3.

Wednesday, November 8. Peergrade, Crime and Punishment AP question #3 ICE due by 22:00. Process of essay/peergrading a participation grade.

Friday, November 10. Revised AP question #3 ICE in class. Upload to Crime and Punishment AP question #3 ICE REVISION at both Peergrade and turnitin Friday by the end of class. You are to revise the essay without using your book or any other resource. Learn to more clearly define and execute the key strategies for writing a 9 essay. Play by the stated rules.

Sunday, November 12. Peergrade, Crime and Punishment AP Question 3 ICE REVISION by 22:00. A participation grade.

 

The Death of Ivan Ilych
vocabulary lists

The Death of Ivan Ilych 1-3
The Death of Ivan Ilych 4-12
zipgrade ids

 

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight
LBH sentence crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center
AP sample essays, Othello
Key AP prose analysis documents

 

 

Tolstoy and Dostoevsky

tolstoydostoevsky1

Andrew Kaufman, author of Understanding Tolstoy and Lecturer in Slavic Languages and Literature, University of Virginia.

"All mediocre novelists are alike; every great novelist is great in his own way. Which is why the choice between nineteenth-century Russia's two supreme prose writers ultimately boils down to the question of which kind of greatness resonates with a particular reader. My own sympathies are with Tolstoy, and even my criteria for judging a work of fiction, I admit, are relentlessly Tolstoyan.
     "'The goal of the artist,' Tolstoy wrote, 'is not to solve a question irrefutably, but to force people to love life in all its countless, inexhaustible manifestations.' By this standard Tolstoy's novels succeed where Dostoevsky's fall short.
     "True, Dostoevsky saw and felt modern experience in all of its isolating, tragic depth. He showed the obsessive power of ideas and the psychological crises, cracks, and explosions of the soul that have become familiar in our modern world. What he doesn't do, however, is make you love life in all its manifestations. In fact, when he tries to do so, he reveals his deficiencies.
     "At the end of Crime and Punishment Raskolnikov flings himself at the feet of Sonya, who has followed him to Siberia where he is serving his sentence for double homicide. Sonya jumps up, looks at him and trembles. 'Infinite happiness lit up in her eyes; she understood, and for her there was no longer any doubt that he loved her, loved her infinitely, and that at last the moment had come'— If this smacks of modern soap opera or those maudlin French novels Dostoevsky was raised on, that's because it is melodrama. Sonya's infinite love is an ideal, the moment that has supposedly come, an abstraction.
     "What modern readers need, Tolstoy believed, is not more lurching after 'infinite happiness or the Great Idea,' as Stepan Trofimovich, near the end of The Demons, claims to have discovered, but the ability to embrace an imperfect reality. The author of Anna Karenina teaches us how to seek meaning not through grandiose romantic strivings, like Anna and Vronsky, but within the limits of imperfect social and family structures, like Kitty and Levin.
     "Tolstoy's novels depict the norms and continuities of human behavior by means of grand narratives that expand slowly over time and against the backdrop of vast natural tableaus. 'As is usually the case' and 'such as often occurs' are phrases you encounter frequently in Tolstoy. Dostoevsky's world, by contrast, is one in which you can come home one evening and 'suddenly' find an axe buried in your skull. Life is always on the verge of imploding on itself. Tragedy is just around the corner, or in your living room.
     "Tolstoy's living room is a place where people, well, live. It's where dark-eyed, voluble twelve-year old Natasha Rostova comes running with doll in hand, or where, a decade later, she enjoys with Pierre one of those endearingly mundane conversations between wife and husband about nothing and everything.
     "'I am a realist in a higher sense,' Dostoevsky rightfully claimed. But Tolstoy was a realist in the total sense. 'The hero of my tale is Truth,' he wrote. And that truth is one every generation recognizes as its own, not just those in a state of social crisis or existential despair. If Dostoevsky urges us to reach for the heavens, then Tolstoy teaches us by artistic example how we may touch the transcendent here and now in our messy, fleeting world."

The Death of Ivan Ilych
reading links

ivanilychpevearcover5

Satire by David Mikics
Parody, Satire by Edward Hirsch
Realism by David Mikics
Study questions
Tolstoy, searching for meaning in life
Tolstoy, greatest writer ever?
Five curious facts about Tolstoy
See Yasnaya Polyana, Tostoy's estate

 

 

An Introduction to Tolstoy

 

 

Nabokov on Tolstoy's style

AMAGNUMIG8 

 

 

 

"You may have seen, you must have seen, some of those awful text books written not by educators but by educationalists Ñ by people who talk about books instead of talking within books. You may have been told by them that the chief aim of a great writer, and indeed the main clue to his greatness, is "simplicity." Traitors, not teachers. In reading exam papers written by misled students, of both sexes, about this or that author, I have often come across such phrases—probably recollections from more tenderyears of schooling—as "his style is simple" or "his style is clear and simple" or "his style is beautiful and simple" or "his style is quite beautiful and simple." But rememberthat "simplicity" is buncombe. No major writer is simple. The Saturday Evening Post is simple. Journalese is simple. Upton Lewis is simple. Mom is simple. Digests are simple. Damnation is simple. But Tolstoys and Melvilles are not simple.
     "One peculiar feature of Tolstoy's style is what I shall term the "groping purist." In describing a meditation, emotion, or tangible object, Tolstoy follows the contours of the thought, the emotion, or the object until he is perfectly satisfied with his re-creation, his rendering. This involves what we might call creative repetitions, a compact series of repetitive statements, coming one immediately after the other, each more expressive, each closer to Tolstoy's meaning. He gropes, he unwraps the verbal parcel for its inner sense, he peels the apple of the phrase, he tries to say it one way, then a better way, he gropes, he stalls, he toys, he Tolstoys with words.
     "Another feature of his style is his manner of weaving striking details into the story, the freshness of the descriptions of physical states. Nobody in the eighties in Russia wrote like that. The story was a forerunner of Russian modernism just before the dull and conventional Soviet era. If there is the fable noted, there is too a tender, poetical intonation here and there, and there is the tense mental monologue, the stream of consciousness technique that he had already invented for the description of Anna's last journey."

 

 

The changing nature of satire
(watch the video here)

"Donald Trump's presidency is ushering in a new era in American politics, and with it a new era in political satire: the age of post-truth. With Trump railing against the press on a seemingly daily basis (and tweeting his own facts), satire is poised to play an important role during his presidency, but what will post-truth satire look like in Trump's America?
"Though it is relatively young, satirizing presidential politics has undergone a radical shift in its roughly fifty-year history. Many of the earliest presidential satirists sought to illuminate the absurd within the real. Through the latter half of the 20th century, presidential satirists mainly worked to amplify their targets, making them more extreme, more out of touch, more absurd. The truth these satirists sought was not found in the real, but in the absurd amplification of the real.
     "Chevy Chase's Gerald Ford on Christmas Eve is a prime example. In the sketch, Ford's clumsiness and general buffoonery are amplified—he starts his fireside address early, cuts ornaments off the tree, hangs stockings upside down, and of course, falls over trying to put the star on the tree. Similarly, Phil Hartman's Bill Clinton voraciously eats all the McDonald's he can get his hands on. His one-on-one charm and policy knowledge are on full display, as is his uncontrollable appetite (and not just for food). Both of these examples push absurdity in order to reveal truths about the two men.
     "After 9/11 and during George W. Bush's presidency satire began to shift. The truth became harder to find, thanks in part to the secrecy of the Bush White House and the patriotically correct— reporting of the media, who seemed tentative to question lest they be seen as unpatriotic. Cable news went all in, often sensationalizing the news rather than reporting it. The Daily Show and The Colbert Report stepped into this truth vacuum."
     

October 30-November 3

Monday

juanfelipeherrera7 

 

 

 

 

Today. Crime and Punishment essay due. AP Open-ended questions, practice with Crime and Punishment. Some sample AP open-ended essays.

Have the exact copy of The Death of Ivan Ilych ready to go after Crime and Punishment. See right column for details. You will need the book next week.

Tonight. Begin preparing for Friday's in-class AP Open-ended essay using Crime and Punishment.

Ongoing.

 

 

Tuesday

wislawaszymborska8 

 

 

 

 

Today. Continued practice AP Open-ended questions. More samples, more essay-making practice.

Tonight. Read these sample essays. Use this revision/feedback bookmark to guide your analysis. Pay special attention to the RTP and to the associations in the essays.

Ongoing. Continue preparing for Friday's in-class AP Open-ended essay using Crime and Punishment.

 

 

Wednesday

charlessimic7 

 

 

 

 

Today. Continued practice AP Open-ended questions. More samples, more essay-making practice.

Tonight. Continue preparing for Friday's in-class AP Open-ended essay using Crime and Punishment.

Ongoing.

 

 

Thursday

augustwilson7 

 

 

 

 

Today. Continued practice AP Open-ended questions. More samples, more essay-making practice.

Tonight. Continue preparing for Friday's in-class AP Open-ended essay using Crime and Punishment.

Ongoing.

 

Friday

cormacmccarthy7 

 

 

 

 

Today. Continued practice AP Open-ended questions. More samples, more essay-making practice. Oh, yea.

In-class AP question 3 essay on Monday.

Tonight.

Ongoing.

Assignments due
read them in full

stephenkingworking6

 

Monday, October 30. Crime and Punishment essay. See details below. Include the information and follow the directions on this template or lose five points.

Monday, November 6. In-class AP Open-ended essay. You will use Crime and Punishment.

Saturday, November 4 by 22:00. Peergrade, Crime and Punishment essay. A participation grade.

Wednesday, November 8. Vocab. Quiz, The Death of Ivan Ilych 1-3.

 

 

The Death of Ivan Ilych
vocabulary lists

The Death of Ivan Ilych 1-3
The Death of Ivan Ilych 4-12

 

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight
LBH sentence crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center
Key AP prose analysis documents

 

 

Tolstoy and Dostoevsky

tolstoydostoevsky

Andrew Kaufman, author of Understanding Tolstoy and Lecturer in Slavic Languages and Literature, University of Virginia.

"All mediocre novelists are alike; every great novelist is great in his own way. Which is why the choice between nineteenth-century Russia's two supreme prose writers ultimately boils down to the question of which kind of greatness resonates with a particular reader. My own sympathies are with Tolstoy, and even my criteria for judging a work of fiction, I admit, are relentlessly Tolstoyan.
     "'The goal of the artist,' Tolstoy wrote, 'is not to solve a question irrefutably, but to force people to love life in all its countless, inexhaustible manifestations.' By this standard Tolstoy's novels succeed where Dostoevsky's fall short.
     "True, Dostoevsky saw and felt modern experience in all of its isolating, tragic depth. He showed the obsessive power of ideas and the psychological crises, cracks, and explosions of the soul that have become familiar in our modern world. What he doesn't do, however, is make you love life in all its manifestations. In fact, when he tries to do so, he reveals his deficiencies.
     "At the end of Crime and Punishment Raskolnikov flings himself at the feet of Sonya, who has followed him to Siberia where he is serving his sentence for double homicide. Sonya jumps up, looks at him and trembles. 'Infinite happiness lit up in her eyes; she understood, and for her there was no longer any doubt that he loved her, loved her infinitely, and that at last the moment had come'— If this smacks of modern soap opera or those maudlin French novels Dostoevsky was raised on, that's because it is melodrama. Sonya's infinite love is an ideal, the moment that has supposedly come, an abstraction.
     "What modern readers need, Tolstoy believed, is not more lurching after 'infinite happiness or the Great Idea,' as Stepan Trofimovich, near the end of The Demons, claims to have discovered, but the ability to embrace an imperfect reality. The author of Anna Karenina teaches us how to seek meaning not through grandiose romantic strivings, like Anna and Vronsky, but within the limits of imperfect social and family structures, like Kitty and Levin.
     "Tolstoy's novels depict the norms and continuities of human behavior by means of grand narratives that expand slowly over time and against the backdrop of vast natural tableaus. 'As is usually the case' and 'such as often occurs' are phrases you encounter frequently in Tolstoy. Dostoevsky's world, by contrast, is one in which you can come home one evening and 'suddenly' find an axe buried in your skull. Life is always on the verge of imploding on itself. Tragedy is just around the corner, or in your living room.
     "Tolstoy's living room is a place where people, well, live. It's where dark-eyed, voluble twelve-year old Natasha Rostova comes running with doll in hand, or where, a decade later, she enjoys with Pierre one of those endearingly mundane conversations between wife and husband about nothing and everything.
     "'I am a realist in a higher sense,' Dostoevsky rightfully claimed. But Tolstoy was a realist in the total sense. 'The hero of my tale is Truth,' he wrote. And that truth is one every generation recognizes as its own, not just those in a state of social crisis or existential despair. If Dostoevsky urges us to reach for the heavens, then Tolstoy teaches us by artistic example how we may touch the transcendent here and now in our messy, fleeting world."

The Death of Ivan Ilych
reading links

ivanilychpevearcover4

Satire by David Mikics
Realism by David Mikics
Study questions
Tolstoy, searching for meaning in life
Tolstoy, greatest writer ever?
Five curious facts about Tolstoy
See Yasnaya Polyana, Tostoy's estate

 

 

An Introduction to Tolstoy

 

 

Nabokov on Tolstoy's style

AMAGNUMIG7 

 

 

 

"You may have seen, you must have seen, some of those awful text books written not by educators but by educationalists Ñ by people who talk about books instead of talking within books. You may have been told by them that the chief aim of a great writer, and indeed the main clue to his greatness, is "simplicity." Traitors, not teachers. In reading exam papers written by misled students, of both sexes, about this or that author, I have often come across such phrases—probably recollections from more tenderyears of schooling—as "his style is simple" or "his style is clear and simple" or "his style is beautiful and simple" or "his style is quite beautiful and simple." But rememberthat "simplicity" is buncombe. No major writer is simple. The Saturday Evening Post is simple. Journalese is simple. Upton Lewis is simple. Mom is simple. Digests are simple. Damnation is simple. But Tolstoys and Melvilles are not simple.
     "One peculiar feature of Tolstoy's style is what I shall term the "groping purist." In describing a meditation, emotion, or tangible object, Tolstoy follows the contours of the thought, the emotion, or the object until he is perfectly satisfied with his re-creation, his rendering. This involves what we might call creative repetitions, a compact series of repetitive statements, coming one immediately after the other, each more expressive, each closer to Tolstoy's meaning. He gropes, he unwraps the verbal parcel for its inner sense, he peels the apple of the phrase, he tries to say it one way, then a better way, he gropes, he stalls, he toys, he Tolstoys with words.
     "Another feature of his style is his manner of weaving striking details into the story, the freshness of the descriptions of physical states. Nobody in the eighties in Russia wrote like that. The story was a forerunner of Russian modernism just before the dull and conventional Soviet era. If there is the fable noted, there is too a tender, poetical intonation here and there, and there is the tense mental monologue, the stream of consciousness technique that he had already invented for the description of Anna's last journey."
     

October 23-27

Monday

juanfelipeherrera6 

 

 

 

 

Today. Closing ¶s, Degen and Trimble. About the Crime and Punishment essay.

Have the exact copy of The Death of Ivan Ilych ready to go after Crime and Punishment. See right column for details.

Tonight. Write an interesting question about Part 6 Chapters 1 & 2 and find two rich passages that respond to your question. I want to see those passages annotated in your book.

Ongoing. Be working on your Crime and Punishment essay, due Monday, October 30. The essay is your chance to gauge your progress.

 

 

Tuesday

wislawaszymborska7 

 

 

 

 

Today. We will discuss Crime and Punishment Part 6 Chapters 1 & 2.

Tonight. Write an interesting question about Part 6 Chapters 3 & 4 and find two rich passages that respond to your question. I want to see those passages annotated in your book.

