English 4 spring archive

April 16-20

Weekly calendar

 

Monday

tolstoy14 

 

 


 

Today. Othello 3.4-4.1.1-88.

 

Tonight. No new reading. Focus on your essay.

 

Ongoing. Friday, April 20 by 15:30. Full draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-20-18, Spring final essay DRAFT.

 

 

Tuesday

chekov14 

 

 


 

Today. Othello through Act 3.

 

Tonight. No new reading. Focus on your essay. Wednesday and Thursday, you will work on the essay in class. Tomorrow and Thursday you will work on your essay in class. Best to use your school-issued iPad to do that.
 

Ongoing. Friday, April 20 by 15:30. Full draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-20-18, Spring final essay DRAFT.

 

 

Wednesday

chinuaachebecolor14 

 

 

 

 

Today. Essay work in class. Best to use your school-issued iPad.

 

Tonight. No new reading. Focus on your essay.

 

Ongoing. Friday, April 20 by 15:30. Full draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-20-18, Spring final essay DRAFT.

 

 

Thursday

neruda14 

 

 

 

 

Today. Essay work in class. Best to use your school-issued iPad.

 

Tonight. Nothing new. Essay draft due tomorrow by 15:30.

 

Ongoing. Friday, April 20 by 15:30. Full draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-20-18, Spring final essay DRAFT.

 

 

Friday

wislawasymborska14 

 

 

 

 

Today. Field Day. No classes.

By 15:30. Full draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-20-18, Spring final essay DRAFT.

 

Tonight.

 

Ongoing.

Othello
reading links

othelloproductionimages2015iagoandothello2015photobykeithpattisoncrsc163878f1475e8c06724f44b8b73494ed2f9bdctmbimg4

Scene-by-scene summary
Othello, introduction from RSC
Notebook questions from Cambridge
Shakespeare's language from RSC
Selections from The Prince
Selections from The Book of The Courtier
Playing Othello, Hugh Quarshie

 

 

Othello, a racist play?

 

 

Shakespeare's language
shared lines

 

 

OTHELLO AS TRAGEDY
by William Hazlitt

pxWilliamHazlittselfportrait4 "It has been said that tragedy purifies the affections by terror and pity. That is, it substitutes imaginary sympathy for mere selfishness. It gives us a high and permanent interest, beyond ourselves, in humanity as such. It raises the great, the remote, and the possible to an equality with the real, the little and the near. It makes man a partaker with his kind. It subdues and softens the stubbornness of his will. It teaches him that there are and have been others like himself, by showing him as in a glass what they have felt, thought, and done. It opens the chambers of the human heart. It leaves nothing indifferent to us that can affect our common nature. It excites our sensibility by exhibiting the passions wound up to the utmost pitch by the power of imagination or the temptation of circumstances; and corrects their fatal excesses in ourselves by pointing to the greater extent of sufferings and of crimes to which they have led others. Tragedy creates a balance of the affections. It makes us thoughtful spectators in the lists of life. It is the refiner of the species; a discipline of humanity. The habitual study of poetry and works of imagination is one chief part of a well-grounded education. A taste for liberal art is necessary to complete the character of a gentleman, Science alone is hard and mechanical. It exercises the understanding upon things out of ourselves, while it leaves the affections unemployed, or engrossed with our own immediate, narrow interests.—OTHELLO furnishes an illustration of these remarks. It excites our sympathy in an extraordinary degree. The moral it conveys has a closer application to the concerns of human life than that of any other of Shakespeare's plays. 'It comes directly home to the bosoms and business of men.'"

 

 

An Actor's 10 key questions

alancummingacting7

1. Who am I?
2. Where am I?
3. When is it?
4. Where have I just come from?
5. What do I want?
6. Why do I want it?
7. Why do I want it now?
8. What will happen if I don't get it now?
9. How will I get what I want by doing what?
10. What must I overcome? (full article here)

Assignments due
read them in full

stephenkingworking14

 

Final essay/exam. See details here.

 

Friday, April 20 by 15:30. Full draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-20-18, Spring final essay DRAFT. This draft is 25% of the spring final essay grade. Think of this draft as the essay you would normally turn in. Think of it as a final draft.

 

Friday, May 4 by 15:30. Final draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 5-4-18, Spring final essay FINAL. This final draft is 75% of the spring final essay grade. The spring final essay, begin your final exam, is worth 20% of your spring semester grade.
 

 

Extra- extra-credit

othellorsc3 

Choose a small section of Othello, no longer than three minutes in performance. Perform it for the class, complete with blocking. Let the classroom be your stage.

 

 

 

Writing documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
LBH sentences crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Comma usage quick guide
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center

 

 

 

Shakespeare's language
prose and verse

 

 

Shakespeare's language
iambic pentameter

 

 

Shakespeare's language
exploring a soliloquy

 

 

April 9-13

Weekly calendar

 

Monday

tolstoy13 

 

 


 

Today. Othello 3.3.174-259.

 

Tonight. Read Othello 3.3.261-321 [Exit Emilia}, page 301. I want you very carefully to read Othello's soliloquy. We've talked about the balance of reason and passion in Othello, noting especially the brawl in 2.3 and the beginnings of Iago's manipulation. What is that balance in Othello in this speech? Where is Othello in his belief in Desdemona? Pay attention to punctuation, sounds, line endings in the speech.

If you've not been reading the play on your own, you've made a mistake. Repair it now. Begin by using the scene-by-scene summary linked beneath Othello reading links in right column. Or better yet, rent the RSC 2015 production of Othello here.

 

Ongoing. Friday, April 20 by 15:30. Full draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-20-18, Spring final essay DRAFT.

 

 

Tuesday

chekov13 

 

 


 

Today. Othello 3.3.261-321.

Spring final essay/exam DRAFT now due Friday, April 20.

 

Tonight. Read Othello 3.3.322-479, end of 3.3, page 312. Othello once again takes a long but quick emotional and intellectual journey. How do you understand why Othello believes Iago? Prepare some thinking with examples.
 

Ongoing. Friday, April 20 by 15:30. Full draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-20-18, Spring final essay DRAFT.

 

 

Wednesday

chinuaachebecolor13 

 

 

 

 

Today. Othello 3.3.261-479, end of 3.3.

 

Tonight. Read Othello 3.4, pages 313-324. What conflicts to you see in Othello? What proof does he gain of Desdemona's infidelity? How strong is that proof? (Hint: what does it consist of, really?) Is Othello seeing/understanding clearly? How are you feeling about Othello now? Does your view of Cassio change at all?

 

Ongoing. Friday, April 20 by 15:30. Full draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-20-18, Spring final essay DRAFT.

 

 

Thursday

neruda13 

 

 

 

 

Today. Othello 3.4.

 

Tonight. No new assigned reading, though you should be well toward the end of the play. Tomorrow we'll review some basics for the draft essay.

You might read this essay about Iago. We'll look at it tomorrow as an example non-5-¶ essay (link here).

 

Ongoing. Friday, April 20 by 15:30. Full draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-20-18, Spring final essay DRAFT.

 

 

Friday

wislawasymborska13 

 

 

 

 

Today. MLA poetry basics. Refresher on importance of essay focus; ¶ hooks; ¶ structure and developing ideas; how to elaborate quotations. Sample non-5-¶ essay.

 

Tonight. Read Othello 3.4-4.1.1-88, page 330. Iago sets up proof for Othello.

 

Ongoing. Friday, April 20 by 15:30. Full draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-20-18, Spring final essay DRAFT.
 

Othello
reading links

othelloproductionimages2015iagoandothello2015photobykeithpattisoncrsc163878f1475e8c06724f44b8b73494ed2f9bdctmbimg3

Scene-by-scene summary
Othello, introduction from RSC
Notebook questions from Cambridge
Shakespeare's language from RSC
Selections from The Prince
Selections from The Book of The Courtier
Playing Othello, Hugh Quarshie

 

 

Othello, a racist play?

 

 

Shakespeare's language
shared lines

 

 

OTHELLO AS TRAGEDY
by William Hazlitt

pxWilliamHazlittselfportrait3 "It has been said that tragedy purifies the affections by terror and pity. That is, it substitutes imaginary sympathy for mere selfishness. It gives us a high and permanent interest, beyond ourselves, in humanity as such. It raises the great, the remote, and the possible to an equality with the real, the little and the near. It makes man a partaker with his kind. It subdues and softens the stubbornness of his will. It teaches him that there are and have been others like himself, by showing him as in a glass what they have felt, thought, and done. It opens the chambers of the human heart. It leaves nothing indifferent to us that can affect our common nature. It excites our sensibility by exhibiting the passions wound up to the utmost pitch by the power of imagination or the temptation of circumstances; and corrects their fatal excesses in ourselves by pointing to the greater extent of sufferings and of crimes to which they have led others. Tragedy creates a balance of the affections. It makes us thoughtful spectators in the lists of life. It is the refiner of the species; a discipline of humanity. The habitual study of poetry and works of imagination is one chief part of a well-grounded education. A taste for liberal art is necessary to complete the character of a gentleman, Science alone is hard and mechanical. It exercises the understanding upon things out of ourselves, while it leaves the affections unemployed, or engrossed with our own immediate, narrow interests.—OTHELLO furnishes an illustration of these remarks. It excites our sympathy in an extraordinary degree. The moral it conveys has a closer application to the concerns of human life than that of any other of Shakespeare's plays. 'It comes directly home to the bosoms and business of men.'"

 

 

An Actor's 10 key questions

alancummingacting6

1. Who am I?
2. Where am I?
3. When is it?
4. Where have I just come from?
5. What do I want?
6. Why do I want it?
7. Why do I want it now?
8. What will happen if I don't get it now?
9. How will I get what I want by doing what?
10. What must I overcome? (full article here)

 

 

Honesy, Dan Ariely

Assignments due
read them in full

stephenkingworking13

 

Friday, April 27. Final essay/exam. See details here.

 

Friday, April 20 by 15:30. Full draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-20-18, Spring final essay DRAFT. This draft is 25% of the spring final essay grade. Think of this draft as the essay you would normally turn in. Think of it as a final draft.

 

Friday, May 4 by 15:30. Final draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 5-4-18, Spring final essay FINAL. This final draft is 75% of the spring final essay grade. The spring final essay, begin your final exam, is worth 20% of your spring semester grade.
 

 

Extra- extra-credit

othellorsc2 

Choose a small section of Othello, no longer than three minutes in performance. Perform it for the class, complete with blocking. Let the classroom be your stage.

 

 

 

Come see The Foreigner
yet another extra- extra-credit

untitled1

 

 

Writing documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
LBH sentences crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Comma usage quick guide
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center

 

 

 

Shakespeare's language
prose and verse

 

 

Shakespeare's language
iambic pentameter

 

 

Shakespeare's language
exploring a soliloquy

 

 

April 2-6

Weekly calendar

 

Monday

tolstoy12 

 

 


 

Today. No Classes.