Ongoing. Be working on your Crime and Punishment essay, due Monday, October 30. The essay is your chance to gauge your progress.

 

 

Wednesday

charlessimic6 

 

 

 

 

Today. We will discuss Crime and Punishment Part 6 Chapters 3 & 4.

Tonight. Write an interesting question about Part 6 Chapters 5 & 6 and find two rich passages that respond to your question. I want to see those passages annotated in your book.

Ongoing. Be working on your Crime and Punishment essay, due Monday, October 30. The essay is your chance to gauge your progress.

Crime and Punishment essay due Monday, October 30.

 

 

Thursday

augustwilson6 

 

 

 

 

Today. We will discuss Crime and Punishment Part 6 Chapters 5 & 6.

Tonight. Write an interesting question about Part 6 Chapters 7 & 8 and Epilogue and find two rich passages that respond to your question. I want to see those passages annotated in your book.

Ongoing. Be working on your Crime and Punishment essay, due Monday, October 30. The essay is your chance to gauge your progress.

 

Friday

cormacmccarthy6 

 

 

 

 

Today. We will discuss Crime and Punishment Part 6 Chapters 7 & 8 and Epilogue.

Tonight. Enjoy something non-academic. For Monday, bring Trimble, Writing with Style, Crime and Punishment, and Degen.

Ongoing. Be working on your Crime and Punishment essay, due Monday, October 30. The essay is your chance to gauge your progress.

Crime and Punishment essay due Monday, October 30. See details in middle column. Include the information and follow the directions on this template or lose five points.

Crime and Punishment
reading links

crimeandpunishmentcoverreadinglinks5

 

Character list
Chronology of Part 1 and map of Petersburg
Sample annotated opening pages
What C & P can teach you that the internet can't
Archbishop Rowan Williams on Dostoevsky
Raskolnikov's St. Petersburg, map of his travels

Articles on Crime and Punishment
Dostoevsky's empathy
Is reason always wrong? Kant's Categorical Imperative
Kant and Hume on morality
Reverence by Paul Woodruff
Paul Woodruff talks to Bill Moyers
A few words about plot by Justin Cronin
Crime and Punishment, a simple summary
List of passages to do with Raskolnikov's progress

 

 

Buy this exact book
click cover for details

ivanilychpevearcover3

 

 

Dostoevsky's characterization
Vladimir Nabokov

AMAGNUMIG6“Dostoyevsky characterizes his people through situation, through ethical matters, their psychological reactions, their inside ripples. After describing the looks of a character, he uses the old-fashioned device of not referring to his specific physical appearance anymore in the scenes with him. This is not the way of an artist—say Tolstoy—who sees his character in his mind all the time and knows exactly the specific gesture he will employ at this or that moment. But there is something more striking still about Dostoyevsky.”

 

 

Empthy versus sympathy

repinbargehaulersonthevolga5

"In 1909, the psychologist Edward Titchener translated the German Einfhlung ('feeling into') into English as empathy. Empathy can be defined as a person's ability to recognize and share the emotions of another person, fictional character, or sentient being. It involves, first, seeing someone else's situation from his perspective, and, second, sharing his emotions, including, if any, his distress.
     "For me to share in someone else's perspective, I must do more than merely put myself into his position. Instead, I must imagine myself as him, and, more than that, imagine myself as him in the particular situation in which he finds himself. I cannot empathize with an abstract or detached feeling. To empathize with a particular person, I need to have at least some knowledge of who he is and what he is doing or trying to do. As John Steinbeck wrote, 'It means very little to know that a million Chinese are starving unless you know one Chinese who is starving.'
     "Empathy is often confused with pity, sympathy, and compassion, which are each reactions to the plight of others. Pity is a feeling of discomfort at the distress of one or more sentient beings, and often has paternalistic or condescending overtones. Implicit in the notion of pity is that its object does not deserve its plight, and, moreover, is unable to prevent, reverse, or overturn it. Pity is less engaged than empathy, sympathy, or compassion, amounting to little more than a conscious acknowledgement of the plight of its object."

Assignments due
read them in full

stephenkingworking5

 

Monday, October 23. Crime and Punishment Part 6 & Epilogue. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Monday, October 30. Crime and Punishment essay. See details below. Include the information and follow the directions on this template or lose five points.

 

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight
LBH sentence crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center

 

 

Crime and Punishment essay

dostoevskyforcpessay8One of the most frequent and telling patterns in literature is repetition. Repetition clues us into what the author wants us to notice, what he or she thinks matters. As you continue to read Crime and Punishment, note some repeated element. You might see a word (one associated with a character, say), an image, a character's repeated action or thought, a setting, an allusion, a theme. See the list on page 94 in Degen. But be creative here. You might, for instance, choose something off the beaten track, comparing how Dostoevsky describes his characters, for instance, or the hidden clues in clothing. Don't think you need to slavishly follow my suggestions or Degen's list. Be open to growth, my friends. His questions for each category, are fine, but don't be limited to them. He lists some questions for each category, but don't be limited to them. Follow your own thinking and interests. Let your interest drive your thinking and writing. Remember the questions I asked you to write last week? Read this about asking good questions. And remember that literature shows you human truth.

You will devise your own topic by choosing one repeated element you find interesting, and over time discovering an interesting and insightful way of thinking about the repeated element. You will then define a way of organizing the essay, perhaps from those found in option two on pages 95-103 in Degen.

As you read the novel, record telling evidence about your repeated element, and do so in some organized way—front/back of your book; on paper; a doc; or using post-it notes or colored tabs. Notice what the novel's showing you about your element, what questions it prompts you to ask, what answers it offers. On each note record the questions you ask or the relevance you see to your category and cross reference examples as you go. The more you read, the more you should begin to find interesting questions and to enrich and clarify your thinking.

Read and think thematically. Here's a good introduction to theme. You will eventually link your repeated element to theme.

The patterns you discover and the questions you ask will lead you to an interesting thesis.

We'll finalize your topic and thesis later, in conference.

For this and all writing assignments, do no Googling or other research. Reading other people's ideas gets in the way of your own and often sends them packing. Who knows what you would have thought? Develop your own thinking and writing, your own ability to create a point of view. That matters more than you know. Use nothing other than your book, your class notes, and your own mind.

October 16-20

Monday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Peergrading Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT in class.

Have the exact copy of The Death of Ivan Ilych ready to go after Crime and Punishment. See right column for details.

Tonight. Find two rich passages in Part 5 Chapters 1 & 2 satirizing the progressivist viewpoint. I want to see them annotated in your book.

Work on peergrade, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT 2 DRAFT, due tonight by 22:00. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 6 & Epilogue. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

 

 

Tuesday

wislawaszymborska6 

 

 

 

 

Today. Bring Crime and Punishment and Degen. We will discuss Part 5 Chapters 1 & 2.

Tonight. Study for vocab. quiz, Crime and Punishment Part 4.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 6 & Epilogue. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Crime and Punishment essay due Monday, October 30.

 

 

Wednesday

charlessimic5 

 

 

 

 

Today. Vocab. Quiz Crime and Punishment Part 4.

Tonight. Find at least two passages in Part 5 Chapter 3 defining the wrongs in Luzhin's crime. Know what they show you about that crime. I want to see the passages annotated in your book. Contrast Luzhin's crime with Raskolnikov's and Sonya's.

Work on peergrade edit, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT 2 FINAL. I expect your comments to be specific, concrete, and rich. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 6 & Epilogue. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Crime and Punishment essay due Monday, October 30.

 

 

Thursday

augustwilson5 

 

 

 

 

Today. Bring Crime and Punishment and Degen. We will discuss Crime and Punishment Part 5, Chapters 3 & 4.

Tonight. Find at least two rich passages in Part 5 Chapters 4 & 5 defining RAskolnikov's growth. I want to see those passages annotated in your book.

Work on peergrade edit, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT 2 FINAL. I expect your comments to be specific, concrete, and rich. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 6 & Epilogue. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Crime and Punishment essay due Monday, October 30.

 

Friday

cormacmccarthy5 

 

 

 

 

Today. Bring Crime and Punishment and Degen. We will discuss Part 5, Chapters 4 & 5.

Tonight. Enjoy something non-academic. For Monday, bring Trimble, Writing with Style, Crime and Punishment, and Degen.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 6 & Epilogue, due Monday, October 23. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book. I'll be checking them for a quiz.

Peergrade, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT 2 FINAL, due Saturday by 15:30 A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Crime and Punishment essay due Monday, October 30.

Crime and Punishment
reading links

crimeandpunishmentcoverreadinglinks4

 

Character list
Chronology of Part 1 and map of Petersburg
Sample annotated opening pages
What C & P can teach you that the internet can't
Archbishop Rowan Williams on Dostoevsky
Raskolnikov's St. Petersburg, map of his travels

Articles on Crime and Punishment
Dostoevsky's empathy
Is reason always wrong? Kant's Categorical Imperative
Kant and Hume on morality
Reverence by Paul Woodruff
Paul Woodruff talks to Bill Moyers
A few words about plot by Justin Cronin
Crime and Punishment, a simple summary
List of passages to do with Raskolnikov's progress

 

 

Buy this exact book
click cover for details

ivanilychpevearcover2

 

 

Dostoevsky's characterization
Vladimir Nabokov

AMAGNUMIG5“Dostoyevsky characterizes his people through situation, through ethical matters, their psychological reactions, their inside ripples. After describing the looks of a character, he uses the old-fashioned device of not referring to his specific physical appearance anymore in the scenes with him. This is not the way of an artist—say Tolstoy—who sees his character in his mind all the time and knows exactly the specific gesture he will employ at this or that moment. But there is something more striking still about Dostoyevsky.”

 

 

On Dostoevsky
Charles Block

byheartdostoevsky5"So 10th grade, Crime and Punishment. After school, I started reading along with the class for the first time.
     "It got even weirder, because the pawnbroker Raskolnikov murders is a gruff woman. She reminded me a little of my mother. I think of my mom as a very kind person, but she never wanted to be a pawnbroker. She used to say, Don't tell people what we do. She always said, Tell people your parents are in sales. She didn't want people to judge us, I guess. In any case, she wasn't really suited for it. She was a nervous person who could get upset easily, and she didn't enjoy being down there. She could really not be easy with the customers.
     "So as Dostoyevsky presented this woman, who acts gruffly towards Raskolnikov and treats him with suspicion, it was not too hard to see the parallels—and that made me feel kind of sick. It was so much like what I knew. And in that familiar setting, the worst nightmare takes place. The murder is so clearly and so cleanly described.
     Dostoyevsky is fairly bloodless about this. There's no melodrama—it's very plain description. One thing that was strange to me, back then, was that we actually care about Raskolnikov. We want him to get away with murder. I could tell, even then, that the whole point of the book is that you want him to get away this, that you're rooting for him.
     "But how was I supposed to do that?
     "Other sections of the book also got to me—especially the fact that, after killing and robbing the woman, Raskolnikov returns home and goes to sleep. That, I understood: It's what I do all the time. When I was fifteen and had my learner's permit, I drove my dad's car into a wall. Afterwards, I went home and got in bed and tried to hide. It's what I still do, even now, after any failure or bad thing—when my teeth hurt, or I'm trying to figure something out, or I'm at an impasse in my work, one of the things I do is take a nap. I consider myself one of the world's great nappers. I'll set my alarm for ten minutes, and I'm not sure if I fall asleep or not, but I sit there thinking and relax.
     "To see that someone knew the human condition this deeply. I remember thinking, how does Dostoyevsky know I do this? It had a profound effect on me. The writer of this book had somehow created intimate connections between my life in Las Vegas and 19th-century Russia. I understood, for the first time, that there is a deeper truth going on in fiction. I don't think it changed my everyday malaise, or my lostness. That wasn't going to change for a long time. But, I do think some larger doors started to open—in my understanding of what people can know, of what literature might be."

 

 

Empthy versus sympathy

repinbargehaulersonthevolga4

"In 1909, the psychologist Edward Titchener translated the German Einfhlung ('feeling into') into English as empathy. Empathy can be defined as a person's ability to recognize and share the emotions of another person, fictional character, or sentient being. It involves, first, seeing someone else's situation from his perspective, and, second, sharing his emotions, including, if any, his distress.
     "For me to share in someone else's perspective, I must do more than merely put myself into his position. Instead, I must imagine myself as him, and, more than that, imagine myself as him in the particular situation in which he finds himself. I cannot empathize with an abstract or detached feeling. To empathize with a particular person, I need to have at least some knowledge of who he is and what he is doing or trying to do. As John Steinbeck wrote, 'It means very little to know that a million Chinese are starving unless you know one Chinese who is starving.'
     "Empathy is often confused with pity, sympathy, and compassion, which are each reactions to the plight of others. Pity is a feeling of discomfort at the distress of one or more sentient beings, and often has paternalistic or condescending overtones. Implicit in the notion of pity is that its object does not deserve its plight, and, moreover, is unable to prevent, reverse, or overturn it. Pity is less engaged than empathy, sympathy, or compassion, amounting to little more than a conscious acknowledgement of the plight of its object."

Assignments due
read them in full

stephenkingworking4

 

Monday, October 16 in class. Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT 2 DRAFT.

Monday, October 16. Peergrade, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT 2 DRAFT due by 22:00.

Wednesday, October 18. Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT 2. Paper copy in class, upload to assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT 2 at both peergrade and turnitin by 15:30.

Wednesday, October 18. Vocab. quiz, Crime and Punishment Part 4.

Saturday, October 21. Peergrade, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT 2 by 15:30. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Monday, October 23. Crime and Punishment Part 6 & Epilogue. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Monday, October 30. Crime and Punishment essay. See details below.

 

 

Crime and Punishment vocab lists

Crime and Punishment Part 1 list
Crime and Punishment Part 2 list
Crime and Punishment Part 3 list
Crime and Punishment Part 4 list
Crime and Punishment Part 5 list
Crime and Punishment Part 6, Epilogue list
zipgrade student ids

 

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight
LBH sentence crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center

 

 

Crime and Punishment essay

dostoevskyforcpessay7One of the most frequent and telling patterns in literature is repetition. Repetition clues us into what the author wants us to notice, what he or she thinks matters. As you continue to read Crime and Punishment, note some repeated element. You might see a word (one associated with a character, say), an image, a character's repeated action or thought, a setting, an allusion, a theme. See the list on page 94 in Degen. But be creative here. You might, for instance, choose something off the beaten track, comparing how Dostoevsky describes his characters, for instance, or the hidden clues in clothing. Don't think you need to slavishly follow my suggestions or Degen's list. Be open to growth, my friends. His questions for each category, are fine, but don't be limited to them. He lists some questions for each category, but don't be limited to them. Follow your own thinking and interests. Let your interest drive your thinking and writing. Remember the questions I asked you to write last week? Read this about asking good questions. And remember that literature shows you human truth.

You will devise your own topic by choosing one repeated element you find interesting, and over time discovering an interesting and insightful way of thinking about the repeated element. You will then define a way of organizing the essay, perhaps from those found in option two on pages 95-103 in Degen.

As you read the novel, record telling evidence about your repeated element, and do so in some organized way—front/back of your book; on paper; a doc; or using post-it notes or colored tabs. Notice what the novel's showing you about your element, what questions it prompts you to ask, what answers it offers. On each note record the questions you ask or the relevance you see to your category and cross reference examples as you go. The more you read, the more you should begin to find interesting questions and to enrich and clarify your thinking.

Read and think thematically. Here's a good introduction to theme. You will eventually link your repeated element to theme.

The patterns you discover and the questions you ask will lead you to an interesting thesis.

We'll finalize your topic and thesis later, in conference.

For this and all writing assignments, do no Googling or other research. Reading other people's ideas gets in the way of your own and often sends them packing. Who knows what you would have thought? Develop your own thinking and writing, your own ability to create a point of view. That matters more than you know. Use nothing other than your book, your class notes, and your own mind.

 

 

Russian modernist film
Man with a movie camera
Dziga Vertov

 

 

Russian stop-motion animation
Hedgehog in the fog
Yuri Norstein

October 9-13

Monday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Bring Crime and Punishment and Degen. Our continued discussion of Crime and Punishment Parts 2, 3, & 4. We'll continue following the moments of Raskolnikov's confrontation with his demons to understand his moral transformation. Have your list of annotated passaged ready.

See list of passages to do with Raskolnikov's progress under Crime and Punishment reading links.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT due. Paper in class, upload to assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION at both turnitin and peergrade by 15:30. Remove your name from peergrade copy if you like. See Essay submission on the policy page for details.

Have the exact copy of The Death of Ivan Ilych reading to go after Crime and Punishment. See right column for details.

Tonight. Work on peergrade, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT, due Friday by 15:30. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 5. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Peergrade, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT due by 15:30 Friday. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT 2 due Monday. Assignment details posted in middle column.

 

 

Tuesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Bring Crime and Punishment and Degen. Our continued discussion of Crime and Punishment Parts 2, 3, & 4. We'll continue following the moments of Raskolnikov's confrontation with his demons to understand his moral transformation. Have your list of annotated passaged ready.

Tonight. Work on peergrade, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT, due Friday by 15:30. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 5. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Peergrade, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT due by 15:30 Friday. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT 2 due Monday. Assignment details posted in middle column.

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. No classes. Testing, Career Day.

Tonight. Work on peergrade edit, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT. I expect your comments to be specific, concrete, and rich. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 5. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Peergrade, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT due by 15:30 Friday. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT 2 due Monday. Assignment details posted in middle column.

Crime and Punishment essay due Monday, October 30.

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Bring Crime and Punishment and Degen. Our continued discussion of Crime and Punishment Parts 2, 3, & 4. We'll continue following the moments of Raskolnikov's confrontation with his demons to understand his moral transformation. Have your list of annotated passaged ready.

Tonight. Work on peergrade edit, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT. I expect your comments to be specific, concrete, and rich. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 5. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Peergrade, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT due by 15:30 Friday. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT 2 due Monday. Assignment details posted in middle column.

Crime and Punishment essay due Monday, October 30.

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Bring Crime and Punishment and Degen. Our continued discussion of Crime and Punishment Parts 2, 3, & 4. We'll continue following the moments of Raskolnikov's confrontation with his demons to understand his moral transformation.

Peergrade, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT due by 15:30. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Tonight. Enjoy something non-academic.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 5, due Monday, October 16. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book. I'll be checking them for a quiz.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT 2 DRAFT due Monday. Assignment details posted in middle column. Read the assignment, in full.

Crime and Punishment essay due Monday, October 30.

Crime and Punishment
reading links

 

Character list
Chronology of Part 1 and map of Petersburg
Sample annotated opening pages
What C & P can teach you that the internet can't
Archbishop Rowan Williams on Dostoevsky
Raskolnikov's St. Petersburg, map of his travels

Articles on Crime and Punishment
Dostoevsky's empathy
Is reason always wrong? Kant's Categorical Imperative
Kant and Hume on morality
Reverence by Paul Woodruff
Paul Woodruff talks to Bill Moyers
A few words about plot by Justin Cronin
Crime and Punishment, a simple summary
List of passages to do with Raskolnikov's progress

 

 

Buy this exact book
click cover for details

 

 

Dostoevsky's characterization
Vladimir Nabokov

“Dostoyevsky characterizes his people through situation, through ethical matters, their psychological reactions, their inside ripples. After describing the looks of a character, he uses the old-fashioned device of not referring to his specific physical appearance anymore in the scenes with him. This is not the way of an artist—say Tolstoy—who sees his character in his mind all the time and knows exactly the specific gesture he will employ at this or that moment. But there is something more striking still about Dostoyevsky.”

 

 

On Dostoevsky
Charles Block

"So 10th grade, Crime and Punishment. After school, I started reading along with the class for the first time.
     "It got even weirder, because the pawnbroker Raskolnikov murders is a gruff woman. She reminded me a little of my mother. I think of my mom as a very kind person, but she never wanted to be a pawnbroker. She used to say, Don't tell people what we do. She always said, Tell people your parents are in sales. She didn't want people to judge us, I guess. In any case, she wasn't really suited for it. She was a nervous person who could get upset easily, and she didn't enjoy being down there. She could really not be easy with the customers.
     "So as Dostoyevsky presented this woman, who acts gruffly towards Raskolnikov and treats him with suspicion, it was not too hard to see the parallels—and that made me feel kind of sick. It was so much like what I knew. And in that familiar setting, the worst nightmare takes place. The murder is so clearly and so cleanly described.
     Dostoyevsky is fairly bloodless about this. There's no melodrama—it's very plain description. One thing that was strange to me, back then, was that we actually care about Raskolnikov. We want him to get away with murder. I could tell, even then, that the whole point of the book is that you want him to get away this, that you're rooting for him.
     "But how was I supposed to do that?
     "Other sections of the book also got to me—especially the fact that, after killing and robbing the woman, Raskolnikov returns home and goes to sleep. That, I understood: It's what I do all the time. When I was fifteen and had my learner's permit, I drove my dad's car into a wall. Afterwards, I went home and got in bed and tried to hide. It's what I still do, even now, after any failure or bad thing—when my teeth hurt, or I'm trying to figure something out, or I'm at an impasse in my work, one of the things I do is take a nap. I consider myself one of the world's great nappers. I'll set my alarm for ten minutes, and I'm not sure if I fall asleep or not, but I sit there thinking and relax.
     "To see that someone knew the human condition this deeply. I remember thinking, how does Dostoyevsky know I do this? It had a profound effect on me. The writer of this book had somehow created intimate connections between my life in Las Vegas and 19th-century Russia. I understood, for the first time, that there is a deeper truth going on in fiction. I don't think it changed my everyday malaise, or my lostness. That wasn't going to change for a long time. But, I do think some larger doors started to open—in my understanding of what people can know, of what literature might be."

 

 

Empthy versus sympathy

"In 1909, the psychologist Edward Titchener translated the German Einfhlung ('feeling into') into English as empathy. Empathy can be defined as a person's ability to recognize and share the emotions of another person, fictional character, or sentient being. It involves, first, seeing someone else's situation from his perspective, and, second, sharing his emotions, including, if any, his distress.
     "For me to share in someone else's perspective, I must do more than merely put myself into his position. Instead, I must imagine myself as him, and, more than that, imagine myself as him in the particular situation in which he finds himself. I cannot empathize with an abstract or detached feeling. To empathize with a particular person, I need to have at least some knowledge of who he is and what he is doing or trying to do. As John Steinbeck wrote, 'It means very little to know that a million Chinese are starving unless you know one Chinese who is starving.'
     "Empathy is often confused with pity, sympathy, and compassion, which are each reactions to the plight of others. Pity is a feeling of discomfort at the distress of one or more sentient beings, and often has paternalistic or condescending overtones. Implicit in the notion of pity is that its object does not deserve its plight, and, moreover, is unable to prevent, reverse, or overturn it. Pity is less engaged than empathy, sympathy, or compassion, amounting to little more than a conscious acknowledgement of the plight of its object."

 

 

Russian modernist film
Man with a movie camera
Dziga Vertov

 

 

Russian stop-motion animation
Hedgehog in the fog
Yuri Norstein

Assignments due
read them in full

 

Monday, October 9. Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT.

Friday, October 13. Peergrade, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT due by 15:30. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Monday, October 1. Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT 2. DRAFT A new ¶.
     Now that you've learned a bit more about writing body ¶s and written three, keep your practice on your repeated element and the upcoming essay on Crime and Punishment.
     Continue revising and improving TH to write the best you can about how you're currently thinking about your repeataed element (RE). Look at several instances of your RE. Work from the page, noticing the clues Dostoevsky places there. What do you notice? What associations do you make, what thematic idea bubbles through them? What does RE tell you about that theme? Is your RE about love, about the power of noble feelings, about restoring the human community, about the dangers of intellect, the good of emotion? Find the theme and define what RE tells you about that theme. Knowing what RE says about theme will point you to a good TH, and a good TH is a lot. You shouldn't move forward until you're satisfied with your TH. That's step one.
     Step two is to define the topics your TH needs to cover. Ask yourself if developing a few instances of RE will be interesting and compelling. If so, define what each instance shows you about TH. Doing that points you to a series of TS. Be wise when choosing instances to discuss. You want them to reveal aspects of TH or to open up deeper stuff about TH. Once you've done this you have a conceptual outline of the essay.
     Your thinking will develop as you continue to read, that's fine. Work with what you think now. Imagine an essay developing your TH and write at least three TS, the best you can now. Make those TS follow a clear focus reflecting how you're thinking about your TH from the novel. Are you looking at Raskolnikov's moments of rationalizing his justification for the murder? At Luzhin's utilitarian thinking? Whatever you're doing, your RE must be fairly concrete in the novel and your essay must develop TH/TS in a consistent way.
     Your task for Monday is to write another of the body ¶s of that essay. If you plan on using a revised version of the ¶ for the final essay, be sure you've planned the essay outline clearly and that ¶s follow a consistent line of thinking.
     I want to see ever stronger TH and TS, a clearer topic string, better transitions and more elaboration of quotations, in phrases following the quotations—more LTR, in other words. Look specifically at something in the quotation, just as we've been doing in class.
     Continue using the ¶ on Degen page 54 and this one about Razumikhin as models. Also use the sample strong ¶s in the Grading notes.
     Think and write in your natural voice.
     Before your TH, define your RE; specifically indicate the ¶'s organization method and explain why/how the choice complements your TH/TS; then specifically highlight each instance of the word that defines ¶'s topic string. Include your TH and the other TS you wrote and indicate where in the essay your developing ¶ belongs.
     Focus on editing marks TH (pages 224-25); TS (pages 220-23); P (pages 210-14); T (217-20); B (pages 192-96); and E (pages 198-202). Use Degen's concrete methods to improve your writing and thinking.      
     Paper copy due in class. Follow MLA format for heading, citations, and works cited page; and use only Times New Roman font size 12. An essay grade.
     In addition to a paper copy—which you will give to me—also have access to the digital version. You will upload to peergrade and to turnitin at the beginning of class.
     See Essay submission on the policy page for details. An essay grade.
 

Wednesday, October 18. Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT. See details above.

Monday, October 16. Crime and Punishment Part 5. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Monday, October 30. Crime and Punishment essay.

 

 

Crime and Punishment
reading schedule

Review the vocabulary list before reading.

Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development and on the novel's moral themes. They will be our focus.

When you read, note key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Due September 25: Parts 2 & 3, pages 89-278.
Due October 9: Part 4, pages 281-358.
Due October 16: Part 5, pages 361-436.
Due October 23: Part 6 & Epilogue, pages 439-551.

 

 

Crime and Punishment vocab lists

Crime and Punishment Part 1 list
Crime and Punishment Part 2 list
Crime and Punishment Part 3 list
Crime and Punishment Part 4 list
Crime and Punishment Part 5 list
Crime and Punishment Part 6, Epilogue list
zipgrade student ids

 

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight
LBH sentence crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center

 

 

Crime and Punishment essay

One of the most frequent and telling patterns in literature is repetition. Repetition clues us into what the author wants us to notice, what he or she thinks matters. As you continue to read Crime and Punishment, note some repeated element. You might see a word (one associated with a character, say), an image, a character's repeated action or thought, a setting, an allusion, a theme. See the list on page 94 in Degen. But be creative here. You might, for instance, choose something off the beaten track, comparing how Dostoevsky describes his characters, for instance, or the hidden clues in clothing. Don't think you need to slavishly follow my suggestions or Degen's list. Be open to growth, my friends. His questions for each category, are fine, but don't be limited to them. He lists some questions for each category, but don't be limited to them. Follow your own thinking and interests. Let your interest drive your thinking and writing. Remember the questions I asked you to write last week? Read this about asking good questions. And remember that literature shows you human truth.

You will devise your own topic by choosing one repeated element you find interesting, and over time discovering an interesting and insightful way of thinking about the repeated element. You will then define a way of organizing the essay, perhaps from those found in option two on pages 95-103 in Degen.

As you read the novel, record telling evidence about your repeated element, and do so in some organized way—front/back of your book; on paper; a doc; or using post-it notes or colored tabs. Notice what the novel's showing you about your element, what questions it prompts you to ask, what answers it offers. On each note record the questions you ask or the relevance you see to your category and cross reference examples as you go. The more you read, the more you should begin to find interesting questions and to enrich and clarify your thinking.

Read and think thematically. Here's a good introduction to theme. You will eventually link your repeated element to theme.

The patterns you discover and the questions you ask will lead you to an interesting thesis.

We'll finalize your topic and thesis later, in conference.

For this and all writing assignments, do no Googling or other research. Reading other people's ideas gets in the way of your own and often sends them packing. Who knows what you would have thought? Develop your own thinking and writing, your own ability to create a point of view. That matters more than you know. Use nothing other than your book, your class notes, and your own mind.

October 2-6

Monday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Bring Crime and Punishment and Degen. Our continued discussion of Crime and Punishment Parts 2, 3, & 4. We'll continue following the moments of Raskolnikov's confrontation with himself and his ideas to understand his moral transformation. Have your list of annotated passaged ready.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION due. Paper in class, upload to assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION at both turnitin and peergrade by 15:30. Remove your name from peergrade copy if you like. See Essay submission on the policy page for details.

Tonight. Work on peergrade, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION, due Friday by 15:30. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 5. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Peergrade edit of Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION due Friday by 15:30. A participation grade.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT due Monday. See assignment details under Assignment due in middle column.

 

 

Tuesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Bring Crime and Punishment and Degen. Our continued discussion of Crime and Punishment Parts 2, 3, & 4. We'll continue following the moments of Raskolnikov's confrontation with himself and his ideas to understand his moral transformation. Have your list of annotated passaged ready.

Tonight. Read these student ¶s. Evaluate TS, evidence, B, E in each. What would you do to each, were it your ¶?

Work on peergrade, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION, due Friday by 15:30. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 5. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Peergrade edit of Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION due Friday by 15:30. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT due Monday. See assignment details under Assignment due in middle column.

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. We'll look at some of your ¶s in class. No vocab. quiz.

Tonight. Find all the mentions of Sonya through Part 4, especially her interactions with Raskolnikov. What do you notice?

Work on peergrade edit, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION. I expect your comments to be specific, concrete, and rich. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 5. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Peergrade edit of Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL due Friday by 15:30. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT due Monday. See assignment details under Assignment due in middle column.

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Bring Crime and Punishment and Degen. Our continued discussion of Crime and Punishment Parts 2, 3, & 4. We'll continue following the moments of Raskolnikov's confrontation with himself and his ideas to understand his moral transformation. Have your list of annotated passaged ready.

Tonight. Continue making your list of passages for Crime and Punishment.

Work on peergrade edit, Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL. I expect your comments to be specific, concrete, and rich. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 5. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Peergrade edit of Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION due Friday by 15:30. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT due Monday. See assignment details under Assignment due in middle column.

 

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Bring Crime and Punishment and Degen. Our continued discussion of Crime and Punishment Parts 2, 3, & 4. We'll continue following the moments of Raskolnikov's confrontation with himself and his ideas to understand his moral transformation.

Peergrade, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION due by 15:30. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Tonight. Your choice.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 5, due Monday, October 16. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book. I'll be checking them for a quiz.

Due Monday. Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT. See details under Assignments due in middle column. In addition to a paper copy—which you will give to me—also have access to the digital version. You will upload to peergrade and to turnitin at the beginning of class.