Tonight.

Ongoing.

 

 

Tuesday

chekov12 

 

 


 

Today. Othello 2.1.
     With the first draft of the final exam essay due April 16, now's the time you want to start reading/watching the remainder of the play at your own pace, so that you have finished it before April 13.
     Watching with your book in hand, or listening to an audio version with your book in hand are helpful methods.
     Here's an audio version from Donmar Warehouse (link here). Here's a link to the RSC production from 2015 we've seen in class (link here). Using one or both makes for enjoyable and profitable study.

 

Tonight.     **Since we will not have class today, in your notebook, prepare responses to these questions for a quiz grade check tomorrow. **

    Questions for 2.1
     1) The storm is genius. Explain. Think drama and theme.
     2) More views on Othello in lines 1-59. Make a list of references to Othello in this scene. Decide whether each is positive or negative. Are the comments about Othello's professional or personal attributes?
     3) Cassio's descriptions of Desdemona. Pick out four of Cassio's descriptions of Desdemona from the script. Write them down. Comment on the kind of language used (such as exaggeration/hyperbole or comparison, metaphor, etc.) and the effect you think it has. What does Cassio think of Desdemona?
    4) Iago has had some choice roasts for Cassio. What's your impresssion of him? Find lines to support your view.

Read Othello 2.2-2.3. 2.3 is a big scene advancing Iago's plan for Cassio.
     Questions for 2.2-2.3.
     1) How does Iago bring his plan to fruition? Why are Iago's "plans" so successful? Why do they work so well? Look carefully at his interactions with Cassio, Roderigo, and Othello.
     2) What new do we see in Othello's character? Any connection to tragedy?  
     3) Characterize Othello and Desdemona's relationship in 2.1-3. Find a few lines to support your view. What does Shakespaere want us to see?     
 

Ongoing. Monday, April 16 by 15:30 Full draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-16-18, Spring final essay DRAFT. This draft is 25% of the spring final essay grade.

 

 

Wednesday

chinuaachebecolor12 

 

 

 

 

Today. Othello 2.2-2.3, end of Act 2.

 

Tonight. Read Othello 3.1-3.2. Two short scenes to advance the plot. Now begin one of the greatest scenes in drama. Read 3.3.1-89 [Exeunt Desdemona and Emilia].

 

Ongoing. Monday, April 16 by 15:30 Full draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-16-18, Spring final essay DRAFT. This draft is 25% of the spring final essay grade.

 

 

Thursday

neruda12 

 

 

 

 

Today. Othello 3.1-3.2, 3.3.1-89.

 

Tonight. Read Othello 3.3.90-173. Stop after Othello's line "O misery!" Pay attention to how Iago works on Othello. Who is to blame? Iago? Othello? Trace Othello very carefully through this scene. How does he change and why? Where does the fault lie?

 

Ongoing. Monday, April 16 by 15:30 Full draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-16-18, Spring final essay DRAFT. This draft is 25% of the spring final essay grade.

 

 

Friday

wislawasymborska12 

 

 

 

 

Today. Othello 3.3.90-173.

 

Tonight. Read Othello 3.3.174-259. Stop after Iago's line "I once more take my leave." [Exit]

 

Ongoing. Monday, April 16 by 15:30 Full draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-16-18, Spring final essay DRAFT. This draft is 25% of the spring final essay grade. .
 

Othello
reading links

othelloproductionimages2015iagoandothello2015photobykeithpattisoncrsc163878f1475e8c06724f44b8b73494ed2f9bdctmbimg2

Scene-by-scene summary
Othello, introduction from RSC
Notebook questions from Cambridge
Shakespeare's language from RSC
Selections from The Prince
Selections from The Book of The Courtier
Playing Othello, Hugh Quarshie

 

 

Othello, a racist play?

 

 

Shakespeare's language
shared lines

 

 

OTHELLO AS TRAGEDY
by William Hazlitt

pxWilliamHazlittselfportrait2 "It has been said that tragedy purifies the affections by terror and pity. That is, it substitutes imaginary sympathy for mere selfishness. It gives us a high and permanent interest, beyond ourselves, in humanity as such. It raises the great, the remote, and the possible to an equality with the real, the little and the near. It makes man a partaker with his kind. It subdues and softens the stubbornness of his will. It teaches him that there are and have been others like himself, by showing him as in a glass what they have felt, thought, and done. It opens the chambers of the human heart. It leaves nothing indifferent to us that can affect our common nature. It excites our sensibility by exhibiting the passions wound up to the utmost pitch by the power of imagination or the temptation of circumstances; and corrects their fatal excesses in ourselves by pointing to the greater extent of sufferings and of crimes to which they have led others. Tragedy creates a balance of the affections. It makes us thoughtful spectators in the lists of life. It is the refiner of the species; a discipline of humanity. The habitual study of poetry and works of imagination is one chief part of a well-grounded education. A taste for liberal art is necessary to complete the character of a gentleman, Science alone is hard and mechanical. It exercises the understanding upon things out of ourselves, while it leaves the affections unemployed, or engrossed with our own immediate, narrow interests.—OTHELLO furnishes an illustration of these remarks. It excites our sympathy in an extraordinary degree. The moral it conveys has a closer application to the concerns of human life than that of any other of Shakespeare's plays. 'It comes directly home to the bosoms and business of men.'"

 

 

An Actor's 10 key questions

alancummingacting5

1. Who am I?
2. Where am I?
3. When is it?
4. Where have I just come from?
5. What do I want?
6. Why do I want it?
7. Why do I want it now?
8. What will happen if I don't get it now?
9. How will I get what I want by doing what?
10. What must I overcome? (full article here)

 

 

The crisis in manhood

Assignments due
read them in full

stephenkingworking12

 

Friday, April 27. Final essay/exam. See details here.

 

Monday, April 16 by 15:30 Full draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-16-18, Spring final essay DRAFT. This draft is 25% of the spring final essay grade. Think of this draft as the essay you would normally turn in. Think of it as a final draft.

 

Friday, May 4 by 15:30. Final draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 5-4-18, Spring final essay FINAL. This final draft is 75% of the spring final essay grade. The spring final essay, begin your final exam, is worth 20% of your spring semester grade.
 

 

Extra- extra-credit

othellorsc1 

Choose a small section of Othello, no longer than three minutes in performance. Perform it for the class, complete with blocking. Let the classroom be your stage.

 

 

 

Come see The Foreigner
yet another extra- extra-credit

untitled

 

 

Writing documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
LBH sentences crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Comma usage quick guide
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center

 

 

 

Shakespeare's language
prose and verse

 

 

Shakespeare's language
iambic pentameter

 

 

Shakespeare's language
exploring a soliloquy

 

 

March 26-30

Weekly calendar

 

Monday

tolstoy11 

 

 


 

Today. A Doll's House in-class essay posted at 9:00 today. Print yours with bubbles and comments. You are to write out the bubble comments above the bubbles for a 100-point participation grade. Due Thursday.

Iago's soliloquy, end of Act 1. Reading a soliloquy.

Ongoing. Thursday, March 29 in class. A Doll's House essay with bubble comments written out. 100-point participation grade.

Monday, April 16 by 15:30 Full draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-16-18, Spring final essay DRAFT. This draft is 25% of the spring final essay grade.

 

 

Tuesday

chekov11 

 

 


 

Today. Iago's soliloquy, end of Act 1.

Tonight. Print, read, and annotate this document about tragedy (link here).
     In tragedy, the protagonist falls from happiness into misery.     
     1) How is Othello happy in Act 1 and why? Find some evidence.
     2) Do you see anything about Othello himself to indicate hubris? Has he made a hamartia mistake (link to definition here)?      3) What if anything might make his fall inevitable?
     4) How has Act 1 set up Othello's fall? What will be the cause that fall? Othello's character? Outside forces? His marriage?
     5)  How is Othello a character fit for tragedy? Aristotle says the tragic figure must be neither too good nor too wicked.

Prepare responses, with evidence for discussion. I will check yours for a quiz grade.

Ongoing. Thursday, March 29 in class. A Doll's House essay with bubble comments written out. 100-point participation grade.

Monday, April 16 by 15:30 Full draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-16-18, Spring final essay DRAFT. This draft is 25% of the spring final essay grade.

 

 

Wednesday

chinuaachebecolor11 

 

 

 

 

Today. Othello in Act 1. Tragedy. Some key concepts, vocabulary, definitions.

Tonight. No new reading.

Ongoing. Thursday, March 29 in class. A Doll's House essay with bubble comments written out. 100-point participation grade.

Monday, April 16 by 15:30 Full draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-16-18, Spring final essay DRAFT. This draft is 25% of the spring final essay grade.

 

 

Thursday

neruda11 

 

 

 

 

Today. Othello in Act 1. Tragedy. Some key concepts, vocabulary, definitions.

A Doll's House essay with bubble comments written out due in class. A 100-point partcipation grade.

Tonight. For Tuesday, read Othello 2.1. What do we learn about Othello and Desdemona's relationship? Think tragedy. What does this small section suggest about Othello's tragic fall? What might precipitate that fall? Find some key lines. How does Shakespeare use the storm, the new setting on Cyprus? How does the scene continue to reveal Iago to us? Once again, the scene ends with Iago's soliloquy. What are his thoughts?

Ongoing. Monday, April 16 by 15:30 Full draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-16-18, Spring final essay DRAFT. This draft is 25% of the spring final essay grade.

 

 

Friday

wislawasymborska11 

 

 

 

 

Today. No classes. Good Friday.

Tonight.

Ongoing. Monday, April 16 by 15:30 Full draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-16-18, Spring final essay DRAFT. This draft is 25% of the spring final essay grade.
 

Othello
reading links

othelloproductionimages2015iagoandothello2015photobykeithpattisoncrsc163878f1475e8c06724f44b8b73494ed2f9bdctmbimg1

Scene-by-scene summary
Othello, introduction from RSC
Notebook questions from Cambridge
Shakespeare's language from RSC
Selections from The Prince
Selections from The Book of The Courtier
Playing Othello, Hugh Quarshie

 

 

Othello, a racist play?