Crime and Punishment
reading links

 

Character list
Chronology of Part 1 and map of Petersburg
Sample annotated opening pages
What C & P can teach you that the internet can't
Archbishop Rowan Williams on Dostoevsky
Raskolnikov's St. Petersburg, map of his travels

Articles on Crime and Punishment
Dostoevsky's empathy
Is reason always wrong? Kant's Categorical Imperative
Kant and Hume on morality
Reverence by Paul Woodruff
Paul Woodruff talks to Bill Moyers
A few words about plot by Justin Cronin
Crime and Punishment, a simple summary

 

 

Dostoevsky's characterization
Vladimir Nabokov

“Dostoyevsky characterizes his people through situation, through ethical matters, their psychological reactions, their inside ripples. After describing the looks of a character, he uses the old-fashioned device of not referring to his specific physical appearance anymore in the scenes with him. This is not the way of an artist—say Tolstoy—who sees his character in his mind all the time and knows exactly the specific gesture he will employ at this or that moment. But there is something more striking still about Dostoyevsky.”

 

 

On Dostoevsky
Charles Block

"So 10th grade, Crime and Punishment. After school, I started reading along with the class for the first time.
     "It got even weirder, because the pawnbroker Raskolnikov murders is a gruff woman. She reminded me a little of my mother. I think of my mom as a very kind person, but she never wanted to be a pawnbroker. She used to say, Don't tell people what we do. She always said, Tell people your parents are in sales. She didn't want people to judge us, I guess. In any case, she wasn't really suited for it. She was a nervous person who could get upset easily, and she didn't enjoy being down there. She could really not be easy with the customers.
     "So as Dostoyevsky presented this woman, who acts gruffly towards Raskolnikov and treats him with suspicion, it was not too hard to see the parallels—and that made me feel kind of sick. It was so much like what I knew. And in that familiar setting, the worst nightmare takes place. The murder is so clearly and so cleanly described.
     Dostoyevsky is fairly bloodless about this. There's no melodrama—it's very plain description. One thing that was strange to me, back then, was that we actually care about Raskolnikov. We want him to get away with murder. I could tell, even then, that the whole point of the book is that you want him to get away this, that you're rooting for him.
     "But how was I supposed to do that?
     "Other sections of the book also got to me—especially the fact that, after killing and robbing the woman, Raskolnikov returns home and goes to sleep. That, I understood: It's what I do all the time. When I was fifteen and had my learner's permit, I drove my dad's car into a wall. Afterwards, I went home and got in bed and tried to hide. It's what I still do, even now, after any failure or bad thing—when my teeth hurt, or I'm trying to figure something out, or I'm at an impasse in my work, one of the things I do is take a nap. I consider myself one of the world's great nappers. I'll set my alarm for ten minutes, and I'm not sure if I fall asleep or not, but I sit there thinking and relax.
     "To see that someone knew the human condition this deeply. I remember thinking, how does Dostoyevsky know I do this? It had a profound effect on me. The writer of this book had somehow created intimate connections between my life in Las Vegas and 19th-century Russia. I understood, for the first time, that there is a deeper truth going on in fiction. I don't think it changed my everyday malaise, or my lostness. That wasn't going to change for a long time. But, I do think some larger doors started to open—in my understanding of what people can know, of what literature might be."

 

 

Empthy versus sympathy

"In 1909, the psychologist Edward Titchener translated the German Einfhlung ('feeling into') into English as empathy. Empathy can be defined as a person's ability to recognize and share the emotions of another person, fictional character, or sentient being. It involves, first, seeing someone else's situation from his perspective, and, second, sharing his emotions, including, if any, his distress.
     "For me to share in someone else's perspective, I must do more than merely put myself into his position. Instead, I must imagine myself as him, and, more than that, imagine myself as him in the particular situation in which he finds himself. I cannot empathize with an abstract or detached feeling. To empathize with a particular person, I need to have at least some knowledge of who he is and what he is doing or trying to do. As John Steinbeck wrote, 'It means very little to know that a million Chinese are starving unless you know one Chinese who is starving.'
     "Empathy is often confused with pity, sympathy, and compassion, which are each reactions to the plight of others. Pity is a feeling of discomfort at the distress of one or more sentient beings, and often has paternalistic or condescending overtones. Implicit in the notion of pity is that its object does not deserve its plight, and, moreover, is unable to prevent, reverse, or overturn it. Pity is less engaged than empathy, sympathy, or compassion, amounting to little more than a conscious acknowledgement of the plight of its object."

 

 

Russian modernist film
Man with a movie camera
Dziga Vertov

 

 

Russian stop-motion animation
Hedgehog in the fog
Yuri Norstein

Assignments due
read them in full

 

Friday, October 6. Peergrade, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION due by 15:30. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. Not to give feedback violates one of the fundamental principles that has made human society work: reciprocation, or the Golden Rule by another name. Read the Iliad sometime to see what happens when men forget reciprocal bonds. Agamemenon learns the hard way. Don't be Agamemnon. Treat your fellow students with honor and respect.

Monday, October 9. Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT.
     Now that you've learned a bit more about writing body ¶s and written two, turn your practice to your repeated element and the upcoming essay on Crime and Punishment.
     Write the best, clearest, most interesting TH you can about how you're currently thinking about your repeataed element (RE). Look at several instances of your RE. Work from the page, noticing the clues Dostoevsky places there. What do you notice? What associations do you make, what thematic idea bubbles through them? What does RE tell you about that theme? Is your RE about love, about the power of noble feelings, about restoring the human community, about the dangers of intellect, the good of emotion? Find the theme and define what RE tells you about that theme. Knowing what RE says about theme will point you to a good TH, and a good TH is a lot. You shouldn't move forward until you're satisfied with your TH. That's step one.
     Step two is to define the topics your TH needs to cover. Ask yourself if developing a few instances of RE will be interesting and compelling. If so, define what each instance shows you about TH. Doing that points you to a series of TS. Be wise when choosing instances to discuss. You want them to reveal aspects of TH or to open up deeper stuff about TH. Once you've done this you have a conceptual outline of the essay.
     Your thinking will change as you continue to read, that's fine. Work with what you think now. Imagine an essay developing your TH and write at least three TS, the best you can now. Make those TS follow a clear focus reflecting how you're thinking about your TH from the novel. Are you looking at Raskolnikov's moments of rationalizing his justification for the murder? At Luzhin's utilitarian thinking? Whatever you're doing, your RE must be fairly concrete in the novel and your essay must develop TH/TS in a consistent way.
     Your task for Monday is to write one of the body ¶s of that essay. (You might use the ¶ in the final essay if it fits, but don't worry about that now. Focus on improving your body ¶ writing skills.) I want to see ever stronger TH and TS, a clearer topic string, better transitions and more elaboration of quotations, in phrases following the quotations—more LTR, in other words. Look specifically at something in the quotation, just as we've been doing in class.
     Continue using the ¶ on Degen page 54 and this one about Razumikhin as models.
     Think and write in your natural voice.
     Before your TH, define your RE; specifically indicate the ¶'s organization method and explain why/how the choice complements your TH/TS; then specifically identify the word that defines ¶'s topic string. Include your TH and the other TS you wrote and indicate where in the essay your developing ¶ belongs.
     Focus on editing marks TH (pages 224-25); TS (pages 220-23); P (pages 210-14); T (217-20); B (pages 192-96); and E (pages 198-202). Use Degen's concrete methods to improve your writing and thinking.      
     Paper copy due in class. Follow MLA format for heading, citations, and works cited page; and use only Times New Roman font size 12. An essay grade. In addition to a paper copy—which you will give to me—also have access to the digital version. You will upload to peergrade and to turnitin at the beginning of class.
See Essay submission on the policy page for details. An essay grade.

Monday, October 16. Crime and Punishment Part 5. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

 

 

Crime and Punishment
reading schedule

Review the vocabulary list before reading.

Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development and on the novel's moral themes. They will be our focus.

When you read, note key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Due September 25: Parts 2 & 3, pages 89-278.
Due October 9: Part 4, pages 281-358.
Due October 16: Part 5, pages 361-436.
Due October 23: Part 6 & Epilogue, pages 439-551.

 

 

Crime and Punishment vocab lists

Crime and Punishment Part 1 list
Crime and Punishment Part 2 list
Crime and Punishment Part 3 list
Crime and Punishment Part 4 list
Crime and Punishment Part 5 list
Crime and Punishment Part 6, Epilogue list
zipgrade student ids

 

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight
LBH sentence crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center

 

 

Crime and Punishment essay

One of the most frequent and telling patterns in literature is repetition. Repetition clues us into what the author wants us to notice, what he or she thinks matters. As you continue to read Crime and Punishment, note some repeated element. You might see a word (one associated with a character, say), an image, a character's repeated action or thought, a setting, an allusion, a theme. See the list on page 94 in Degen. But be creative here. You might, for instance, choose something off the beaten track, comparing how Dostoevsky describes his characters, for instance, or the hidden clues in clothing. Don't think you need to slavishly follow my suggestions or Degen's list. Be open to growth, my friends. His questions for each category, are fine, but don't be limited to them. He lists some questions for each category, but don't be limited to them. Follow your own thinking and interests. Let your interest drive your thinking and writing. Remember the questions I asked you to write last week? Read this about asking good questions. And remember that literature shows you human truth.

You will devise your own topic by choosing one repeated element you find interesting, and over time discovering an interesting and insightful way of thinking about the repeated element. You will then define a way of organizing the essay, perhaps from those found in option two on pages 95-103 in Degen.

As you read the novel, record telling evidence about your repeated element, and do so in some organized way—front/back of your book; on paper; a doc; or using post-it notes or colored tabs. Notice what the novel's showing you about your element, what questions it prompts you to ask, what answers it offers. On each note record the questions you ask or the relevance you see to your category and cross reference examples as you go. The more you read, the more you should begin to find interesting questions and to enrich and clarify your thinking.

Read and think thematically. Here's a good introduction to theme. You will eventually link your repeated element to theme.

The patterns you discover and the questions you ask will lead you to an interesting thesis.

We'll finalize your topic and thesis later, in conference.

For this and all writing assignments, do no Googling or other research. Reading other people's ideas gets in the way of your own and often sends them packing. Who knows what you would have thought? Develop your own thinking and writing, your own ability to create a point of view. That matters more than you know. Use nothing other than your book, your class notes, and your own mind.

September 25-29

Monday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Bring Crime and Punishment and Degen. Our beginning discussion of Crime and Punishment Parts 2 & 3. Let's review the novel's moral universe, defining some key terms and introducing one more, Sonya. What thematic context does the novel create? How do we use that context to define how we might think about Raskolnikov?

Let's define some of the big questions for Parts 2 & 3. Write of few of those questions on the Parts 2 & 3 tab of the previously shared Google Sheet. Then let's find some ways of thinking about those questions—by seeing how the novel shows those questions to us. Do we, for instance, look for how Raskolnikov emotionally and intellectually reacts to his crime, his guilt, people, and the world? Do we look for big changes in how Raskolnikov thinks about his crime? We're always looking for how the novel shows us.

Then, let's find some passages from Part 2 that show us the effects of the crime on Raskolnikov and connect those effects to the novel's moral themes.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ due. Paper in class, upload to assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL at both turnitin and peergrade by 15:30. Remove your name from peergrade copy. See Essay submission on the policy page for details.

Tonight. Work on peergrade, Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL, due Friday by 15:30. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 4—due Monday—and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development and on the novel's moral themes. They will be our focus.

When you read, note key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes, and use L1, L2, L3 to practice analytical reading. Have your passages ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Peergrade edit of Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL due Friday by 15:30. A participation grade.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION. Now that you've received feedback on your ¶, revise it not only to "correct" the marked "errors" but also to truly revise—by improving every aspect of the thinking and writing. Revision means re-seeing. Do that. By spadefuls. I especially want to see better transitions and more elaboration of quotations, in phrases following the quotations—more LTR, in other words. Due Monday, October 2. See details in Assignments due.

 

 

Tuesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Bring Crime and Punishment and Degen. Crime and Punishment Part 2 discussion.

Tonight. Study for tomorrow's vocab. quiz, Crime and Punishment Part 3.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 4—due Monday—and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development and on the novel's moral themes. They will be our focus.

When you read, note key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes, and use L1, L2, L3 to practice analytical reading. Have your passages ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Peergrade edit of Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL due Friday by 15:30. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION. Now that you've received feedback on your ¶, revise it not only to "correct" the marked "errors" but also to truly revise—by improving every aspect of the thinking and writing. Revision means re-seeing. Do that. By spadefuls. I especially want to see better transitions and more elaboration of quotations, in phrases following the quotations—more LTR, in other words. Due Monday, October 2. See details in Assignments due.

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Vocab. quiz Crime and Punishment Part 3. Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL due for Kairogians.

Tonight. Follow Raskolnikov through Parts 2 & 3, noting some key moments that define his moral development. Find the moments when you see him learn something about himself or his ideas, about his humanity. What traits does he show? Why does he show those traits at those moments? Notice that the novel is forcing Raskolnikov to confront himself and his ideas—forcing him to change. Make a list of passages that chart his change. Tomorrow I will want to see a list of passages annotated.

Work on peergrade edit, Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL. I expect your comments to be specific, concrete, and rich. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 4—due Monday—and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development and on the novel's moral themes. They will be our focus.

When you read, note key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes, and use L1, L2, L3 to practice analytical reading. Have your passages ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Peergrade edit of Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL due Friday by 15:30. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION. Now that you've received feedback on your ¶, revise it not only to "correct" the marked "errors" but also to truly revise—by improving every aspect of the thinking and writing. Revision means re-seeing. Do that. By spadefuls. I especially want to see better transitions and more elaboration of quotations, in phrases following the quotations—more LTR, in other words. Due Monday, October 2. See details in Assignments due.

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Bring Crime and Punishment and Degen. Crime and Punishment Part 3 discussion.

Tonight. Continue making your list of passages for Crime and Punishment.

Work on peergrade edit, Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL. I expect your comments to be specific, concrete, and rich. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 4—due Monday—and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development and on the novel's moral themes. They will be our focus.

When you read, note key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes, and use L1, L2, L3 to practice analytical reading. Have your passages ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Peergrade edit of Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL due Friday by 15:30. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION. Now that you've received feedback on your ¶, revise it not only to "correct" the marked "errors" but also to truly revise—by improving every aspect of the thinking and writing. Revision means re-seeing. Do that. By spadefuls. I especially want to see better transitions and more elaboration of quotations, in phrases following the quotations—more LTR, in other words. Due Monday, October 2. See details in Assignments due.

 

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Bring Crime and Punishment and Degen. Crime and Punishment Part 3 discussion.

Peergrade, Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL due by 15:30. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment.

Tonight.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 4 —due Monday—and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development and on the novel's moral themes. They will be our focus.

When you read, note key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes, and use L1, L2, L3 to practice analytical reading. Have your passages ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Due Monday. Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION. Now that you've received feedback on your ¶, revise it not only to "correct" the marked "errors" but also to truly revise—by improving every aspect of the thinking and writing. Revision means re-seeing. Do that. By spadefuls. I want to see a stronger TH and TS, a clear topic string, better transitions and more elaboration of quotations, in phrases following the quotations—more LTR, in other words. Look specifically at something in the quotation. Before your TH, I also want you to specifically indicate the organization method and the word that will define your topic string. Include your thesis and the other topic sentences you wrote and indicate where in the essay your developing ¶ belongs. Focus on editing marks TS, P, T4, and B. Paper copy in class, upload to assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION at both peergrade and turnitin by 15:30. See Essay submission on the policy page for details. Follow MLA format for heading, citations, and works cited page; and use only Times New Roman font size 12. An essay grade.