 

 

Shakespeare's language
shared lines

 

 

OTHELLO AS TRAGEDY
by William Hazlitt

pxWilliamHazlittselfportrait1 "It has been said that tragedy purifies the affections by terror and pity. That is, it substitutes imaginary sympathy for mere selfishness. It gives us a high and permanent interest, beyond ourselves, in humanity as such. It raises the great, the remote, and the possible to an equality with the real, the little and the near. It makes man a partaker with his kind. It subdues and softens the stubbornness of his will. It teaches him that there are and have been others like himself, by showing him as in a glass what they have felt, thought, and done. It opens the chambers of the human heart. It leaves nothing indifferent to us that can affect our common nature. It excites our sensibility by exhibiting the passions wound up to the utmost pitch by the power of imagination or the temptation of circumstances; and corrects their fatal excesses in ourselves by pointing to the greater extent of sufferings and of crimes to which they have led others. Tragedy creates a balance of the affections. It makes us thoughtful spectators in the lists of life. It is the refiner of the species; a discipline of humanity. The habitual study of poetry and works of imagination is one chief part of a well-grounded education. A taste for liberal art is necessary to complete the character of a gentleman, Science alone is hard and mechanical. It exercises the understanding upon things out of ourselves, while it leaves the affections unemployed, or engrossed with our own immediate, narrow interests.—OTHELLO furnishes an illustration of these remarks. It excites our sympathy in an extraordinary degree. The moral it conveys has a closer application to the concerns of human life than that of any other of Shakespeare's plays. 'It comes directly home to the bosoms and business of men.'"

 

 

An Actor's 10 key questions

alancummingacting4

1. Who am I?
2. Where am I?
3. When is it?
4. Where have I just come from?
5. What do I want?
6. Why do I want it?
7. Why do I want it now?
8. What will happen if I don't get it now?
9. How will I get what I want by doing what?
10. What must I overcome? (full article here)

Assignments due
read them in full

stephenkingworking11

 

Thursday, March 29 in class. A Doll's House essay with bubble comments written out. 100-point participation grade.

 

Friday, April 27. Final essay/exam. See details here.

 

Monday, April 16 by 15:30 Full draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 4-16-18, Spring final essay DRAFT. This draft is 25% of the spring final essay grade.

 

Friday, May 4 by 15:30. Final draft of spring final essay to turnitin assignment 5-4-18, Spring final essay FINAL. This final draft is 75% of the spring final essay grade. The spring final essay, begin your final exam, is worth 20% of your spring semester grade.
 

 

Extra- extra-credit

othellorsc2015 

Choose a small section of Othello, no longer than three minutes in performance. Perform it for the class, complete with blocking. Let the classroom be your stage.

 

 

Writing documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
LBH sentences crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Comma usage quick guide
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center

 

 

 

Shakespeare's language
prose and verse

 

 

Shakespeare's language
iambic pentameter

 

 

Shakespeare's language
exploring a soliloquy

 

 

March 19-23

Weekly calendar

 

Monday

tolstoy10 

 

 


 

Today. In-class essay, A Doll's House.

Tonight. Familiarize yourself with Shakespeare's language by reading this document (link here); then read Othello 1.1. (That's Act 1, scene 1 for the uninitiated.)
     
Use the scene-by-scene summary (link here). Act 1 is exposition. Whom do we meet? What are they like? What are their relationships? What do they want? What conflicts are introduced? Read dramatically.
     Don't worry about understanding everything the characters say. Drama matters more.

We will be using the RSC production from 2015 in class (link here). You can rent it from Digital Theater (link here), which might be a good idea. You'll be writing your semester final exam essay on Othello, and you could use the production for that essay.

You will be keeping a journal, too. Questions are here (link here). Respond to numbered questions for 1.1. I'll be checking your responses for quiz grades. You will always be required to respond to numbered questions.

Ongoing.

 

 

Tuesday

chekov10 

 

 


 

Today. Final exam essay. Othello 1.1.

Tonight. Read Othello 1.2-1.3.272, end of Othello's speech. Use the scene-by-scene summary (link here) and in your journal, respond to the numbered questions on the reading guide (link here). Read dramatically.

     I cannot recommend enough that you rent The RSC's 2015 production (link here). One sees a play.

Ongoing. Sunday, March 25. Peergrade 3-19-18, A Doll's House essay due by 22:00. The door for peergrading closes at 22:00, never to re-open.

 

 

Wednesday

chinuaachebecolor10 

 

 

 

 

Today. Othello 1.2-1.3.272, end of Othello's speech.

Final essay/exam assignment posted. Read it through and begin choosing a topic. Choosing now, lets you read the rest of the play with some serious intention, lets your focus your note-taking, evidence-gathering, thinking.

Tonight. Read Othello 1.3.272-end of 1.3/Act 1. Use the scene-by-scene summary (link here) and in your notebook, take notes, reflect, collect quotations and thinking about your final exam essay. Read dramatically.

Ongoing. Sunday, March 25. Peergrade 3-19-18, A Doll's House essay due by 22:00. The door for peergrading closes at 22:00, never to re-open.

 

 

Thursday

neruda10 

 

 

 

 

Today. Othello 1.3.272-end of 1.3/Act 1.

Tonight. Make a list of scenes you especially want to see tomorrow? Why those scenes?

Ongoing. Sunday, March 25. Peergrade 3-19-18, A Doll's House essay due by 22:00. The door for peergrading closes at 22:00, never to re-open.

 

 

Friday

wislawasymborska10 

 

 

 

 

Today. Screening day, Othello Act 1.

Tonight. If you have not done so already, set up a notebook for your reading/study of Othello. Place your final essay topic/s atop each page. Indicate Act and scene in the usual way: Act.scene.line/s: e.g. 1.3.45-67.

Organize that notebook in some sensible way, such as the one I showed you in class: three columns: 1 for plot and insights into the scene; 1 for quotations; 1 for your immediate thoughts/notes about those quotations. You might for instance write "Another example of Othello's fancy vocab"; or "Iago's continuing use of religious diction, showing his profane intellect"; or "Othello's syntax is changing to indicate his passion."

Watch the video Shakespeare's language, exploring a soliloquy, posted in the middle column; learn what a soliloquy is and what the actor uses to help him understand and perform a speech; then read Iago's soliloquy at the end of Act 1. Apply those techniques to Iago's speech to see how it might be performed and how performance enhances meaning. What do we learn about Iago in the speech? Why have Iago soliloquize here to end the Act?

     Looking back on Act 1. Prepare responses to these questions:

1) What conflicts has the play introduced in Act 1, external ones and internal-to-character ones. Think Iago and Othello. Find exact moments/evidence to define your views.

2) What is Othello's relationship to Desdemona. Why does he love her? How much does he love her? Find exact language to define your views.

Ongoing. Sunday, March 25. Peergrade 3-19-18, A Doll's House essay due by 22:00. The door for peergrading closes at 22:00, never to re-open.
 

Othello
reading links

othelloproductionimages2015iagoandothello2015photobykeithpattisoncrsc163878f1475e8c06724f44b8b73494ed2f9bdctmbimg1824

Scene-by-scene summary
Othello, introduction from RSC
Notebook questions from Cambridge
Shakespeare's language from RSC
Selections from The Prince
Selections from The Book of The Courtier
Playing Othello, Hugh Quarshie

 

 

Othello, a racist play?

 

 

Shakespeare's language
shared lines

 

 

OTHELLO AS TRAGEDY
by William Hazlitt

pxWilliamHazlittselfportrait11 "It has been said that tragedy purifies the affections by terror and pity. That is, it substitutes imaginary sympathy for mere selfishness. It gives us a high and permanent interest, beyond ourselves, in humanity as such. It raises the great, the remote, and the possible to an equality with the real, the little and the near. It makes man a partaker with his kind. It subdues and softens the stubbornness of his will. It teaches him that there are and have been others like himself, by showing him as in a glass what they have felt, thought, and done. It opens the chambers of the human heart. It leaves nothing indifferent to us that can affect our common nature. It excites our sensibility by exhibiting the passions wound up to the utmost pitch by the power of imagination or the temptation of circumstances; and corrects their fatal excesses in ourselves by pointing to the greater extent of sufferings and of crimes to which they have led others. Tragedy creates a balance of the affections. It makes us thoughtful spectators in the lists of life. It is the refiner of the species; a discipline of humanity. The habitual study of poetry and works of imagination is one chief part of a well-grounded education. A taste for liberal art is necessary to complete the character of a gentleman, Science alone is hard and mechanical. It exercises the understanding upon things out of ourselves, while it leaves the affections unemployed, or engrossed with our own immediate, narrow interests.—OTHELLO furnishes an illustration of these remarks. It excites our sympathy in an extraordinary degree. The moral it conveys has a closer application to the concerns of human life than that of any other of Shakespeare's plays. 'It comes directly home to the bosoms and business of men.'"

 

 

An Actor's 10 key questions

alancummingacting3

1. Who am I?
2. Where am I?
3. When is it?
4. Where have I just come from?
5. What do I want?
6. Why do I want it?
7. Why do I want it now?
8. What will happen if I don't get it now?
9. How will I get what I want by doing what?
10. What must I overcome? (full article here)

Assignments due
read them in full

stephenkingworking10

 

Monday, March 19. In-class essay on a Doll's House. You will upload your essay to 3-19-18, A Doll's House: 100-point essay at the end of class. You may bring to class one sheet containing a thesis and an outline.  

     Essay topics here (link here).

     Review the comments on you first essay on A Doll's House.

     Choose a way to focus your thinking, then write a few hundred words defining and developing your view, making ample reference to the text and working from evidence (wfe). Do more with evidence.
     Continue improving your ability to write engaging opening and closing ¶s (See Trimble, Writing with Style.).
     Follow your line of thinking, continuing to break from the 5-¶ model, using ¶ hooks to transition from topic topic/¶ to ¶.

Peergrade will remain open for submission until 3-19-18, 22:00, when the door for submission will close and lock.

 

Sunday, March 25. Peergrade 3-19-18, A Doll's House essay due by 22:00. The door for peergrading closes and locks at 22:00.

 

Tuesday, March 27 by 8:00. Responses to peergrade feedback, including a final comment.

 

Friday, April 27. Final essay/exam. See details here.
 

 

 

Extra- extra-credits
1) Julius Caesar from NT Live
buy tickets here

I will be at the Marq*E, Thursday, March 22.

2) Choose a small section of Othello, no longer than three minutes in performance. Perform it for the class, complete with blocking. Let the classroom be your stage.

 

 

Writing documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
LBH sentences crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Comma usage quick guide
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center

 

 

 

Shakespeare's language
prose and verse

 

 

Shakespeare's language
iambic pentameter

 

 

Shakespeare's language
exploring a soliloquy

 

 

March 5-9

Weekly calendar

 

Monday

tolstoy9 

 

 


 

Today. No classes. Raffle holiday.

Tonight.

Ongoing.

 

 

Tuesday

chekov9 

 

 


 

Today. A Doll's House Act 2.

A few hundred words about Nora essay will post today at 12:20. See your grade and my comments. I want to know two things about those comments: 1) are they concrete and helpful?; 2) is the format good?

Have Othello ready to go after Spring Break. Any good edition will do.

Tonight. Read A Doll's House pages 62-79 [She sits down at one side of the table.]. In your notebook, prepare responses to these questions (link here).