Crime and Punishment
reading links

 

Character list
Chronology of Part 1 and map of Petersburg
Sample annotated opening pages
What C & P can teach you that the internet can't
Archbishop Rowan Williams on Dostoevsky
Raskolnikov's St. Petersburg, map of his travels

Articles on Crime and Punishment
Dostoevsky's empathy
Is reason always wrong? Kant's Categorical Imperative
Kant and Hume on morality
Reverence by Paul Woodruff
Paul Woodruff talks to Bill Moyers
A few words about plot by Justin Cronin

 

 

Dostoevsky's characterization
Vladimir Nabokov

“Dostoyevsky characterizes his people through situation, through ethical matters, their psychological reactions, their inside ripples. After describing the looks of a character, he uses the old-fashioned device of not referring to his specific physical appearance anymore in the scenes with him. This is not the way of an artist—say Tolstoy—who sees his character in his mind all the time and knows exactly the specific gesture he will employ at this or that moment. But there is something more striking still about Dostoyevsky.”

 

 

On Dostoevsky
Charles Block

"So 10th grade, Crime and Punishment. After school, I started reading along with the class for the first time.
     "It got even weirder, because the pawnbroker Raskolnikov murders is a gruff woman. She reminded me a little of my mother. I think of my mom as a very kind person, but she never wanted to be a pawnbroker. She used to say, Don't tell people what we do. She always said, Tell people your parents are in sales. She didn't want people to judge us, I guess. In any case, she wasn't really suited for it. She was a nervous person who could get upset easily, and she didn't enjoy being down there. She could really not be easy with the customers.
     "So as Dostoyevsky presented this woman, who acts gruffly towards Raskolnikov and treats him with suspicion, it was not too hard to see the parallels—and that made me feel kind of sick. It was so much like what I knew. And in that familiar setting, the worst nightmare takes place. The murder is so clearly and so cleanly described.
     Dostoyevsky is fairly bloodless about this. There's no melodrama—it's very plain description. One thing that was strange to me, back then, was that we actually care about Raskolnikov. We want him to get away with murder. I could tell, even then, that the whole point of the book is that you want him to get away this, that you're rooting for him.
     "But how was I supposed to do that?
     "Other sections of the book also got to me—especially the fact that, after killing and robbing the woman, Raskolnikov returns home and goes to sleep. That, I understood: It's what I do all the time. When I was fifteen and had my learner's permit, I drove my dad's car into a wall. Afterwards, I went home and got in bed and tried to hide. It's what I still do, even now, after any failure or bad thing—when my teeth hurt, or I'm trying to figure something out, or I'm at an impasse in my work, one of the things I do is take a nap. I consider myself one of the world's great nappers. I'll set my alarm for ten minutes, and I'm not sure if I fall asleep or not, but I sit there thinking and relax.
     "To see that someone knew the human condition this deeply. I remember thinking, how does Dostoyevsky know I do this? It had a profound effect on me. The writer of this book had somehow created intimate connections between my life in Las Vegas and 19th-century Russia. I understood, for the first time, that there is a deeper truth going on in fiction. I don't think it changed my everyday malaise, or my lostness. That wasn't going to change for a long time. But, I do think some larger doors started to open—in my understanding of what people can know, of what literature might be."

 

 

Empthy versus sympathy

"In 1909, the psychologist Edward Titchener translated the German Einfhlung ('feeling into') into English as empathy. Empathy can be defined as a person's ability to recognize and share the emotions of another person, fictional character, or sentient being. It involves, first, seeing someone else's situation from his perspective, and, second, sharing his emotions, including, if any, his distress.
     "For me to share in someone else's perspective, I must do more than merely put myself into his position. Instead, I must imagine myself as him, and, more than that, imagine myself as him in the particular situation in which he finds himself. I cannot empathize with an abstract or detached feeling. To empathize with a particular person, I need to have at least some knowledge of who he is and what he is doing or trying to do. As John Steinbeck wrote, 'It means very little to know that a million Chinese are starving unless you know one Chinese who is starving.'
     "Empathy is often confused with pity, sympathy, and compassion, which are each reactions to the plight of others. Pity is a feeling of discomfort at the distress of one or more sentient beings, and often has paternalistic or condescending overtones. Implicit in the notion of pity is that its object does not deserve its plight, and, moreover, is unable to prevent, reverse, or overturn it. Pity is less engaged than empathy, sympathy, or compassion, amounting to little more than a conscious acknowledgement of the plight of its object."

 

 

Russian modernist film
Man with a movie camera
Dziga Vertov

Assignments due
read them in full

 

Wednesday, September 27. Vocab. quiz Crime and Punishment Part 3.

Monday, September 25 (Wednesday, September 27 for Kairogians). Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL. Include your thesis and the other topic sentences you wrote and indicate where in the essay your developing ¶ belongs. Focus on editing marks TS and P. Paper copy in class, upload to assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL at both peergrade and turnitin by 15:30. See Essay submission on the policy page for details. Follow MLA format for heading, citations, and works cited page; and use only Times New Roman font size 12. An essay grade. Here's a sample ¶. The ¶ on page 54 of Degen is a good model, too. Use the Day Three: Checking body ¶s list on page 248 as a basic revision checklist. And remember that all writing is practice and that no writing is perfect. Improvement, not perfection, is the goal. Writers must learn to follow Hamlet and "Let be" (Hamlet 5.2.237).

Friday, September 29. Peergrade, Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL due by 15:30. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. Not to give feedback violates one of the fundamental principles that has made human society work: reciprocation, or the Golden Rule by another name. Read the Iliad sometime to see what happens when men forget reciprocal bonds. Agamemenon learns the hard way. Don't be Agamemnon. Treat your fellow students with honor and respect.

Monday, October 2. Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION. Now that you've received feedback on your ¶, revise it not only to "correct" the marked "errors" but also to truly revise—by improving every aspect of the thinking and writing. Revision means re-seeing. Do that. By spadefuls. I want to see a stronger TH and TS, a clear topic string, better transitions and more elaboration of quotations, in phrases following the quotations—more LTR, in other words. Look specifically at something in the quotation. Before your TH, I also want you to specifically indicate the organization method and the word that will define your topic string. Include your thesis and the other topic sentences you wrote and indicate where in the essay your developing ¶ belongs. Focus on editing marks TS, P, T4, and B. Paper copy in class, upload to assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION at both peergrade and turnitin by 15:30. See Essay submission on the policy page for details. Follow MLA format for heading, citations, and works cited page; and use only Times New Roman font size 12. An essay grade.

Monday, October 2. Crime and Punishment Part 4. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development and on the novel's moral themes. They will be our focus.

When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

 

 

Two extra extra-credit opps
for September

1. Compose a metapor or simile for Harvey. Before you begin, read about metaphor and simile at poetryfoundation.org.

2. You probably shouldn't judge a book by its cover, but the cover should offer some clue about the book. Take a look at the cover of Crime and Punishment and explain its relevance to the novel. Put your analytical voice to work, using Levels 1, 2, and 3. See more book cover designs here.

Choose one, which you can do in addition to a movie or poem.

 

 

Crime and Punishment
reading schedule

Review the vocabulary list before reading.

Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development and on the novel's moral themes. They will be our focus.

When you read, note key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Due September 25: Parts 2 & 3, pages 89-278.
Due October 2: Part 4, pages 281-358.
Due October 9: Part 5, pages 361-436.
Due October 16: Part 6 & Epilogue, pages 439-551.

 

 

Crime and Punishment vocab lists

Crime and Punishment Part 1 list
Crime and Punishment Part 2 list
Crime and Punishment Part 3 list
Crime and Punishment Part 4 list
Crime and Punishment Part 5 list
Crime and Punishment Part 6, Epilogue list
zipgrade student ids

 

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight
LBH sentence crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center

 

 

Crime and Punishment essay

One of the most frequent and telling patterns in literature is repetition. Repetition clues us into what the author wants us to notice, what he or she thinks matters. As you continue to read Crime and Punishment, note some repeated element. You might see a word (one associated with a character, say), an image, a character's repeated action or thought, a setting, an allusion, a theme. See the list on page 94 in Degen. But be creative here. You might, for instance, choose something off the beaten track, comparing how Dostoevsky describes his characters, for instance, or the hidden clues in clothing. Don't think you need to slavishly follow my suggestions or Degen's list. Be open to growth, my friends. His questions for each category, are fine, but don't be limited to them. He lists some questions for each category, but don't be limited to them. Follow your own thinking and interests. Let your interest drive your thinking and writing. Remember the questions I asked you to write last week? Read this about asking good questions. And remember that literature shows you human truth.

You will devise your own topic by choosing one repeated element you find interesting, and over time discovering an interesting and insightful way of thinking about the repeated element. You will then define a way of organizing the essay, perhaps from those found in option two on pages 95-103 in Degen.

As you read the novel, record telling evidence about your repeated element, and do so in some organized way—front/back of your book; on paper; a doc; or using post-it notes or colored tabs. Notice what the novel's showing you about your element, what questions it prompts you to ask, what answers it offers. On each note record the questions you ask or the relevance you see to your category and cross reference examples as you go. The more you read, the more you should begin to find interesting questions and to enrich and clarify your thinking.

Read and think thematically. Here's a good introduction to theme. You will eventually link your repeated element to theme.

The patterns you discover and the questions you ask will lead you to an interesting thesis.

We'll finalize your topic and thesis later, in conference.

For this and all writing assignments, do no Googling or other research. Reading other people's ideas gets in the way of your own and often sends them packing. Who knows what you would have thought? Develop your own thinking and writing, your own ability to create a point of view. That matters more than you know. Use nothing other than your book, your class notes, and your own mind.

 

 

Russian stop-motion animation
Hedgehog in the fog
Yuri Norstein

September 18-22

Monday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Learn editing symbol TS. Study Degen 54-55 and 220-23. Review sample ¶ page 54 and label L1, L2, L3 evidence and thinking to see how a ¶ works; consider ¶ development; review your ¶ TS.

By the end of class today you should know editing symbol TS and all of its components; ¶ unity and coherence; ¶ development basics. You should see ways to improve the TS of your ¶.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT due to peergrade assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT today by 15:30. Remove your name from the upload. Peergrade hand-in closes at 15:30. Upload, editing, response a participation grade.

Tonight. Read Trimble, Writing with Style chapters 1 & 2. Learn some thinking basics and some additional drafting strategies.

Here's the Google Doc from class with the wolves ¶. Find another solution to the em dashes of the final sentence and define the ordering principle of the locations. How are the locations ordered and why does that order make sense given the TS? And define whether the Oranges ¶ is unified and coherent. Define the means through which the ¶ achieves coherence.

Ongoing. Peergrade edit Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT due Friday by 15:30. A participation grade.

Be reading Crime and Punishment Parts 2 & 3 and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development and on the novel's moral themes. They will be our focus.

When you read, note key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes, and use L1, L2, L3 to practice analytical reading. Have your passages ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

 

 

Tuesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. ¶ drafting strategy one, organization method. Learn editing symbol P. Review Trimble chapters 1 & 2. Study Degen 59-64; 210-14.

By the end of class today you should know some concrete thinking and drafting basics and understand the edting symbol P 1-4 and have begun to apply that knowledge to your Crime and Punishment ¶.

Tonight. Study for tomorrow's vocab. quiz, Crime and Punishment Part 2. Work on peergrade edit Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Parts 2 & 3 and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development and on the novel's moral themes. They will be our focus.

When you read, note key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes, and use L1, L2, L3 to practice analytical reading. Have your passages ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Peergrade edit Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT due Friday by 15:30.

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Vocab. quiz Crime and Punishment Part 2.

Tonight. Work on peergrade edit Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Parts 2 & 3 and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development and on the novel's moral themes. They will be our focus.

When you read, note key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes, and use L1, L2, L3 to practice analytical reading. Have your passages ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Peergrade edit Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT due Friday by 15:30.

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. ¶ drafting strategy 2, transitions. Learn editing symbol A. Study Degen 64-66; 189-92.

By the end of class today you should know several concrete strategies for using transitions in your writing and have begun to apply them to your Crime and Punishment ¶.

Tonight. Work on peergrade edit Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Parts 2 & 3 and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development and on the novel's moral themes. They will be our focus.

When you read, note key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes, and use L1, L2, L3 to practice analytical reading. Have your passages ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Peergrade edit Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT due Friday by 15:30.

 

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. ¶ drafting strategy 3, maintain topic string. Learn editing symbols T, B, and E. Study Degen 66-71; 217-20; 192-96; 198-202.

Peergrade edit Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT due by 15:30 today. Peergrade editing closes today at 15:30.

Tonight. Take a break.

Monday. Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL due. Include your thesis and the other topic sentences you wrote and indicate where in the essay your developing ¶ belongs. Focus on editing marks TS and P. Paper copy in class, upload to assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL at both peergrade and turnitin by 15:30. See Essay submission on the policy page for details. Follow MLA format for heading, citations, and works cited page; and use only Times New Roman font size 12. An essay grade. Here's a sample ¶. The ¶ on page 54 of Degen is a good model, too. Use the Day Three: Checking body ¶s list on page 248 as a basic revision checklist. And remember that all writing is practice and that no writing is perfect. Improvement, not perfection, is the goal. Writers must learn to follow Hamlet and "Let be" (Hamlet 5.2.237).

Crime and Punishment Parts 2 & 3 due.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 4 and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development and on the novel's moral themes. They will be our focus.

When you read, note key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes, and use L1, L2, L3 to practice analytical reading. Have your passages ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Crime and Punishment
reading links

 

Character list
Chronology of Part 1 and map of Petersburg
Sample annotated opening pages
What C & P can teach you that the internet can't
Archbishop Rowan Williams on Dostoevsky
Raskolnikov's St. Petersburg, map of his travels

Articles on Crime and Punishment
Dostoevsky's empathy
Is reason always wrong? Kant's Categorical Imperative
Kant and Hume on morality
Reverence by Paul Woodruff
Paul Woodruff talks to Bill Moyers
A few words about plot by Justin Cronin

 

 

Dostoevsky's characterization
Vladimir Nabokov

“Dostoyevsky characterizes his people through situation, through ethical matters, their psychological reactions, their inside ripples. After describing the looks of a character, he uses the old-fashioned device of not referring to his specific physical appearance anymore in the scenes with him. This is not the way of an artist—say Tolstoy—who sees his character in his mind all the time and knows exactly the specific gesture he will employ at this or that moment. But there is something more striking still about Dostoyevsky.”

 

 

On Dostoevsky
Charles Block

"So 10th grade, Crime and Punishment. After school, I started reading along with the class for the first time.
     "It got even weirder, because the pawnbroker Raskolnikov murders is a gruff woman. She reminded me a little of my mother. I think of my mom as a very kind person, but she never wanted to be a pawnbroker. She used to say, Don't tell people what we do. She always said, Tell people your parents are in sales. She didn't want people to judge us, I guess. In any case, she wasn't really suited for it. She was a nervous person who could get upset easily, and she didn't enjoy being down there. She could really not be easy with the customers.
     "So as Dostoyevsky presented this woman, who acts gruffly towards Raskolnikov and treats him with suspicion, it was not too hard to see the parallels—and that made me feel kind of sick. It was so much like what I knew. And in that familiar setting, the worst nightmare takes place. The murder is so clearly and so cleanly described.
     Dostoyevsky is fairly bloodless about this. There's no melodrama—it's very plain description. One thing that was strange to me, back then, was that we actually care about Raskolnikov. We want him to get away with murder. I could tell, even then, that the whole point of the book is that you want him to get away this, that you're rooting for him.
     "But how was I supposed to do that?
     "Other sections of the book also got to me—especially the fact that, after killing and robbing the woman, Raskolnikov returns home and goes to sleep. That, I understood: It's what I do all the time. When I was fifteen and had my learner's permit, I drove my dad's car into a wall. Afterwards, I went home and got in bed and tried to hide. It's what I still do, even now, after any failure or bad thing—when my teeth hurt, or I'm trying to figure something out, or I'm at an impasse in my work, one of the things I do is take a nap. I consider myself one of the world's great nappers. I'll set my alarm for ten minutes, and I'm not sure if I fall asleep or not, but I sit there thinking and relax.
     "To see that someone knew the human condition this deeply. I remember thinking, how does Dostoyevsky know I do this? It had a profound effect on me. The writer of this book had somehow created intimate connections between my life in Las Vegas and 19th-century Russia. I understood, for the first time, that there is a deeper truth going on in fiction. I don't think it changed my everyday malaise, or my lostness. That wasn't going to change for a long time. But, I do think some larger doors started to open—in my understanding of what people can know, of what literature might be."