Ongoing. Friday, March 2. 3-2-18, A few hundred words about Nora: a 50-point essay   Upload essay to turnitin and peergrade 3-2-18, A few hundred words about Nora: a 50-point essay by 15:30. **Remove heading and name from essay. Begin with title.** Peegrade open until 22:00, when the door will close.

 

 

Wednesday

chinuaachebecolor9 

 

 

 

 

Today. A Doll's House pages 62-79 [She sits down at one side of the table.].

Tonight. Read A Doll's House pages 79-86, end of Act 3/play. In your notebook, prepare responses to these questions (link here).

Ongoing.

 

 

Thursday

neruda9 

 

 

 

 

Today. A Doll's House pages 79-86, end of Act 3/play.

Tonight. For Monday, March 19, the day of our return. You will write an in-class essay on A Doll's House. Topics here (link here). You should do some preparation, at least making a thesis and a list of supporting evidence. You will upload your essay to turnitin at the end of class.

For Tuesday, read Othello 1.1. (That's Act 1, scene 1 for the uninitiated.) Use the scene-by-scene summary (link here). Whom do we meet and what is their situation? Read dramatically. Don't worry about understanding everything the characters say. Drama matters more.

We will be using the RSC production from 2015 in class (link here). You can rent it from Digital Theater (link here), which might be a good idea. You'll be writing your semester final exam essay on Othello, and you could use the production for that essay.

You will be keeping a journal, too. Questions are here (link here). Respond to numbered questions for 1.1. I'll be checking your responses for quiz grades. You will always be required to respond to numbered questions.

Ongoing.

 

 

Friday

wislawasymborska9 

 

 

 

 

Today. No classes. Raffle holiday.

Tonight. See assignments listed under Thursday.

Ongoing.
 

A Doll's House
reading links

dollshouseposter2

Reading a play
An actor's 10 key questions
A Doll's House quick context
Kate Chopin's "The Story of an Hour"
Women in Victorian England, some context for Nora
A Doll's House 3-Act structure
Questions for your notebook

 

 

Ibsen, George Bernard Shaw

gbshaw2"Ibsen saw that. . . the more familiar the situation, the more interesting the play. Shakespear had put ourselves on the stage but not our situations. Our uncles seldom murder our fathers, and cannot legally marry our mothers; we do not meet witches; our kings are not as a rule stabbed and succeeded by their stabbers; and when we raise money by bills we do not promise to pay pounds of our flesh. Ibsen supplies the want left by Shakespear. He gives us not only ourselves, but ourselves in our own situations. The things that happen to his stage figures are things that happen to us. One consequence is that his plays are much more important to us than ShakespearÕs. Another is that they are capable both of hurting us cruelly and of filling us with excited hopes of escape from idealistic tyrannies, and with visions of intenser life in the future."

 

 

A Doll's House
Nineteenth-century reaction

ibsen2"Henrietta Frances Lord, the first reputable English translator of A Doll's House, was living in Stockholm when the play first appeared, and she has written about the intellectual excitement of the event, the buzz in cultivated homes where Ibsen was regarded as Scandinavia's great teacher. The play was published on 4 December 1879, a good two weeks before its first performance, and within a month the entire edition of 8,000 copies had been sold out and reprinted by IbsenÕs Danish publisher. People were avidly reading A Doll's House as a significant publishing event, so even before the curtain rose in Copenhagen's Royal Theatre on 21 December the play was already a cause célébre in Scandinavia. "Such furious discussion did Nora rouse when the play came out, writes Frances Lord, that many a social invitation given in Stockholm during that winter bore the words, 'You are requested not to mention Ibsen's Doll's House.' Heated debate, difference of opinion in domestic parlors, and endless talk were the dominant responses to Ibsen's play after its opening in the major Scandinavian capitals in the New Year, in Stockholm, Christiania, Bergen, and Helsinki.
     "The same is true of its contemporary reception in Germany. To add even more vehemence to the intense commotion, Ibsen was obliged by the management of the first German production to provide an alternative ending to the play. Hedwig Niemann-Raabe, a famous leading lady, had refused to perform onstage an action that she would have found abhorrent in life: 'J would never leave my children!' she declared. To forestall an even greater disaster to his text, Ibsen drafted a conciliatory ending in which Nora sinks to her knees at the doorway of the childrenÕs bedroom and abandons her emancipation for their good. (He called it a 'barbaric outrage' to be used only in emergencies.) This was the version first seen in Flensburg in February 1880 and later in Hamburg, Dresden, Hanover, and Berlin. Ibsen attended the first authentic production at Munich's Residenztheater in March 1880 and reported on the response: 'Down here A Doll's House has caused the same commotion as at home. People have come out passionately either for or against the play, and it has scarcely ever happened in Munich before that a drama has been so vehemently discussed as this.' When the original ending was eventually restored in Berlin, there were further altercations about the omission of a necessary fourth act."

 

 

How do actors use movement
and space to show emotion,
relationships?

 

 

An Actor's 10 key questions

alancummingacting2

1. Who am I?
2. Where am I?
3. When is it?
4. Where have I just come from?
5. What do I want?
6. Why do I want it?
7. Why do I want it now?
8. What will happen if I don't get it now?
9. How will I get what I want by doing what?
10. What must I overcome? (full article here)

Assignments due
read them in full

stephenkingworking9

 

Monday, March 19. In-class essay on a Doll's House. You will upload your essay to 3-19-18, A Doll's House: 100-point essay at the end of class. You may bring to class one sheet containing a thesis and an outline.  

     Essay topics here (link here).

     Review the comments on you first essay on A Doll's House.

     Choose a way to focus your thinking, then write a few hundred words defining and developing your view, making ample reference to the text and working from evidence (wfe). Do more with evidence.
     Continue improving your ability to write engaging opening and closing ¶s (See Trimble, Writing with Style.).
     Follow your line of thinking, continuing to break from the 5-¶ model, using ¶ hooks to transition from topic topic/¶ to ¶.

Peergrade will remain open for submission until 3-19-18, 22:00, when the door for submission will close, never to re-open.

 

Sunday, March 25. Peergrade 3-19-18, A Doll's House essay due by 22:00. The door for peergrading closes at 22:00, never to re-open.
 

 

 

The next book you need, Inferno
Buy only this edition

inferno

 

Writing documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
LBH sentences crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Comma usage quick guide
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center

 

 

A Doll's House, central theme

morajan2"But all those I spoke to agree that the central dilemma the play presents, of how to be yourself and true to yourself, while being married and being a parent, is not exclusive to women. 'In a sense,' says Caroline McGinn, 'Nora's famous dramatic exit is something many parents do five days a week.' And perhaps this is the play's most radical aspect: that it presents a woman's dilemma as a human dilemma, relevant to both sexes, when so often women's stories are treated as a special subject of concern only to women (evidence of which can be seen everywhere in culture, from the small number of men who read books by and about women to the girl-heavy audience for the RSC's smash-hit musical Matilda, when there is no equivalent gender bias at Charlie and the Chocolate Factory down the road). 'I feel really strongly that we still obsess around male protagonists,' Cracknell says. 'There's a thousands-of-years-long legacy of storytelling in which men have been the protagonists—we go back to telling their stories over and over.' McGinn says A Doll's House remains thrilling as a critic because 'you go to new plays all the time where the ratio of men to women is 80/20.'"

 

 

Playing Nora

 

 

Nora, a modern short

 

 

Playwrights on Ibsen

 

 

 

February 26-March 2

Weekly calendar

 

Monday

tolstoy8 

 

 


 

Today. A Doll's House pages 7-17 [Mrs. Linde starts, then turns away to the window.]

Tonight. Read A Doll's House pages 17-22 [Dr. Rank, Helmer, and Mrs. Linde go down the stairs: the Nursemaid comes into the room with the children, then Nora, shutting the door behind her.] In your notebook, prepare responses to these reading questions (link here). Don't worry so much with those questions. Instead, let's continue our focus on Nora from today. Make a list of Nora's "manipulations" and think about the person they show you. Try to consider those actions in context, defining the values in play and the motivations for them.

Ongoing. Friday, March 2. 3-2-18, A few hundred words about Nora: a 50-point essay   Upload essay to turnitin and peergrade 3-2-18, A few hundred words about Nora: a 50-point essay by 15:30. **Remove heading and name from essay. Begin with title.** Peegrade open until 22:00, when the door will close.

 

 

Tuesday

chekov8 

 

 


 

Today. A Doll's House pages 17-22.

Tonight. Read A Doll's House pages 22-34, end of Act 1. In your notebook, prepare responses to these questions (link here).

Ongoing. Friday, March 2. 3-2-18, A few hundred words about Nora: a 50-point essay   Upload essay to turnitin and peergrade 3-2-18, A few hundred words about Nora: a 50-point essay by 15:30. **Remove heading and name from essay. Begin with title.** Peegrade open until 22:00, when the door will close.

 

 

Wednesday

chinuaachebecolor8 

 

 

 

 

Today. A Doll's House pages 22-34, end of Act 1.

Tonight. Read A Doll's House pages 35-44 [He nods to her, goes with his papers into his room, and shuts the door behind him,] In your notebook, prepare responses to these questions (link here).

Ongoing. Friday, March 2. 3-2-18, A few hundred words about Nora: a 50-point essay   Upload essay to turnitin and peergrade 3-2-18, A few hundred words about Nora: a 50-point essay by 15:30. **Remove heading and name from essay. Begin with title.** Peegrade open until 22:00, when the door will close.

 

 

Thursday

neruda8 

 

 

 

 

Today. A Doll's House pages 35-44 [He nods to her, goes with his papers into his room, and shuts the door behind him,]

Tonight. Read A Doll's House pages 44-51 [She walks over and bolts Helmer's door. The maid opens the hall door for Krogstad and shuts it again behind him. He is wearing a fur coat, over-shoes, and a fur cap.] In your notebook, prepare responses to these questions (link here).

Ongoing. Friday, March 2. 3-2-18, A few hundred words about Nora: a 50-point essay   Upload essay to turnitin and peergrade 3-2-18, A few hundred words about Nora: a 50-point essay by 15:30. **Remove heading and name from essay. Begin with title.** Peegrade open until 22:00, when the door will close.

 

 

Friday

wislawasymborska8 

 

 

 

 

Today. A Doll's House pages 44-51.

2. 3-2-18, A few hundred words about Nora: a 50-point essay  Upload essay to turnitin and peergrade 3-2-18, A few hundred words about Nora: a 50-point essay by 15:30. **Remove heading and name from essay. Begin with title.** Peegrade open until 22:00, when the door will close.

Tonight. Read A Doll's House pages 51-61, end of Act 2. In your notebook, prepare responses to these questions (link here).