 

 

Empthy versus sympathy

"In 1909, the psychologist Edward Titchener translated the German Einfhlung ('feeling into') into English as empathy. Empathy can be defined as a person's ability to recognize and share the emotions of another person, fictional character, or sentient being. It involves, first, seeing someone else's situation from his perspective, and, second, sharing his emotions, including, if any, his distress.
     "For me to share in someone else's perspective, I must do more than merely put myself into his position. Instead, I must imagine myself as him, and, more than that, imagine myself as him in the particular situation in which he finds himself. I cannot empathize with an abstract or detached feeling. To empathize with a particular person, I need to have at least some knowledge of who he is and what he is doing or trying to do. As John Steinbeck wrote, 'It means very little to know that a million Chinese are starving unless you know one Chinese who is starving.'
     "Empathy is often confused with pity, sympathy, and compassion, which are each reactions to the plight of others. Pity is a feeling of discomfort at the distress of one or more sentient beings, and often has paternalistic or condescending overtones. Implicit in the notion of pity is that its object does not deserve its plight, and, moreover, is unable to prevent, reverse, or overturn it. Pity is less engaged than empathy, sympathy, or compassion, amounting to little more than a conscious acknowledgement of the plight of its object."

 

 

Russian modernist film
Man with a movie camera
Dziga Vertov

Assignments due

 

Wednesday, September 20. Vocab. quiz Crime and Punishment Part 2.

Friday, September 22 by 15:30. Peergrade editing of Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT.

Monday, September 25 (Wednesday, September 27 for Kairogians). Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL. Include your thesis and the other topic sentences you wrote and indicate where in the essay your developing ¶ belongs. Focus on editing marks TS and P. Paper copy in class, upload to assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL at both peergrade and turnitin by 15:30. See Essay submission on the policy page for details. Follow MLA format for heading, citations, and works cited page; and use only Times New Roman font size 12. An essay grade. Here's a sample ¶. The ¶ on page 54 of Degen is a good model, too. Use the Day Three: Checking body ¶s list on page 248 as a basic revision checklist. And remember that all writing is practice and that no writing is perfect. Improvement, not perfection, is the goal. Writers must learn to follow Hamlet and "Let be" (Hamlet 5.2.237).

Monday, September 25. Crime and Punishment Parts 2 & 3. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development and on the novel's moral themes. They will be our focus.

When you read, note key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

 

 

Two extra extra-credit opps
for September

1. Compose a metapor or simile for Harvey. Before you begin, read about metaphor and simile at poetryfoundation.org.

2. You probably shouldn't judge a book by its cover, but the cover should offer some clue about the book. Take a look at the cover of Crime and Punishment and explain its relevance to the novel. Put your analytical voice to work, using Levels 1, 2, and 3. See more book cover designs here.

Choose one, which you can do in addition to a movie or poem.

 

 

Crime and Punishment
reading schedule

Review the vocabulary list before reading.

Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development and on the novel's moral themes. They will be our focus.

When you read, note key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Due September 25: Parts 2 & 3, pages 89-278.
Due October 2: Part 4, pages 281-358.
Due October 9: Part 5, pages 361-436.
Due October 16: Part 6 & Epilogue, pages 439-551.

 

 

Crime and Punishment vocab lists

Crime and Punishment Part 1 list
Crime and Punishment Part 2 list
Crime and Punishment Part 3 list
Crime and Punishment Part 4 list
Crime and Punishment Part 5 list
Crime and Punishment Part 6, Epilogue list
zipgrade student ids

 

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight
LBH sentence crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center

 

 

Crime and Punishment essay

One of the most frequent and telling patterns in literature is repetition. Repetition clues us into what the author wants us to notice, what he or she thinks matters. As you continue to read Crime and Punishment, note some repeated element. You might see a word (one associated with a character, say), an image, a character's repeated action or thought, a setting, an allusion, a theme. See the list on page 94 in Degen. But be creative here. You might, for instance, choose something off the beaten track, comparing how Dostoevsky describes his characters, for instance, or the hidden clues in clothing. Don't think you need to slavishly follow my suggestions or Degen's list. Be open to growth, my friends. His questions for each category, are fine, but don't be limited to them. He lists some questions for each category, but don't be limited to them. Follow your own thinking and interests. Let your interest drive your thinking and writing. Remember the questions I asked you to write last week? Read this about asking good questions. And remember that literature shows you human truth.

You will devise your own topic by choosing one repeated element you find interesting, and over time discovering an interesting and insightful way of thinking about the repeated element. You will then define a way of organizing the essay, perhaps from those found in option two on pages 95-103 in Degen.

As you read the novel, record telling evidence about your repeated element, and do so in some organized way—front/back of your book; on paper; a doc; or using post-it notes or colored tabs. Notice what the novel's showing you about your element, what questions it prompts you to ask, what answers it offers. On each note record the questions you ask or the relevance you see to your category and cross reference examples as you go. The more you read, the more you should begin to find interesting questions and to enrich and clarify your thinking.

Read and think thematically. Here's a good introduction to theme. You will eventually link your repeated element to theme.

The patterns you discover and the questions you ask will lead you to an interesting thesis.

We'll finalize your topic and thesis later, in conference.

For this and all writing assignments, do no Googling or other research. Reading other people's ideas gets in the way of your own and often sends them packing. Who knows what you would have thought? Develop your own thinking and writing, your own ability to create a point of view. That matters more than you know. Use nothing other than your book, your class notes, and your own mind.

 

 

Russian stop-motion animation
Hedgehog in the fog
Yuri Norstein

September 11-15

Monday

 

 

 

 

 

This week we'll regroup and begin actually discussing Crime and Punishment Part 1. Bring the questions you wrote some time ago. We'll also introduce developing an analytical voice from Degen.

So on Monday, bring Crime and Punishment and Degen. We'll look at Crime and Punishment Part 1 chapters 1 & 2.

Bring your ¶ response to Part 2 quiz to class on Tuesday.

The work of next week: Body ¶ writing. Bring Degen, Dostoevsky, and Trimble.

The week's assignments are those of last week. But I have changed the due dates for the writing, the vocab. practice, and the reading schedule of Crime and Punishment.

Here's what we would have covered last week, or most of it. I've not included the material about developing an analytical voice.

Continue reading Crime and Punishment Part 3. See the new Crime and Punishment reading schedule in the middle column.

The quiz over Part 2 happens Tuesday, September 12, though we'll not begin discussing Part 2 until next week. See the newly revised reading schedule. You should now be able to read comfortably ahead of schedule.

The body ¶ DRAFT is due Friday, September 15, with the same expectations. See the assignment beneath Assignments due. This body ¶ assignment replaces the summer essay, which is no longer relevant.

The body ¶ FINAL is due Monday, September 18. See the assignment beneath Assignments due. Make special note of the format requirements. Learn how to write the proper MLA citation at the MLA style center. See link beneath Essay documents in the middle column.

That said, it would be really helpful if you have read about ¶ writing on your own. Last week we would have covered Degen chapter 3, pages 53-88, learning the editing symbols TS, E, P1, A1, A2, A3, T1; and B1, B2, B3 on pages 192-196.

That's a lot of information, but you're familiar with some of it already, and the concepts are pretty concrete. Learn the principles and practice using them as you draft your body ¶ DRAFT.

We'll cover that material this week, quickly, I hope.

Just as I didn't follow everything Degen said about TH, I don't follow or even endorse everything he says about the new writing concepts. He likes fluffy, overblown writing in a way I and most college professors don't; and he favors a general way of thinking and writing that I and college professors don't. I want you to be specific, precise, and concrete, to think from evidence in a way Degen doesn't. I want you to show your thinking more fully and precisely than his models show.

But the writing 101 concepts he covers are solid and the stuff of good witing here and everywhere. Learn them and empower your writing. Forever.

Also begin reviewing and learning Crime and Punishment vocab. list 2, linked in the middle column under Crime and Punishment vocab lists. We'll have a quiz the week after next. You'd be smart to review the words and to learn them as you read. The practice for list 2 is due Friday, September 15 by 22:59 for a participation grade.

See the newly revised Crime and Punishment essay assignment. I've specified and focused it some, while still allowing wide latitude of exact topic and approach. I hope I've guided you more clearly, not stifled your interest or creativity.

Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 3 and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here.

 

 

Tuesday

 

 

 

 

 

Crime and Punishment quiz Part 2 due in class today. Paper copy, following MLA guidelines for heading, intext citation, works cited. Use only Times New Roman font size 12. Upload to turnitin assignment QUIZ, Crime and Punishment Part 2.due by 15:30. See Essay submission on the policy page.

Crime and Punishment Part 1 chapters 3 & 4 discussion in class. Bring Crime and Punishment and Degen.

Be reading Crime and Punishment Parts 2 & 3 and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. And be sure your repeated element is concrete. See the Crime and Punishment essay assignment for details and examples. If you've not read that assignment—in full—then you've not done what you should have.

Is this why you go to college?

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

 

 

 

Vocab. quiz Crime and Punishment Part 2 today in class. Just kidding. We'll reschedule it for next week.

Crime and Punishment Part 1 discussion in class, if time allows. Hey, with no quiz, it will!

Be reading Crime and Punishment Parts 2 & 3 and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. See the Crime and Punishment essay assignment for details and examples. If you've not read that assignment—in full—then you've not done what you should have.

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

Crime and Punishment Part 1 chapters 5 & 6 discussion in class.

Be reading Crime and Punishment Parts 2 & 3 and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. See the Crime and Punishment essay assignment for details and examples. If you've not read that assignment—in full—then you've not done what you should have.

 

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

 

Crime and Punishment Part 1 chapter 7 discussion in class.

Be reading Crime and Punishment Parts 2 & 3 and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. See the Crime and Punishment essay assignment for details and examples. If you've not read that assignment—in full—then you've not done what you should have.

Body ¶ DRAFT due Monday by 15:30 to peergrade assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT. Follow MLA guidelines for heading, in-text citation, and works cited. (Use the MLA style center website here.) Use only Times New Roman font size 12. Remove your name from the draft. Draft upload, editing, and response all a participation grade.

Bring two paper copies of your draft with you to class on Monday.

Crime and Punishment
reading links

 

Character list

Chronology of Part 1 and map of Petersburg

Sample annotated opening pages

What C & P can teach you that the internet can't

Archbishop Rowan Williams on Dostoevsky

Raskolnikov's St. Petersburg, map of his travels

Articles on Crime and Punishment

Dostoevsky's empathy

Kenosis

Reverence by Paul Woodruff

Paul Woodruff talks to Bill Moyers

A few words about plot by Justin Cronin

 

 

For September 11
On the Transmigration of Souls
John Adams

 

 

Dostoevsky's characterization
Vladimir Nabokov

“Dostoyevsky characterizes his people through situation, through ethical matters, their psychological reactions, their inside ripples. After describing the looks of a character, he uses the old-fashioned device of not referring to his specific physical appearance anymore in the scenes with him. This is not the way of an artist—say Tolstoy—who sees his character in his mind all the time and knows exactly the specific gesture he will employ at this or that moment. But there is something more striking still about Dostoyevsky.”

 

 

On Dostoevsky
Charles Block

"So 10th grade, Crime and Punishment. After school, I started reading along with the class for the first time.
     "It got even weirder, because the pawnbroker Raskolnikov murders is a gruff woman. She reminded me a little of my mother. I think of my mom as a very kind person, but she never wanted to be a pawnbroker. She used to say, Don't tell people what we do. She always said, Tell people your parents are in sales. She didn't want people to judge us, I guess. In any case, she wasn't really suited for it. She was a nervous person who could get upset easily, and she didn't enjoy being down there. She could really not be easy with the customers.
     "So as Dostoyevsky presented this woman, who acts gruffly towards Raskolnikov and treats him with suspicion, it was not too hard to see the parallels—and that made me feel kind of sick. It was so much like what I knew. And in that familiar setting, the worst nightmare takes place. The murder is so clearly and so cleanly described.
     Dostoyevsky is fairly bloodless about this. There's no melodrama—it's very plain description. One thing that was strange to me, back then, was that we actually care about Raskolnikov. We want him to get away with murder. I could tell, even then, that the whole point of the book is that you want him to get away this, that you're rooting for him.
     "But how was I supposed to do that?
     "Other sections of the book also got to me—especially the fact that, after killing and robbing the woman, Raskolnikov returns home and goes to sleep. That, I understood: It's what I do all the time. When I was fifteen and had my learner's permit, I drove my dadÕs car into a wall. Afterwards, I went home and got in bed and tried to hide. It's what I still do, even now, after any failure or bad thing—when my teeth hurt, or I'm trying to figure something out, or I'm at an impasse in my work, one of the things I do is take a nap. I consider myself one of the world's great nappers. I'll set my alarm for ten minutes, and I'm not sure if I fall asleep or not, but I sit there thinking and relax.
     "To see that someone knew the human condition this deeply. I remember thinking, how does Dostoyevsky know I do this? It had a profound effect on me. The writer of this book had somehow created intimate connections between my life in Las Vegas and 19th-century Russia. I understood, for the first time, that there is a deeper truth going on in fiction. I don't think it changed my everyday malaise, or my lostness. That wasn't going to change for a long time. But, I do think some larger doors started to open—in my understanding of what people can know, of what literature might be."

 

 

Empthy versus sympathy

"In 1909, the psychologist Edward Titchener translated the German Einfhlung ('feeling into') into English as empathy. Empathy can be defined as a person's ability to recognize and share the emotions of another person, fictional character, or sentient being. It involves, first, seeing someone else's situation from his perspective, and, second, sharing his emotions, including, if any, his distress.
     "For me to share in someone else's perspective, I must do more than merely put myself into his position. Instead, I must imagine myself as him, and, more than that, imagine myself as him in the particular situation in which he finds himself. I cannot empathize with an abstract or detached feeling. To empathize with a particular person, I need to have at least some knowledge of who he is and what he is doing or trying to do. As John Steinbeck wrote, 'It means very little to know that a million Chinese are starving unless you know one Chinese who is starving.'
     "Empathy is often confused with pity, sympathy, and compassion, which are each reactions to the plight of others. Pity is a feeling of discomfort at the distress of one or more sentient beings, and often has paternalistic or condescending overtones. Implicit in the notion of pity is that its object does not deserve its plight, and, moreover, is unable to prevent, reverse, or overturn it. Pity is less engaged than empathy, sympathy, or compassion, amounting to little more than a conscious acknowledgement of the plight of its object."

Assignments due

Hiroshige,_Sudden_shower_over_Shin-œhashi_bridge_and_Atake,_1857

 

Tuesday, September 12. Quiz Crime and Punishment Part 2. I've asked you to begin reading with a purpose and to track a repeated element you find interesting and to collect evidence. The quiz will ask you to tell me about that something in Part 2 in ¶ form. Bring your ¶ response to class on Tuesday. Follow MLA guidelines for heading, in-text citation, works cited. Use only Times New Roman font size 12. Upload to turnitin assignment QUIZ, Crime and Punishment Part 2 due by 15:30. See Essay submission on the policy page.

Wednesday, September 20. Vocab. quiz Crime and Punishment Part 2.