Ongoing. Sunday, 3-4-18. Peergrade, 3-2-18, A few hundred words about Nora: a 50-point essay by 22:00. No anonymity. You will see the name of the writer and the reviewer. Don't break the reciprocal code.
 

A Doll's House
reading links

dollshouseposter1

Reading a play
An actor's 10 key questions
A Doll's House quick context
Kate Chopin's "The Story of an Hour"
Women in Victorian England, some context for Nora
A Doll's House 3-Act structure
Questions for your notebook

 

 

Ibsen, George Bernard Shaw

gbshaw1"Ibsen saw that. . . the more familiar the situation, the more interesting the play. Shakespear had put ourselves on the stage but not our situations. Our uncles seldom murder our fathers, and cannot legally marry our mothers; we do not meet witches; our kings are not as a rule stabbed and succeeded by their stabbers; and when we raise money by bills we do not promise to pay pounds of our flesh. Ibsen supplies the want left by Shakespear. He gives us not only ourselves, but ourselves in our own situations. The things that happen to his stage figures are things that happen to us. One consequence is that his plays are much more important to us than ShakespearÕs. Another is that they are capable both of hurting us cruelly and of filling us with excited hopes of escape from idealistic tyrannies, and with visions of intenser life in the future."

 

 

A Doll's House
Nineteenth-century reaction

ibsen1"Henrietta Frances Lord, the first reputable English translator of A Doll's House, was living in Stockholm when the play first appeared, and she has written about the intellectual excitement of the event, the buzz in cultivated homes where Ibsen was regarded as Scandinavia's great teacher. The play was published on 4 December 1879, a good two weeks before its first performance, and within a month the entire edition of 8,000 copies had been sold out and reprinted by IbsenÕs Danish publisher. People were avidly reading A Doll's House as a significant publishing event, so even before the curtain rose in Copenhagen's Royal Theatre on 21 December the play was already a cause célébre in Scandinavia. "Such furious discussion did Nora rouse when the play came out, writes Frances Lord, that many a social invitation given in Stockholm during that winter bore the words, 'You are requested not to mention Ibsen's Doll's House.' Heated debate, difference of opinion in domestic parlors, and endless talk were the dominant responses to Ibsen's play after its opening in the major Scandinavian capitals in the New Year, in Stockholm, Christiania, Bergen, and Helsinki.
     "The same is true of its contemporary reception in Germany. To add even more vehemence to the intense commotion, Ibsen was obliged by the management of the first German production to provide an alternative ending to the play. Hedwig Niemann-Raabe, a famous leading lady, had refused to perform onstage an action that she would have found abhorrent in life: 'J would never leave my children!' she declared. To forestall an even greater disaster to his text, Ibsen drafted a conciliatory ending in which Nora sinks to her knees at the doorway of the childrenÕs bedroom and abandons her emancipation for their good. (He called it a 'barbaric outrage' to be used only in emergencies.) This was the version first seen in Flensburg in February 1880 and later in Hamburg, Dresden, Hanover, and Berlin. Ibsen attended the first authentic production at Munich's Residenztheater in March 1880 and reported on the response: 'Down here A Doll's House has caused the same commotion as at home. People have come out passionately either for or against the play, and it has scarcely ever happened in Munich before that a drama has been so vehemently discussed as this.' When the original ending was eventually restored in Berlin, there were further altercations about the omission of a necessary fourth act."

 

 

How do actors use movement
and space to show emotion,
relationships?

 

 

An Actor's 10 key questions

alancummingacting1

1. Who am I?
2. Where am I?
3. When is it?
4. Where have I just come from?
5. What do I want?
6. Why do I want it?
7. Why do I want it now?
8. What will happen if I don't get it now?
9. How will I get what I want by doing what?
10. What must I overcome? (full article here)

 

 

The work of Ibsen

Assignments due
read them in full

stephenkingworking8

 

Friday, March 2. 3-2-18, A few hundred words about Nora: a 50-point essay . What do you think about Nora so far? Make the case for what you think, measuring your ideas against the play's evidence. Don't worry about what I or anyone else thinks. Come to your own understanding based on your best reading of the play.
     Choose a way to focus your thinking, then write a few hundred words defining and developing your view, making ample reference to the text and working from evidence (wfe). Do more with evidence.
     Continue improving your ability to write engaging opening and closing ¶s (See Trimble, Writing with Style.).
     Follow your line of thinking, continuing to break from the 5-¶ model, using ¶ hooks to transition from topic topic/¶ to ¶.
     Upload essay to turnitin and peergrade 3-2-18, A few hundred words about Nora: a 50-point essay by 15:30. **Remove heading and name from essay. Begin with title.** Peegrade open until 22:00, when the door will close.

 

Sunday, 3-4-18. Peergrade, 3-2-18, A few hundred words about Nora: a 50-point essay by 22:00. No anonymity. You will see the name of the writer and the reviewer. Don't break the reciprocal code.

 

Tuesday, March 6. Feedback for 3-2-18, A few hundred words about Nora: a 50-point essay. I especially want to see you write comments to the reviewer.
 

 

 

The next book you need, Othello
Beginning after Spring Break

 

Writing documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
LBH sentences crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Comma usage quick guide
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center

 

 

A Doll's House, central theme

morajan1"But all those I spoke to agree that the central dilemma the play presents, of how to be yourself and true to yourself, while being married and being a parent, is not exclusive to women. 'In a sense,' says Caroline McGinn, 'Nora's famous dramatic exit is something many parents do five days a week.' And perhaps this is the play's most radical aspect: that it presents a woman's dilemma as a human dilemma, relevant to both sexes, when so often women's stories are treated as a special subject of concern only to women (evidence of which can be seen everywhere in culture, from the small number of men who read books by and about women to the girl-heavy audience for the RSC's smash-hit musical Matilda, when there is no equivalent gender bias at Charlie and the Chocolate Factory down the road). 'I feel really strongly that we still obsess around male protagonists,' Cracknell says. 'There's a thousands-of-years-long legacy of storytelling in which men have been the protagonists—we go back to telling their stories over and over.' McGinn says A Doll's House remains thrilling as a critic because 'you go to new plays all the time where the ratio of men to women is 80/20.'"

 

 

Playing Nora

 

 

Nora, a modern short

 

 

Playwrights on Ibsen

 

 

 

February 19-23

Weekly calendar

 

Monday

 

 

 


 

Today. President's Day. No classes.

Tonight.

Ongoing.

 

 

Tuesday

 

 

 


 

Today. The Road favorite passage essays are complete. See my comments at turnitin. Stronger essays defined a reason for the passage being a favorite, then examined the passage wfe to show that why, often examining how language works to create the perceived effects. Weaker essays either didn't define a reason and/or didn't examine the passage in sufficient or persuasive detail.

Something to learn from this essay is the way you relax and think, writing as you speak, perhaps more than you're used to doing. An essay is a means by which you express your ideas for another to see and understand. Nothing more.

You will need Othello in two weeks. Find the recommended version pictured in middle column. That version's recommended for its insightful notes, but another paper edition will do.

Introduction to drama, reading drama. Reading like an actor and a director and a designer. Watch Different ways of Playing a Scene to think about drama and about how actors show emotion, relationship through movement; and watch Nora to see dramatic elements in action. Costume, setting, light, sound. Ibsen uses these elements with artistic effect in A Doll's House. Nora will also introduce us to one underlying theme of A Doll's House.

Tonight. Watch the short film Nora, posted in the middle column. In your notebook, write down examples of how the film uses the elements of drama: setting; light; sound; costume. Then define what you think the film is showing us about Nora. What does she do at the end of the film and why? How does the film show us that why using the elements of drama?

Ongoing.

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Nora and elements of drama. Hamlet to show how playwrights use language.

Tonight. Look at the Character list before A Doll's House, before page one to get a sense of who is in the play and what their relationships are.

Torvald and Nora are married, with children.

Dr. Rank is a family friend.

Mrs. Kristine Linde is Nora's childhood friend, schoolmate. She also knows another of the characters, but you'll learn about that.

Nils Krogstad works with Torvald at the bank and also knows Nora.

Drama's all about action. (That's what the word drama means—to do.) As you read keep asking yourself a few basic questions: what do characters want? how do they try to get it? what helps or hinders them from getting what they want? Drama uses the term objective to define what a character wants, as in what is the character's objective?

As you read, follow the action, paying attention to each interaction between characters, reading like Sherlock would, looking for clues. Nora is the play's center. Focus on her. What does she want? Why? How does she try to get it? Does she succeed? What obstacles block her? Look for moments when Nora makes decisions of any kind, however small.

For each reading, I will post some response questions. Write them in your notebook each night in preparation for the next day's discussion. Find those questions linked here and in right column under A Doll's House reading links.

Now read A Doll's House pages 1-7 [Helmer goes into his study. The Maid shows in Mrs. Linde, who is in travelling clothes, and closes the door after her.] Prepare these questions in your notebook.

Ongoing.

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. A Doll's House 1-7 [Helmer goes into his study. The Maid shows in Mrs. Linde, who is in travelling clothes, and closes the door after her.]

Tonight. Enjoy a night off.

Ongoing.

 

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

 

Today.

Tonight. Read A Doll's House pages 7-17 [Mrs. Linde starts, then turns away to the window.] Prepare these questions in your

Ongoing.
 

A Doll's House
reading links

Reading a play
An actor's 10 key questions
A Doll's House quick context
Kate Chopin's "The Story of an Hour"
Women in Victorian England, some context for Nora
A Doll's House 3-Act structure
Questions for your notebook

 

 

Ibsen, George Bernard Shaw

"Ibsen saw that. . . the more familiar the situation, the more interesting the play. Shakespear had put ourselves on the stage but not our situations. Our uncles seldom murder our fathers, and cannot legally marry our mothers; we do not meet witches; our kings are not as a rule stabbed and succeeded by their stabbers; and when we raise money by bills we do not promise to pay pounds of our flesh. Ibsen supplies the want left by Shakespear. He gives us not only ourselves, but ourselves in our own situations. The things that happen to his stage figures are things that happen to us. One consequence is that his plays are much more important to us than ShakespearÕs. Another is that they are capable both of hurting us cruelly and of filling us with excited hopes of escape from idealistic tyrannies, and with visions of intenser life in the future."