Monday, September 18 by 8. Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT. Use the thesis you wrote—or an improved one—to develop a series of topic sentences. Choose one of those topic sentences and write one body ¶. Focus on the writing concepts we have studied: TS, E, P1, A1, A2, A3, T1, B1, B2, B3. Include your thesis above the body ¶ and remember to remove your name from the heading. You will upload this draft to peergrade assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT by 8am Friday. A participation grade counting upload, feedback, and responding to feedback.

Friday, September 22 by 15:30. Peergrade editing of Crime and Punishment body ¶.

Monday, September 25. Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL. Paper copy in class, upload to assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL at both peergrade and turnitin by 15:30. See Essay submission on the policy page for details. Follow MLA format for heading, citations, and works cited page; and use only Times New Roman font.

 

 

Two extra extra-credit opps
for September

1. Compose a metapor or simile for Harvey. Before you begin, read about metaphor and simile at poetryfoundation.org.

2. You probably shouldn't judge a book by its cover, but the cover should offer some clue about the book. Take a look at the cover of Crime and Punishment and explain its relevance to the novel. Put your analytical voice to work, using Levels 1, 2, and 3. See more book cover designs here.

Choose one, which you can do in addition to a movie or poem.

 

 

Crime and Punishment
reading schedule

Review the vocabulary list before reading.

And be noting your repeated element.

Due September 25: Parts 2 & 3, pages 89-278.
Due October 2: Part 4, pages 281-358.
Due October 9: Part 5, pages 361-436.
Due October 16: Part 6 & Epilogue, pages 439-551.

 

 

Crime and Punishment vocab lists

Crime and Punishment Part 1 list
Crime and Punishment Part 2 list
Crime and Punishment Part 3 list
Crime and Punishment Part 4 list
Crime and Punishment Part 5 list
Crime and Punishment Part 6, Epilogue list
zipgrade student ids

 

 

Essay documents

Grading notes

Essay editing marks, with explanations

See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight

LBH sentence crafting packet

LBH punctuation packet

Essay rubric, technical

Essay rubric, conceptual

Asking good questions

MLA style center

 

 

Crime and Punishment essay

One of the most frequent and telling patterns in literature is repetition. Repetition clues us into what the author wants us to notice, what he or she thinks matters. As you continue to read Crime and Punishment, note some repeated element. You might see a word (one associated with a character, say), an image, a character's repeated action or thought, a setting, an allusion, a theme. See the list on page 94 in Degen. But be creative here. You might, for instance, choose something off the beaten track, comparing how Dostoevsky describes his characters, for instance, or the hidden clues in clothing. Don't think you need to slavishly follow my suggestions or Degen's list. Be open to growth, my friends. His questions for each category, are fine, but don't be limited to them. He lists some questions for each category, but don't be limited to them. Follow your own thinking and interests. Let your interest drive your thinking and writing. Remember the questions I asked you to write last week? Read this about asking good questions. And remember that literature shows you human truth.

You will devise your own topic by choosing one repeated element you find interesting, and over time discovering an interesting and insightful way of thinking about the repeated element. You will then define a way of organizing the essay, perhaps from those found in option two on pages 95-103 in Degen.

As you read the novel, record telling evidence about your repeated element, and do so in some organized way—front/back of your book; on paper; a doc; or using post-it notes or colored tabs. Notice what the novel's showing you about your element, what questions it prompts you to ask, what answers it offers. On each note record the questions you ask or the relevance you see to your category and cross reference examples as you go. The more you read, the more you should begin to find interesting questions and to enrich and clarify your thinking.

Read and think thematically. Here's a good introduction to theme. You will eventually link your repeated element to theme.

The patterns you discover and the questions you ask will lead you to an interesting thesis.

We'll finalize your topic and thesis later, in conference.

For this and all writing assignments, do no Googling or other research. Reading other people's ideas gets in the way of your own and often sends them packing. Who knows what you would have thought? Develop your own thinking and writing, your own ability to create a point of view. That matters more than you know. Use nothing other than your book, your class notes, and your own mind.

August 28-September 1, the lost week of Harvey

Monday

 

 

 

 

 

No classes today.

Not since Hurricane Ike in 2008 has the school canceled a week of classes. That storm was bad, too, but not as bad as Harvey, maybe.

Here's what we would have covered this week, or most of it. I've not included the material about developing an analytical voice.

Note the change to Crime and Punishment writing. The revised essay is out. A body ¶ is in. The body ¶ is the building block of expository writing. Let's practice that. We'll study opening and closing ¶s later. Let's focus our learning.

Continue reading Crime and Punishment. We don't have time to wait, really. So we'll move ahead with Part 2 next week as planned.

The quiz over Part 2 still happens Tuesday, September 5.

The body ¶ DRAFT is due Friday, September 8, with the same expectations. See the assignment beneath Assignments due.

The body ¶ FINAL is due Monday, September 11. See the assignment beneath Assignments due. Make special note of the format requirements. Learn how to write the proper MLA citation at the MLA style center. See link beneath Essay documents in the middle column.

That said, it would be really helpful if you could read about ¶ writing on your own. We would have covered Degen chapter 3, pages 53-88, learning the editing symbols TS, E, P1, A1, A2, A3, T1; and B1, B2, B3 on pages 192-196.

That's a lot of information, but you're familiar with some of it already, and the concepts are pretty concrete. Learn the principles and practice using them as you draft your body ¶ DRAFT.

We'll cover the material, quickly I hope, when we return next week.

Just as I didn't follow everything Degen said about TH, I don't follow or even endorse everything he says about the new writing concepts. He likes fluffy, overblown writing in a way I and most college professors don't; and he favors a general way of thinking and writing that I and college professors don't. I want you to be specific, precise, and concrete, to think from evidence in a way Degen doesn't. I want you to show your thinking more fully and precisely than his models show.

But the writing 101 concepts he covers are solid and the stuff of good witing here and everywhere. Learn them and empower your writing. Forever.

Also begin reviewing and learning Crime and Punishment vocab. list 2, linked in the middle column under Crime and Punishment vocab lists. We'll have a quiz the week after next. You'd be smart to review the words and to learn them as you read. The practice for list 2 is due Friday, September 8 by 22:59 for a participation grade.

See the newly revised Crime and Punishment essay assignment. I've specified and focused it some, while still allowing wide latitude of exact topic and approach. I hope I've guided you more clearly, not stifled your interest or creativity.

Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 2 and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here.

 

 

Tuesday

 

 

 

 

 

No classes today.

Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 2 and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here.

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

 

 



No classes today.

Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 2 and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here.

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

No classes today.

Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 2 and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here.

 

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

 

No classes today.

Bring Crime and Punishment, Degen, and Trimble to class on Tuesday.

Crime and Punishment quiz Part 2 on Tuesday. You'll need your iPad.

Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 2 and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here.

Crime and Punishment
reading links

Character list

Chronology of Part 1 and map of Petersburg

Sample annotated opening pages

What C & P can teach you that the internet can't

Archbishop Rowan Williams on Dostoevsky

Raskolnikov's St. Petersburg, map of his travels

Articles on Crime and Punishment

Dostoevsky's empathy

Kenosis

 

 

Are humans natural-born killers?

"Our violence operates far outside the bounds of any other species. Human beings kill anything. Slaughter is a defining behavior of our species. We kill all other creatures, and we kill our own. Read today's paper. Read yesterday's, or read tomorrow's. The enormous industry of print and broadcast journalism serves predominantly to document our killing. Violence exists in the animal world, of course, but on a far different scale. Carnivores kill for food; we kill our family members, our children, our parents, our spouses, our brothers and sisters, our cousins and in-laws. We kill strangers. We kill people who are different from us, in appearance, beliefs, race, and social status. We kill ourselves in suicide. We kill for advantage and for revenge, we kill for entertainment: the Roman Coliseum, drive-by shootings, bullfights, hunting and fishing, animal roadkill in an instantaneous reflex for sport. We kill friends, rivals, coworkers, and classmates. Children kill children, in school and on the playground. Grandparents, parents, fathers, mothers—all kill and all of them are the targets of killing."

 

 

On Dostoevsky
Vladimir Nabokov

"In the light of the historical development of artistic vision, Dostoyevsky is a very fascinating phenomenon. If you examine closely any of his works, say ''The Brothers Karamazov,'' you will note that the natural background and all things relevant to the perception of the senses hardly exist. What landscape there is is a landscape of ideas, a moral landscape. The weather does not exist in his world, so it does not much matter how people dress. Dostoyevsky characterizes his people through situation, through ethical matters, their psychological reactions, their inside ripples. After describing the looks of a character, he uses the old-fashioned device of not referring to his specific physical appearance anymore in the scenes with him. This is not the way of an artist - say Tolstoy—who sees his character in his mind all the time and knows exactly the specific gesture he will employ at this or that moment. But there is something more striking still about Dostoyevsky. He seems to have been chosen by the destiny of Russian letters to become Russia's greatest playwright, but he took the wrong turning and wrote novels. The novel ''The Brothers Karamazov'' has always seemed to me a straggling play, with just that amount of furniture and other implements needed for the various actors: a round table with the wet, round trace of a glass, a window painted yellow to make it look as if there were sunlight outside, or a shrub hastily brought in and plumped down by a stagehand.
     "Let me refer to one more method of dealing with literature - and this is the simplest and perhaps most important one. If you hate a book, you still may derive artistic delight from imagining other and better ways of looking at things, or, what is the same, expressing things, than the author you hate does. The mediocre, the false, the poshlost* -can at least afford a mischievous but very healthy pleasure, as you stamp and groan through a second-rate book which has been awarded a prize. But the books you like must also be read with shudders and gasps. Let me submit the following practical suggestion. Literature, real literature, must not be gulped down like some potion which may be good for the heart or good for the brain - the brain, that stomach of the soul. Literature must be taken and broken to bits, pulled apart, squashed -then its lovely reek will be smelt in the hollow of the palm, it will be munched and rolled upon the tongue with relish; then, and only then, its rare flavor will be appreciated at its true worth and the broken and crushed parts will again come together in your mind and disclose the beauty of a unity to which you have contributed something of your own blood."

 

 

Empthy versus sympathy

"In 1909, the psychologist Edward Titchener translated the German Einfhlung ('feeling into') into English as empathy. Empathy can be defined as a person's ability to recognize and share the emotions of another person, fictional character, or sentient being. It involves, first, seeing someone else's situation from his perspective, and, second, sharing his emotions, including, if any, his distress.
     "For me to share in someone else's perspective, I must do more than merely put myself into his position. Instead, I must imagine myself as him, and, more than that, imagine myself as him in the particular situation in which he finds himself. I cannot empathize with an abstract or detached feeling. To empathize with a particular person, I need to have at least some knowledge of who he is and what he is doing or trying to do. As John Steinbeck wrote, 'It means very little to know that a million Chinese are starving unless you know one Chinese who is starving.'
     "Empathy is often confused with pity, sympathy, and compassion, which are each reactions to the plight of others. Pity is a feeling of discomfort at the distress of one or more sentient beings, and often has paternalistic or condescending overtones. Implicit in the notion of pity is that its object does not deserve its plight, and, moreover, is unable to prevent, reverse, or overturn it. Pity is less engaged than empathy, sympathy, or compassion, amounting to little more than a conscious acknowledgement of the plight of its object."

Assignments due

Hiroshige,_Sudden_shower_over_Shin-œhashi_bridge_and_Atake,_1857

 

Tuesday, September 5. Quiz Crime and Punishment Part 2. I've asked you to begin reading with a purpose and to track a repeated element you find interesting and to collect evidence. The quiz will ask you to tell me about that something in Part 2 in ¶ form. Have some evidence prepared and be ready to show me your thinking.

Friday, September 8 by 8 am. Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT. Use the thesis you wrote to develop a series of topic sentences. Choose one of those topic sentences and write one body ¶. Focus on the writing concepts we have studied: TS, E, P1, A1, A2, A3, T1, B1, B2, B3. Include your thesis above the body ¶. You will upload this draft to peergrade assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT by 8am Friday. A participation grade counting upload, feedback, and responding to feedback.

Friday, September 8 by 23:59. Completion of Crime and Punishment vocab. list 2 practice at vocabulary.com. A participation grade.

Monday, September 11. Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL. Paper copy in class, upload to assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL at both peergrade and turnitin by 15:30. See Essay submission on the policy page for details. Follow MLA format for heading, citations, and works cited page; and use only Times New Roman font.

 

 

Crime and Punishment essay

One of the most frequent and telling patterns in literature is repetition. Repetition clues us into what the author wants us to notice, what he or she thinks matters. As you continue to read Crime and Punishment, note some repeated element. You might see a word, an image, a character's repeated action or thought, a setting, an allusion, a theme. See the list on page 94 in Degen. He lists some questions for each category, but don't be limited to them. Follow your own thinking and interests. Let your interest drive your thinking and writing. Remember the questions I asked you to write last week? Read this about asking good questions. And remember that literature shows you human truth.

You will devise your own topic by choosing one repeated element you find interesting, and over time discovering an interesting and insightful way of thinking about the repeated element. You will then define a way of organizing the essay, perhaps from those found in option two on pages 95-103 in Degen.

As you read the novel, record telling evidence about your repeated element, and do so in some organized way—front/back of your book; on paper; a doc; or using post-it notes or colored tabs. Notice what the novel's showing you about your element, what questions it prompts you to ask, what answers it offers. On each note record the questions you ask or the relevance you see to your category and cross reference examples as you go. The more you read, the more you should begin to find interesting questions and to enrich and clarify your thinking.

Read and think thematically. Here's a good introduction to theme. You will eventually link your repeated element to theme.

The patterns you discover and the questions you ask will lead you to an interesting thesis.

We'll finalize your topic and thesis later, in conference.

For this and all writing assignments, do no Googling or other research. Develop your own thinking and writing, your own ability to create a point of view. Use nothing other than your book, your class notes, and your own mind.

 

 

Crime and Punishment
reading schedule

Due September 5: Part 2, pages 89-193: 105 pp, 21 days
Due September 11: Part 3, pages 197-278: 82 pp, 7 days
Due September 18: Part 4, pages 281-358: 78 pp, 7 days
Due September 25: Part 5, pages 361-436: 76 pp, 7 days
Due October 2: Part 6, pages 439-551: 113 pp, 7 days

 

 

Crime and Punishment vocab lists

Crime and Punishment Part 1 list
Crime and Punishment Part 2 list
zipgrade student ids

 

 

Essay documents

Grading notes

Essay editing marks, with explanations

See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight

LBH sentence crafting packet

LBH punctuation packet

Essay rubric, technical

Essay rubric, conceptual

Asking good questions

MLA style center

 

 

Biology of human behavior
Robert Sapolsky

August 21-25

Monday

 

 

 

 

 

Summer essay due to peergrade by 8 am. A participation grade.

If your name does not appear last name, first name at either peergrade or turnitin, fix that pronto.

Record your zipgrade student id.

Introduce Crime and Punishment essay.

Thesis sentences, how they work. Bring Degen and Crime and Punishment. Degen 94-103.

By the end of today you should know what a thesis is and how one is made and how Aristotle's topics can help you think about a topic and organize an essay.

For Thursday, revise your thesis sentence using your improving understanding and skills. Follow the "formula." The goal is not a perfect thesis but an improved one. You're learning how to do.

Always feel welcomed to come by my office for a conference. Here's my schedule, which is also posted under Office on the policy page.

 

 

Tuesday

 

 

 

 

 

Bring Degen and Crime and Punishment.

We'll continue learning about thesis sentences. Degen 224-25.

Study for vocab. quiz Crime and Punishment Part 1 tomorrow. Definitions and sentences.

Crime and Punishment final essay due September 5.

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

 

 



Vocab. quiz Crime and Punishment Part 1 today.

For Thursday, revise your thesis sentence after your improving understanding and skills. Follow the "formula." The goal is not a perfect thesis but an improved one. You're learning how to do.