 

 

A Doll's House
Nineteenth-century reaction

"Henrietta Frances Lord, the first reputable English translator of A Doll's House, was living in Stockholm when the play first appeared, and she has written about the intellectual excitement of the event, the buzz in cultivated homes where Ibsen was regarded as Scandinavia's great teacher. The play was published on 4 December 1879, a good two weeks before its first performance, and within a month the entire edition of 8,000 copies had been sold out and reprinted by IbsenÕs Danish publisher. People were avidly reading A Doll's House as a significant publishing event, so even before the curtain rose in Copenhagen's Royal Theatre on 21 December the play was already a cause célébre in Scandinavia. "Such furious discussion did Nora rouse when the play came out, writes Frances Lord, that many a social invitation given in Stockholm during that winter bore the words, 'You are requested not to mention Ibsen's Doll's House.' Heated debate, difference of opinion in domestic parlors, and endless talk were the dominant responses to Ibsen's play after its opening in the major Scandinavian capitals in the New Year, in Stockholm, Christiania, Bergen, and Helsinki.
     "The same is true of its contemporary reception in Germany. To add even more vehemence to the intense commotion, Ibsen was obliged by the management of the first German production to provide an alternative ending to the play. Hedwig Niemann-Raabe, a famous leading lady, had refused to perform onstage an action that she would have found abhorrent in life: 'J would never leave my children!' she declared. To forestall an even greater disaster to his text, Ibsen drafted a conciliatory ending in which Nora sinks to her knees at the doorway of the childrenÕs bedroom and abandons her emancipation for their good. (He called it a 'barbaric outrage' to be used only in emergencies.) This was the version first seen in Flensburg in February 1880 and later in Hamburg, Dresden, Hanover, and Berlin. Ibsen attended the first authentic production at Munich's Residenztheater in March 1880 and reported on the response: 'Down here A Doll's House has caused the same commotion as at home. People have come out passionately either for or against the play, and it has scarcely ever happened in Munich before that a drama has been so vehemently discussed as this.' When the original ending was eventually restored in Berlin, there were further altercations about the omission of a necessary fourth act."

 

 

How do actors use movement
and space to show emotion,
relationships?

 

 

An Actor's 10 key questions

1. Who am I?
2. Where am I?
3. When is it?
4. Where have I just come from?
5. What do I want?
6. Why do I want it?
7. Why do I want it now?
8. What will happen if I don't get it now?
9. How will I get what I want by doing what?
10. What must I overcome? (full article here)

Assignments due
read them in full


Wednesday, February 21 by 8:00. Responses to Peergrade feedback on 2-15-18, The Road, favorite passage essay.

 

 

The next book you need, Othello

 

Writing documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
LBH sentences crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Comma usage quick guide
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good questions
MLA style center

 

 

A Doll's House, central theme

"But all those I spoke to agree that the central dilemma the play presents, of how to be yourself and true to yourself, while being married and being a parent, is not exclusive to women. 'In a sense,' says Caroline McGinn, 'Nora's famous dramatic exit is something many parents do five days a week.' And perhaps this is the play's most radical aspect: that it presents a woman's dilemma as a human dilemma, relevant to both sexes, when so often women's stories are treated as a special subject of concern only to women (evidence of which can be seen everywhere in culture, from the small number of men who read books by and about women to the girl-heavy audience for the RSC's smash-hit musical Matilda, when there is no equivalent gender bias at Charlie and the Chocolate Factory down the road). 'I feel really strongly that we still obsess around male protagonists,' Cracknell says. 'There's a thousands-of-years-long legacy of storytelling in which men have been the protagonists—we go back to telling their stories over and over.' McGinn says A Doll's House remains thrilling as a critic because 'you go to new plays all the time where the ratio of men to women is 80/20.'"

 

 

Playing Nora

 

 

Nora, a modern short

 

 

Playwrights on Ibsen

 

 

The work of Ibsen

 

February 12-16

Monday

 

 

 


 

Today. Kavi and Jonathon lead our discussion of pages 226-250.

Be acquiring our next book. Details in middle column.

Tonight. Read The Road pages 251-287. Prepare your own thoughts and review these questions. Come prepared to engage in thoughtful and animated discussion.

Be sure to respond to peergrade feedback for 2-6-18, The Road essat #1 revision by 8:00 tomorrow. That's 8 am.

Ongoing. Have your copy of Ibsen ready to go next week. See middle column for details.

Thursday, February 15 by 15:30. 2-15-18, The Road essay favorite passage: 50-point essay.

 

 

Tuesday

 

 

 


 

Today. Diego S and Bach lead our discussion of The Road 251-287.

Tonight.

Ongoing. Thursday, February 15 by 15:30. 2-15-18, The Road essay favorite passage: 50-point essay..

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Essay work in class, favorite passage essay, due tomorrow by 15:30. Bring your copy of The Road.

Tonight.

Ongoing. Thursday, February 15 by 15:30. 2-15-18, The Road essay favorite passage: 50-point essay.

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Essay work in class. Essay due by 15:30 to 2-15-18, The Road essay favorite passage: 50-point essay.

Tonight. Have Ibsen ready to go next week.

Ongoing. Monday, February 19 by 22:00. Peergrade, The Road favorite passage essay. Responses to feedback due by 8:00 (am) Wednesday, February 21.

 

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Raffle holiday. No class.

Tonight. Have your copy of Ibsen ready to go next week. First reading Tuesday night.

Ongoing. Monday, February 19 by 22:00. Peergrade, The Road favorite passage essay. Responses to feedback due by 8:00 (am) Wednesday, February 21.
 

The Road
reading links

reader's guide from publisher
scariest passage in all literature? (spoilers)
NYT review (spoilers)
review by James Wood (spoilers)
Darkness by Lord Byron
McCarthy on the origin of language
McCarthy's biography
Psychological power of storytelling
Selected scholarly articles on The Road
Finding meaning in life
The Road vocabulary lists
List of The Road reading questions
D
iscussion guidelines and reading schedule
 

 

Cormac McCarthy speaks
to Oprah Winfrey

 

 

The quest for God in The Road

 

 

The Road
Alan Warner

"We can divide the contemporary American novel into two traditions, or two social classes. The Tough Guy tradition comes up from Fenimore Cooper, with a touch of Poe, through Melville, Faulkner and Hemingway.
     "The Savant tradition comes from Hawthorne, especially through Henry James, Edith Wharton and Scott Fitzgerald. You could argue that the latter is liberal, east coast/New York, while the Tough Guys are gothic, reactionary, nihilistic, openly religious, southern or fundamentally rural. The Savants' blood line (curiously unrepresentative of Americans generally) has gained undoubted ascendancy in the literary firmament of the US. Upper middle class, urban and cosmopolitan, they or their own species review themselves. The current Tough Guys are a murder of great, hopelessly masculine, undomesticated writers, whose critical reputations have been and still are today cruelly divergent, adrift and largely unrewarded compared to the contemporary Savant school. In literature as in American life, success must be total and contrasted 'failure' fatally dispiriting.      "But in both content and technical riches, the Tough Guys are the true legislators of tortured American souls. They could include novelists Thomas McGuane, William Gaddis, Barry Hannah, Leon Rooke, Harry Crews, Jim Harrison, Mark Richard, James Welch and Denis Johnson. Cormac McCarthy is granddaddy to them all. New York critics may prefer their perfidy to be ignored, comforting themselves with the superlatives for All the Pretty Horses, but we should remember that the history of Cormac McCarthy and his achievement is not an American dream but near on 30 years of neglect for a writer who, since The Orchard Keeper in 1965, produced only masterworks in elegant succession. Now he has given us his great American nightmare.      "The Road is a novel of transforming power and formal risk. Abandoning gruff but profound male camaraderie, McCarthy instead sounds the limits of imaginable love and despair between a diligent father and his timid young son, 'each other's world entire'. The initial experience of the novel is sobering and oppressive, its final effect is emotionally shattering.
     "All the modern novel can do is done here. After the great historical fictions of the American west, Blood Meridian and The Border Trilogy, The Road is no artistic pinnacle for McCarthy but instead a masterly reclamation of those midnight-black, gothic worlds of Outer Dark (1968) and the similarly terrifying but beautiful Child of God (1973). How will this vital novel be positioned in today's America by Savants, Tough Guys or worse? Could its nightmare vistas reinforce those in the US who are determined to manipulate its people into believing that terror came into being only in 2001? This text, in its fragility, exists uneasily within such ill times. It's perverse that the scorched earth which The Road depicts often brings to mind those real apocalypses of southern Iraq beneath black oil smoke, or New Orleans—vistas not unconnected with the contemporary American regime."

Assignments due
read them in full


Thursday, February 15 by 15:30. 2-15-18, The Road essay favorite passage: 50-point essay. Each of you has chosen a passage to begin your discussion. Now that you've finished the novel, I want you to choose your favorite passage, however you determine it.
     You will write an essay of at least 500 words about why that passage is your favorite. Does the passage use literary elements in an interesting way? Does it make you feel? Does it make you understand something? Does it think about theme in an interesting way?
     Define your why—that's your thesis—then write about it in an essay, using quotations to illustrate and explain your topic and ideas. Continue to practice writing effective opening and closing ¶s and to use ¶ hooks to transition from topic to topic. Do more with evidence. Be engaged. Be interesting.

Monday, February 19 by 22:00. Peergrade, The Road favorite passage essay. Responses to feedback due by 8:00 (am) Wednesday, February 21.

 

 

The next book you need

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
LBH sentences crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Comma usage quick guide
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good quesstions
MLA style center

 

 

From McCarthy's other works

"You never know what worse luck your bad luck has saved you from." No Country For Old Men

"I got what I needed instead of what I wanted and that's just about the best kind of luck you can have." The Sunset Limited

"The point is there ain't no point." No Country For Old Men

"The man who believes that the secrets of the world are forever hidden lives in mystery and fear. Superstition will drag him down." Blood Meridian

"The world is quite ruthless in selecting between the dream and the reality, even where we will not." All The Pretty Horses

"People complain about the bad things that happen to em that they don't deserve but they seldom mention the good. About what they done to deserve them things" No Country for Old Men

"It is personal. That's what an education does. It makes the world personal." The Sunset Limited

"In the end we all come to be cured of our sentiments." All the Pretty Horses

"Love makes men foolish." Cities of the Plain

"If a man's at odds to know his own mind it's because he hasn't got aught but his mind to know it with." Blood Meridian

"Those who cannot see must rely upon what has gone before. If I do not wish to appear so foolish as to drink from an empty glass I must remember whether I have drained it or not." Cities of the Plain

"You always pay too much. Particularly for promises. There aint no such thing as a bargain promise." No Country for Old Men

February 5-9

Monday

 

 

 


 

Today. Raffle holiday. No classes.

Be acquiring our next book. Details in middle column.

Tonight.

Ongoing.

 

Tuesday

 

 

 


 

Today. Grant and Nick lead our discussion of The Road 168-189.

Tonight. Study for tomorrow's vocab quiz, The Road list 4. Sentences might or might not come from the novel. Vocabulary lists now linked under The Road reading links in right column.

Ongoing. Sunday, February 11 by 22:00. Peergrade, 2-6-18, The Road essay #1 revision. A 100-point participation grade. Be sure to respond to the feedback you receive.

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Vocab. quiz The Road list 4. Here are zipgrade ids.