That revised sentence due to peergrade assignment Crime and Punishment thesis for workshop by 8am Thursday. A participation grade.

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

Thesis workshop. Your revised Crime and Punishment thesis due to peergrade assignment Crime and Punishment thesis for workshop by 8am. A participation grade.

Your peergrade editing is due by Saturday 22:00. A participation grade.

Bring Degen and Crime and Punishment to class. You will use them.

 

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

 

Continued thesis workshop. By the end of class today you should have a vastly improved thesis and an improved understanding of what a thesis is, how it works, and how to craft one.

Your peergrade editing and comment evaluation are due by Saturday 22:00. Each a participation grade.

As you read the comments on your thesis, respond to them. Peergrade offers ways to have enriching conversations with your editors. Do. Flag comments as helpful, or not, and add feedback reaction. A participation grade.

Read these two posts on the peergrade website: Viewing your feedback and Feedback reaction.F

For Monday, read Degen 18-22 and Trimble (Writing with Style) chapter 2, pages 12-22. We'll begin devloping an analytical voice and review some getting started basics.

Bring Degen, Trimble, and Crime and Punishment to class.

Be reading Crime and Punishment.

Crime and Punishment
reading links

Character list

Chronology of Part 1 and map of Petersburg

Sample annotated opening pages

What C & P can teach you that the internet can't

Archbishop Rowan Williams on Dostoevsky

Raskolnikov's St. Petersburg, map of his travels

Articles on Crime and Punishment

Dostoevsky's empathy

Kenosis

 

 

Are humans natural-born killers?

"Our violence operates far outside the bounds of any other species. Human beings kill anything. Slaughter is a defining behavior of our species. We kill all other creatures, and we kill our own. Read today's paper. Read yesterday's, or read tomorrow's. The enormous industry of print and broadcast journalism serves predominantly to document our killing. Violence exists in the animal world, of course, but on a far different scale. Carnivores kill for food; we kill our family members, our children, our parents, our spouses, our brothers and sisters, our cousins and in-laws. We kill strangers. We kill people who are different from us, in appearance, beliefs, race, and social status. We kill ourselves in suicide. We kill for advantage and for revenge, we kill for entertainment: the Roman Coliseum, drive-by shootings, bullfights, hunting and fishing, animal roadkill in an instantaneous reflex for sport. We kill friends, rivals, coworkers, and classmates. Children kill children, in school and on the playground. Grandparents, parents, fathers, mothers—all kill and all of them are the targets of killing."

 

 

On Dostoevsky
Vladimir Nabokov

"In the light of the historical development of artistic vision, Dostoyevsky is a very fascinating phenomenon. If you examine closely any of his works, say ''The Brothers Karamazov,'' you will note that the natural background and all things relevant to the perception of the senses hardly exist. What landscape there is is a landscape of ideas, a moral landscape. The weather does not exist in his world, so it does not much matter how people dress. Dostoyevsky characterizes his people through situation, through ethical matters, their psychological reactions, their inside ripples. After describing the looks of a character, he uses the old-fashioned device of not referring to his specific physical appearance anymore in the scenes with him. This is not the way of an artist - say Tolstoy—who sees his character in his mind all the time and knows exactly the specific gesture he will employ at this or that moment. But there is something more striking still about Dostoyevsky. He seems to have been chosen by the destiny of Russian letters to become Russia's greatest playwright, but he took the wrong turning and wrote novels. The novel ''The Brothers Karamazov'' has always seemed to me a straggling play, with just that amount of furniture and other implements needed for the various actors: a round table with the wet, round trace of a glass, a window painted yellow to make it look as if there were sunlight outside, or a shrub hastily brought in and plumped down by a stagehand.
     "Let me refer to one more method of dealing with literature - and this is the simplest and perhaps most important one. If you hate a book, you still may derive artistic delight from imagining other and better ways of looking at things, or, what is the same, expressing things, than the author you hate does. The mediocre, the false, the poshlost* -can at least afford a mischievous but very healthy pleasure, as you stamp and groan through a second-rate book which has been awarded a prize. But the books you like must also be read with shudders and gasps. Let me submit the following practical suggestion. Literature, real literature, must not be gulped down like some potion which may be good for the heart or good for the brain - the brain, that stomach of the soul. Literature must be taken and broken to bits, pulled apart, squashed -then its lovely reek will be smelt in the hollow of the palm, it will be munched and rolled upon the tongue with relish; then, and only then, its rare flavor will be appreciated at its true worth and the broken and crushed parts will again come together in your mind and disclose the beauty of a unity to which you have contributed something of your own blood."

 

 

Empthy versus sympathy

"In 1909, the psychologist Edward Titchener translated the German Einfhlung ('feeling into') into English as empathy. Empathy can be defined as a person's ability to recognize and share the emotions of another person, fictional character, or sentient being. It involves, first, seeing someone else's situation from his perspective, and, second, sharing his emotions, including, if any, his distress.
     "For me to share in someone else's perspective, I must do more than merely put myself into his position. Instead, I must imagine myself as him, and, more than that, imagine myself as him in the particular situation in which he finds himself. I cannot empathize with an abstract or detached feeling. To empathize with a particular person, I need to have at least some knowledge of who he is and what he is doing or trying to do. As John Steinbeck wrote, 'It means very little to know that a million Chinese are starving unless you know one Chinese who is starving.'
     "Empathy is often confused with pity, sympathy, and compassion, which are each reactions to the plight of others. Pity is a feeling of discomfort at the distress of one or more sentient beings, and often has paternalistic or condescending overtones. Implicit in the notion of pity is that its object does not deserve its plight, and, moreover, is unable to prevent, reverse, or overturn it. Pity is less engaged than empathy, sympathy, or compassion, amounting to little more than a conscious acknowledgement of the plight of its object."

Assignments due

Thursday, August 24 by 8am. Your revised thesis sentence uploaded to peergrade assignment Crime and Punishment thesis for workshop. A participation grade. Peergrade hand-in closes at 8am. Remove your name from the doc.

Saturday, August 26 by 22:00. Peergrade thesis editing and comment evaluation. Each a participation grade.

Wednesday, August 23. Vocab. quiz 1 Crime and Punishment vocab. list Part 1. Definitions and sentences from the novel.

Tuesday, September 5. Quiz Crime and Punishment Part 2. I've asked you to begin reading with a purpose and track something you find interesting and to collect evidence. The quiz will ask you to tell me about that something in Part 2 in ¶ form. Have some evidence prepared and be ready to show me your thinking.

Wednesday, September 6. Crime and Punishment summer essay final version. Focus on thesis writing (TH); making analytical associations from evidence and developing evidence (LTR); and blending evidence (B). Follow MLA format, heading, citation, and works cited; and use only Times New Roman font size 12. Upload to turnitin assignment Crime and Punishment summer essay final version due by 8am Tuesday. Paper copy in class. Paper copy is the copy of record. See Essay submission on the policy page.

 

 

Crime and Punishment essay

One of the most frequent and telling patterns in literature is repetition. Repetition clues us into what the author wants us to notice, what he or she thinks matters. As you continue to read Crime and Punishment, note some repeating element. You might see a word, an image, a character's repeated action or thought, a setting, an allusion, a theme. See the list on page 94 in Degen. He lists some questions for each category, but don't be limited to them. Follow your own thinking and interests. Let your interest drive your thinking and writing. Remember the questions I asked you to write last week? Read this about asking good questions.

You will devise your own topic by choosing one repeated element you find interesting, and over time discovering an interesting and insightful way of thinking about the repeated element. You will then define a way of organizing the essay, perhaps from those found in option two on pages 95-103 in Degen.

As you read the novel, record telling evidence about your repeated element, and do so in some organized way—front/back of your book; on paper; a doc; or using post-it notes or colored tabs. Notice what the novel's showing you about your element, what questions it prompts you to ask, what answers it offers. On each note record the questions you ask or the relevance you see to your category and cross reference examples as you go. The more you read, the more you should begin to find interesting questions and to enrich and clarify your thinking.

Read and think thematically. Here's a good introduction to theme. You will eventually link your repeated element to theme.

The patterns you discover and the questions you ask will lead you to an interesting thesis

We'll finalize your topic and thesis later, in conference.

For this and all writing assignments, do no Googling or other research. Develop your own thinking and writing, your own ability to create a point of view. Use nothing other than your book, your class notes, and your own mind.

 

 

Crime and Punishment
reading schedule

Due September 5: Part 2, pages 89-193: 105 pp, 21 days
Due September 11: Part 3, pages 197-278: 82 pp, 7 days
Due September 18: Part 4, pages 281-358: 78 pp, 7 days
Due September 25: Part 5, pages 361-436: 76 pp, 7 days
Due October 2: Part 6, pages 439-551: 113 pp, 7 days

 

 

Crime and Punishment vocab lists

Crime and Punishment Part 1 list
Crime and Punishment Part 2 list
zipgrade student ids

 

 

The books you need now

 

 

Essay documents

Grading notes

Essay editing marks, with explanations

See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight

LBH sentence crafting packet

LBH punctuation packet

Essay rubric, technical

Essay rubric, conceptual

Asking good questions

MLA style center

 

 

Dostoevsky biography
from The School of Life

August 16-18

Monday

 

 

 

 

 

No classes.

 

 

Tuesday

 

 

 

 

 

No classes.

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

 

 



Hello and welcome.

Signup for turnitin.com AP Lit. 2018 Class id 15830844, enrollment key: jesuit. Use your last name, first name and ONLY your mail.strakejesuit email.

Sign up for AP Lit. 2018 course at peergrade. Use this course code: A2RP2R. Use your last name, first name and ONLY your mail.strakejesuit email.

Sign up for your section of vocabulary.com

AP Lit. 01

AP Lit. 02

AP Lit. 06

Make sure you have Google Drive, Google Docs, Google Spreadsheets, Google Chrome, and Socrative student installed on your iPad.

Scroll through the website to familiarize yourself with its offerings.

Read the policy page in full and in detail to learn my guiding rules.

Have Degen ready to go for Monday.

Summer worksheets due tomorrow. Bring them to class, along with your copy of Crime and Punishment. One change: you have written a thesis, yes; but now I want you also to write the question your thesis tries to answer. Write that question in the box with your thesis.

Print, read, and annotate this article by Chinua Achebe about why we read literature. It's one of the best statements I know.

And print, read, and annotate this article by David Mikics.

Of those articles, the Achebe is by far the more important.

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

Website review, policy conclusion.

Why you should read literature. Achebe article, Mikics article. Bring your annotated copies and your annotated copy of Crime and Punishment.

I will often check your annotations of reading for quiz grades.

Summer reading worksheets due. I'll check your annotations in Crime and Punishment.

We continue/begin our discussion of Crime and Punishment and our learning how to read more deeply.

 

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

 

And so we begin Crime and Punishment.

You'll need Degen over the weekend. We'll begin learning some ways literature makes meaning. Bring Degen to class on Monday. We'll talk thesis, then do some thesis workshop.

Read summer reading thesis statements grading notes. Follow grading notes link beneath Essay documents in the middle column.

Upload of your summer essay due to peergrade assignment Crime and Punishment summer essay by 8 am. Upload your essay as a pdf and remove your name from the MLA heading. Miss this deadline and lose ten ponts of credit. See Essay submission on the policy page.

Have Trimble, Writing with Style ready to go next week, too.

Are you keeping up with Crime and Punishment?

Crime and Punishment
reading links

Character list

Chronology of Part 1 and map of Petersburg

Sample annotated opening pages

What C & P can teach you that the internet can't

Archbishop Rowan Williams on Dostoevsky

Raskolnikov's St. Petersburg, map of his travels

Articles on Crime and Punishment

Dostoevsky's empathy

Kenosis

 

 

You are the product
John Lanchester

"Girard was a Christian, and his view of human nature is that it is fallen. We don't know what we want or who we are; we dont really have values and beliefs of our own; what we have instead is an instinct to copy and compare. We are homo mimeticus. 'Man is the creature who does not know what to desire, and who turns to others in order to make up his mind. We desire what others desire because we imitate their desires.' Look around, ye petty, and compare. The reason Thiel latched onto Facebook with such alacrity was that he saw in it for the first time a business that was Girardian to its core: built on people's deep need to copy.' Facebook first spread by word of mouth, and it's about word of mouth, so it's doubly mimetic,' Thiel said. 'Social media proved to be more important than it looked, because its about our natures.' We are keen to be seen as we want to be seen, and Facebook is the most popular tool humanity has ever had with which to do that.
     "The view of human nature implied by these ideas is pretty dark. If all people want to do is go and look at other people so that they can compare themselves to them and copy what they want—if that is the final, deepest truth about humanity and its motivations—then Facebook doesn't really have to take too much trouble over humanity's welfare, since all the bad things that happen to us are things we are doing to ourselves. For all the corporate uplift of its mission statement, Facebook is a company whose essential premise is misanthropic. It is perhaps for that reason that Facebook, more than any other company of its size, has a thread of malignity running through its story. The high-profile, tabloid version of this has come in the form of incidents such as the live-streaming of rapes, suicides, murders and cop-killings. But this is one of the areas where Facebook seems to me relatively blameless. People live-stream these terrible things over the site because it has the biggest audience; if Snapchat or Periscope were bigger, they'd be doing it there instead."
                                                                     full article here

 

 

 

 

Why novels and not movies
A Soviet film version of
Crime and Punishment

Assignments due

Thursday, August 17. Summer reading thesis/quote worksheet due in class. See late work in the policy page.

Monday, August 21 by 8 am. Upload of summer reading essay due to peergrade assignment Crime and Punishment summer essay. Upload the essay as a pdf and remove your name from the MLA heading. Miss this deadline and lose ten points of credit. See Essay submission on the policy page. Follow the listed format guidelines.

Vocabulary quizzes will be a little different from previous years: we will no longer use a vocabulary book and there is no longer a regularly scheduled vocabulary quiz. Instead I will be selecting words periodically from the texts we read that I think you need to know to be a part of civilization and that will enhance your understanding of, say, a character in one of the texts we're reading. So vocabulary, if we do it right, will seem less contrived this year, and—here's the important part—some of the words might actually stick.

Wednesday, August 23. Vocab. quiz 1 Crime and Punishment vocab. list Part 1.

 

 

Crime and Punishment
reading schedule

Due September 5: Part 2, pages 89-193: 105 pp, 21 days
Due September 11: Part 3, pages 197-278: 82 pp, 7 days
Due September 18: Part 4, pages 281-358: 78 pp, 7 days
Due September 25: Part 5, pages 361-436: 76 pp, 7 days
Due October 2: Part 6, pages 439-551: 113 pp, 7 days

 

 

The books you need now

 

 

Essay documents

Grading notes

Essay editing marks, with explanations

See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight

LBH sentence crafting packet

LBH punctuation packet

Essay rubric, technical

Essay rubric, conceptual

Asking good questions

MLA style center

 

 

Why creativity demands uncertainty

 


How We Experience the Meaning
We Create

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Why novels and not the internet?
David Mikics

"Novels deliver the unlike, the alien, as an antidote to our comforts and our day-to-day prejudices. Increasingly, we are snugly wrapped in our worldviews. Conservatives see everything in blue, progressives in red. The internet seems designed to back up our opinions, because when we're online we make a habit of seeking out the like-minded. We gang up on those we disagree with, rather than listening carefully to contrary opinions. When the web shows us the horrors of war and domestic violence, we take a quick look and move on. Distracted by snapshots of horror, we think we are following terrible events. But we're not, because we don't commit ourselves to finding out about the human actors behind them. Reading a novel means committing yourself, to the author and the characters. Glancing at evil and tragedy, as the internet encourages us to do, lets us avoid the hard questions about motivation and human personality that novels make us confront. " full article here