Tonight. Read The Road pages 190-204. Prepare your own thoughts and review these questions. Come prepared to engage in thoughtful and animated discussion.

Ongoing. Sunday, February 11 by 22:00. Peergrade, 2-6-18, The Road essay #1 revision. A 100-point participation grade. Be sure to respond to the feedback you receive.

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Luke and Connor lead our discussion of The Road 190-204.

Tonight. Read The Road pages 205-225. Prepare your own thoughts and review these questions. Come prepared to engage in thoughtful and animated discussion.

See your The Road essay #1 revision essay for grade and comments.

Ongoing. Sunday, February 11 by 22:00. Peergrade, 2-6-18, The Road essay #1 revision. A 100-point participation grade. Be sure to respond to the feedback you receive.

 

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Diego F. and Dylan lead our discussion of The Road 205-225.

Tonight. Read The Road pages 226-250. Prepare your own thoughts and review these questions. Come prepared to engage in thoughtful and animated discussion.

Ongoing.Sunday, February 11 by 22:00. Peergrade, 2-6-18, The Road essay #1 revision. A 100-point participation grade. Be sure to respond to the feedback you receive.
 

The Road
reading links

reader's guide from publisher
scariest passage in all literature? (spoilers)
NYT review (spoilers)
review by James Wood (spoilers)
Darkness by Lord Byron
McCarthy on the origin of language
McCarthy's biography
Psychological power of storytelling
Selected scholarly articles on The Road
Finding meaning in life
The Road vocabulary lists
List of The Road reading questions
D
iscussion guidelines and reading schedule
 

 

Cormac McCarthy speaks
to Oprah Winfrey

 

 

The quest for God in The Road

 

 

The Road
Alan Warner

"We can divide the contemporary American novel into two traditions, or two social classes. The Tough Guy tradition comes up from Fenimore Cooper, with a touch of Poe, through Melville, Faulkner and Hemingway.
     "The Savant tradition comes from Hawthorne, especially through Henry James, Edith Wharton and Scott Fitzgerald. You could argue that the latter is liberal, east coast/New York, while the Tough Guys are gothic, reactionary, nihilistic, openly religious, southern or fundamentally rural. The Savants' blood line (curiously unrepresentative of Americans generally) has gained undoubted ascendancy in the literary firmament of the US. Upper middle class, urban and cosmopolitan, they or their own species review themselves. The current Tough Guys are a murder of great, hopelessly masculine, undomesticated writers, whose critical reputations have been and still are today cruelly divergent, adrift and largely unrewarded compared to the contemporary Savant school. In literature as in American life, success must be total and contrasted 'failure' fatally dispiriting.      "But in both content and technical riches, the Tough Guys are the true legislators of tortured American souls. They could include novelists Thomas McGuane, William Gaddis, Barry Hannah, Leon Rooke, Harry Crews, Jim Harrison, Mark Richard, James Welch and Denis Johnson. Cormac McCarthy is granddaddy to them all. New York critics may prefer their perfidy to be ignored, comforting themselves with the superlatives for All the Pretty Horses, but we should remember that the history of Cormac McCarthy and his achievement is not an American dream but near on 30 years of neglect for a writer who, since The Orchard Keeper in 1965, produced only masterworks in elegant succession. Now he has given us his great American nightmare.      "The Road is a novel of transforming power and formal risk. Abandoning gruff but profound male camaraderie, McCarthy instead sounds the limits of imaginable love and despair between a diligent father and his timid young son, 'each other's world entire'. The initial experience of the novel is sobering and oppressive, its final effect is emotionally shattering.
     "All the modern novel can do is done here. After the great historical fictions of the American west, Blood Meridian and The Border Trilogy, The Road is no artistic pinnacle for McCarthy but instead a masterly reclamation of those midnight-black, gothic worlds of Outer Dark (1968) and the similarly terrifying but beautiful Child of God (1973). How will this vital novel be positioned in today's America by Savants, Tough Guys or worse? Could its nightmare vistas reinforce those in the US who are determined to manipulate its people into believing that terror came into being only in 2001? This text, in its fragility, exists uneasily within such ill times. It's perverse that the scorched earth which The Road depicts often brings to mind those real apocalypses of southern Iraq beneath black oil smoke, or New Orleans—vistas not unconnected with the contemporary American regime."

Assignments due
read them in full


Tuesday, February 6 by 15:30. The Road essay #1 revision due to turnitin and Peergrade assignment 2-6-18, The Road essay #1 revision. A 100-point essay grade. Give your essay more focus on one central and sustained topic; more wfe; stronger opening and closing ¶s; use ¶ hooks. Feel emboldened to use any new information from the novel to enrich your thinking.

Wednesday, February 7. Vocab. quiz The Road list 4.

Sunday, February 11 by 22:00. Peergrade, 2-6-18, The Road essay #1 revision. A 100-point participation grade. You are to respond to the feedback you receive by 8:00 Tuesday, February 13. If you do not respond, you can score no higher than 85.

 

 

The next book you need

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
LBH sentences crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Comma usage quick guide
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good quesstions
MLA style center

 

 

From McCarthy's other works

"You never know what worse luck your bad luck has saved you from." No Country For Old Men

"I got what I needed instead of what I wanted and that's just about the best kind of luck you can have." The Sunset Limited

"The point is there ain't no point." No Country For Old Men

"The man who believes that the secrets of the world are forever hidden lives in mystery and fear. Superstition will drag him down." Blood Meridian

"The world is quite ruthless in selecting between the dream and the reality, even where we will not." All The Pretty Horses

"People complain about the bad things that happen to em that they don't deserve but they seldom mention the good. About what they done to deserve them things" No Country for Old Men

"It is personal. That's what an education does. It makes the world personal." The Sunset Limited

"In the end we all come to be cured of our sentiments." All the Pretty Horses

"Love makes men foolish." Cities of the Plain

"If a man's at odds to know his own mind it's because he hasn't got aught but his mind to know it with." Blood Meridian

"Those who cannot see must rely upon what has gone before. If I do not wish to appear so foolish as to drink from an empty glass I must remember whether I have drained it or not." Cities of the Plain

"You always pay too much. Particularly for promises. There aint no such thing as a bargain promise." No Country for Old Men

January 29-February 2

Monday

 

 

 


 

Today. Juan and Keenan lead our discussion of The Road pages 131-144.

Be acquiring our next book. Details in middle column.

Tonight. Read The Road pages 145-167. Prepare your own thoughts and review these questions. Come prepared to engage in thoughtful and animated discussion.

Read through your The Road essay #1 comments to see where you need improvement for the essay revision.

Ongoing. Friday, February 2. A revised draft of The Road essay #1 opening ¶ uploaded to peegrade assignment 2-2-18 Revised opening ¶, The Road essay #1. 50-point participation grade.

Sunday, February 4 by 22:00. Peergrade, 2-4-18 Revised opening ¶, The Road essay #1 A 50-point participation grade.

Tuesday, February 6 by 15:30. The Road essay #1 revision due to turnitin and Peergrade assignment 2-6-18, The Road essay #1 revision. A 100-point essay grade. Give your essay more focus on one central and sustained topic; more wfe; stronger opening and closing ¶s; use ¶ hooks. Feel emboldened to use any new information from the novel to enrich your thinking. .

 

Tuesday

 

 

 


 

Today. Will and Juan Carlos lead our discussion of The Road 145-167.

Tonight. Study for tomorrow's vocab quiz, The Road list 3. Sentences might or might not come from the novel. Vocabulary lists now linked under The Road reading links in right column.

Ongoing. Friday, February 2. A revised draft of The Road essay #1 opening ¶ uploaded to peegrade assignment 2-2-18 Revised opening ¶, The Road essay #1. 50-point participation

Sunday, February 4 by 22:00. Peergrade, 2-4-18 Revised opening ¶, The Road essay #1 A 50-point participation grade.

Tuesday, February 6 by 15:30. The Road essay #1 revision due to turnitin and Peergrade assignment 2-6-18, The Road essay #1 revision. A 100-point essay grade. Give your essay more focus on one central and sustained topic; more wfe; stronger opening and closing ¶s; use ¶ hooks. Feel emboldened to use any new information from the novel to enrich your thinking. .

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Vocab. quiz The Road list 3. Here are zipgrade ids.

Tonight. Review writing opening ¶s in Trimble, Writing with Style Chapter 3. Begin drafting your revised opening ¶.

Before Thursday's class, look through your The Road essay #1 and my comments. I want you to come to class with questions about essay writing, your essay in particular and my comments.

Ongoing. Friday, February 2. A revised draft of The Road essay #1 opening ¶ uploaded to peegrade assignment 2-2-18 Revised opening ¶, The Road essay #1. 50-point participation grade.

Sunday, February 4 by 22:00. Peergrade, 2-4-18 Revised opening ¶, The Road essay #1 A 50-point participation grade.

Tuesday, February 6 by 15:30. The Road essay #1 revision due to turnitin and Peergrade assignment 2-6-18, The Road essay #1 revision. A 100-point essay grade. Give your essay more focus on one central and sustained topic; more wfe; stronger opening and closing ¶s; use ¶ hooks. Feel emboldened to use any new information from the novel to enrich your thinking. .

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Writing instruction today in class. Focus, wfe.

Tonight. Complete drafting revised opening ¶ for The Road essay #1 revision. Upload to peegrade assignment 2-2-18 Revised opening ¶.

Ongoing. Friday, February 2. A revised draft of The Road essay #1 opening ¶ uploaded to peegrade assignment 2-4-18 Revised opening ¶, The Road essay #1. 50-point participation grade.

Sunday, February 4 by 22:00. Peergrade, 2-4-18 Revised opening ¶, The Road essay #1 A 50-point participation grade.

Tuesday, February 6 by 15:30. The Road essay #1 revision due to turnitin and Peergrade assignment 2-6-18, The Road essay #1 revision. A 100-point essay grade. Give your essay more focus on one central and sustained topic; more wfe; stronger opening and closing ¶s; use ¶ hooks. Feel emboldened to use any new information from the novel to enrich your thinking. .

 

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Writing instruction today in class. Have your revised opening ¶ ready to upload.

Tonight. Read The Road pages 168-189. Prepare your own thoughts and review these questions. Come prepared to engage in thoughtful and animated discussion.

Sunday, February 4 by 22:00. Peergrade, 2-4-18 Revised opening ¶, The Road essay #1 A 50-point participation grade.

Tuesday, February 6 by 15:30. The Road essay #1 revision due to turnitin and Peergrade assignment 2-6-18, The Road essay #1 revision. A 100-point essay grade. Give your essay more focus on one central and sustained topic; more wfe; stronger opening and closing ¶s; use ¶ hooks. Feel emboldened to use any new information from the novel to enrich your thinking.
 

The Road
reading links

reader's guide from publisher
scariest passage in all literature? (spoilers)
NYT review (spoilers)
review by James Wood (spoilers)
Darkness by Lord Byron
McCarthy on the origin of language
McCarthy's biography
Psychological power of storytelling
Selected scholarly articles on The Road
Finding meaning in life
The Road vocabulary lists
List of The Road reading questions
D
iscussion guidelines and reading schedule
 

 

Cormac McCarthy speaks
to Oprah Winfrey

 

 

The quest for God in The Road

 

 

The Road
Alan Warner

"We can divide the contemporary American novel into two traditions, or two social classes. The Tough Guy tradition comes up from Fenimore Cooper, with a touch of Poe, through Melville, Faulkner and Hemingway.
     "The Savant tradition comes from Hawthorne, especially through Henry James, Edith Wharton and Scott Fitzgerald. You could argue that the latter is liberal, east coast/New York, while the Tough Guys are gothic, reactionary, nihilistic, openly religious, southern or fundamentally rural. The Savants' blood line (curiously unrepresentative of Americans generally) has gained undoubted ascendancy in the literary firmament of the US. Upper middle class, urban and cosmopolitan, they or their own species review themselves. The current Tough Guys are a murder of great, hopelessly masculine, undomesticated writers, whose critical reputations have been and still are today cruelly divergent, adrift and largely unrewarded compared to the contemporary Savant school. In literature as in American life, success must be total and contrasted 'failure' fatally dispiriting.      "But in both content and technical riches, the Tough Guys are the true legislators of tortured American souls. They could include novelists Thomas McGuane, William Gaddis, Barry Hannah, Leon Rooke, Harry Crews, Jim Harrison, Mark Richard, James Welch and Denis Johnson. Cormac McCarthy is granddaddy to them all. New York critics may prefer their perfidy to be ignored, comforting themselves with the superlatives for All the Pretty Horses, but we should remember that the history of Cormac McCarthy and his achievement is not an American dream but near on 30 years of neglect for a writer who, since The Orchard Keeper in 1965, produced only masterworks in elegant succession. Now he has given us his great American nightmare.      "The Road is a novel of transforming power and formal risk. Abandoning gruff but profound male camaraderie, McCarthy instead sounds the limits of imaginable love and despair between a diligent father and his timid young son, 'each other's world entire'. The initial experience of the novel is sobering and oppressive, its final effect is emotionally shattering.
     "All the modern novel can do is done here. After the great historical fictions of the American west, Blood Meridian and The Border Trilogy, The Road is no artistic pinnacle for McCarthy but instead a masterly reclamation of those midnight-black, gothic worlds of Outer Dark (1968) and the similarly terrifying but beautiful Child of God (1973). How will this vital novel be positioned in today's America by Savants, Tough Guys or worse? Could its nightmare vistas reinforce those in the US who are determined to manipulate its people into believing that terror came into being only in 2001? This text, in its fragility, exists uneasily within such ill times. It's perverse that the scorched earth which The Road depicts often brings to mind those real apocalypses of southern Iraq beneath black oil smoke, or New Orleans—vistas not unconnected with the contemporary American regime."

Assignments due
read them in full


Wednesday, January 31. Vocab. quiz The Road list 3.

Friday, February 2. A revised draft of The Road essay #1 opening ¶ uploaded to peegrade assignment 2-4-18 Revised opening ¶, The Road essay #1. 50-point participation grade.

Sunday, February 4 by 22:00. Peergrade, 2-4-18 Revised opening ¶, The Road essay #1 A 50-point participation grade.

Tuesday, February 6 by 15:30. The Road essay #1 revision due to turnitin and Peergrade assignment 2-6-18, The Road essay #1 revision. A 100-point essay grade. Give your essay more focus on one central and sustained topic; more wfe; stronger opening and closing ¶s; use ¶ hooks. Feel emboldened to use any new information from the novel to enrich your thinking.

Sunday, February 11 by 22:00. Peergrade, 2-4-18, The Road essay #1 revision. A 100-point participation grade.

 

 

The next book you need

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
LBH sentences crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Comma usage quick guide
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good quesstions
MLA style center

 

 

From McCarthy's other works

"You never know what worse luck your bad luck has saved you from." No Country For Old Men

"I got what I needed instead of what I wanted and that's just about the best kind of luck you can have." The Sunset Limited

"The point is there ain't no point." No Country For Old Men

"The man who believes that the secrets of the world are forever hidden lives in mystery and fear. Superstition will drag him down." Blood Meridian

"The world is quite ruthless in selecting between the dream and the reality, even where we will not." All The Pretty Horses

"People complain about the bad things that happen to em that they don't deserve but they seldom mention the good. About what they done to deserve them things" No Country for Old Men

"It is personal. That's what an education does. It makes the world personal." The Sunset Limited

"In the end we all come to be cured of our sentiments." All the Pretty Horses

"Love makes men foolish." Cities of the Plain

"If a man's at odds to know his own mind it's because he hasn't got aught but his mind to know it with." Blood Meridian

"Those who cannot see must rely upon what has gone before. If I do not wish to appear so foolish as to drink from an empty glass I must remember whether I have drained it or not." Cities of the Plain

"You always pay too much. Particularly for promises. There aint no such thing as a bargain promise." No Country for Old Men

January 22-26

Monday

 

 

 


 

Today. Calvin and Chris lead our discussion of The Road pages 90-113.

Exploratory writing for The Road essay #1 due today by 15:30.

Be acquiring our next book. Details in middle column.

Tonight. Read The Road pages 114-130. Prepare your own thoughts and review these questions. Come prepared to engage in thoughtful and animated discussion.

Begin planning for The Road essay #1. Review Trimble Chapters 1, 2, 3, and 5. A quick review should do. Pay special attention to Chapters 3 & 5 about writing opening and closing ¶s.

For the essay, I'll be looking for a TH that offers an insight into theme from evidence; for WFE, elaboration working from evidence to show your thinking; for ¶ hooks (document here); for an engaging opening ¶ and closing ¶ (Use the models in Trimble Chapters 3 & 5.); and for an interesting engagment with the topic. Be interesting.

Ongoing. The Road essay #1, in class Thursday and Friday January 25 & 26. See assignment details here.

 

 

Tuesday

 

 

 


 

Today. Scott and Jack lead our discussion of The Road 114-130.

Tonight. Study for tomorrow's vocab quiz, The Road list 2, pages 34-97. Sentences might or might not come from the novel. Vocabulary lists now linked under The Road reading links in right column.

Begin more extensive planning for The Road essay. Take what I've marked or what you've already seen as a good idea from your exploratory writing. What question or questions does the idea raise? Which is most interesting to you? Make a list of evidence that addresses your question. How does that evidence shape your thinking? What do you have to say about that topic? Write a TH.

Ongoing. The Road essay #1, in class Thursday and Friday January 25 & 26. See assignment details here.

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Vocab. quiz The Road list 2. Here are zipgrade ids.

Degen exercise page 163 due today in class. Handwrite them.

Tonight. Take the beginning TH you wrote and the list of evidence you created and begin outlining an essay by topics/examples. Begin to break free of the 5-¶ model essay and to really think about the evidence and where it leads you. Your outline might be a list of what you want to show about your TH, with the illustrating evidence beneath each item.

Ongoing. The Road essay #1, in class Thursday and Friday January 25 & 26. See assignment details here.

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. The Road essay #1 in class today. Your goal is to write a draft based on your essay.

Tonight. Peergrade The Road essay #1 due by 22:00. Continue work on The Road essay #1.

Ongoing. The Road essay #1, in class Thursday and Friday January 25 & 26. See assignment details here.

 

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. The Road essay #1 by the end of class. I'll be looking for a TH that offers an insight into theme from evidence; for WFE, elaboration working from evidence to show your thinking; for ¶ hooks (document here); for an engaging opening ¶ and closing ¶. Use the models in Trimble

Tonight. Read The Road pages 131-144. Prepare your own thoughts and review these questions. Come prepared to engage in thoughtful and animated discussion. I would also like you to read this article about finding meaning in life from bigthink. See if it applies to The Road.

Ongoing. Sunday, January 28 by 22:00. Peergrade, The Road essay #1. A 100-point participation grade.
 

The Road
reading links

reader's guide from publisher
scariest passage in all literature? (spoilers)
NYT review (spoilers)
review by James Wood (spoilers)
Darkness by Lord Byron
McCarthy on the origin of language
McCarthy's biography
Psychological power of storytelling
Selected scholarly articles on The Road
Finding meaning in life
The Road vocabulary lists
List of The Road reading questions
D
iscussion guidelines and reading schedule
 

 

Cormac McCarthy speaks
to Oprah Winfrey

 

 

The quest for God in The Road

 

 

The Road
Alan Warner

"We can divide the contemporary American novel into two traditions, or two social classes. The Tough Guy tradition comes up from Fenimore Cooper, with a touch of Poe, through Melville, Faulkner and Hemingway.
     "The Savant tradition comes from Hawthorne, especially through Henry James, Edith Wharton and Scott Fitzgerald. You could argue that the latter is liberal, east coast/New York, while the Tough Guys are gothic, reactionary, nihilistic, openly religious, southern or fundamentally rural. The Savants' blood line (curiously unrepresentative of Americans generally) has gained undoubted ascendancy in the literary firmament of the US. Upper middle class, urban and cosmopolitan, they or their own species review themselves. The current Tough Guys are a murder of great, hopelessly masculine, undomesticated writers, whose critical reputations have been and still are today cruelly divergent, adrift and largely unrewarded compared to the contemporary Savant school. In literature as in American life, success must be total and contrasted 'failure' fatally dispiriting.      "But in both content and technical riches, the Tough Guys are the true legislators of tortured American souls. They could include novelists Thomas McGuane, William Gaddis, Barry Hannah, Leon Rooke, Harry Crews, Jim Harrison, Mark Richard, James Welch and Denis Johnson. Cormac McCarthy is granddaddy to them all. New York critics may prefer their perfidy to be ignored, comforting themselves with the superlatives for All the Pretty Horses, but we should remember that the history of Cormac McCarthy and his achievement is not an American dream but near on 30 years of neglect for a writer who, since The Orchard Keeper in 1965, produced only masterworks in elegant succession. Now he has given us his great American nightmare.      "The Road is a novel of transforming power and formal risk. Abandoning gruff but profound male camaraderie, McCarthy instead sounds the limits of imaginable love and despair between a diligent father and his timid young son, 'each other's world entire'. The initial experience of the novel is sobering and oppressive, its final effect is emotionally shattering.
     "All the modern novel can do is done here. After the great historical fictions of the American west, Blood Meridian and The Border Trilogy, The Road is no artistic pinnacle for McCarthy but instead a masterly reclamation of those midnight-black, gothic worlds of Outer Dark (1968) and the similarly terrifying but beautiful Child of God (1973). How will this vital novel be positioned in today's America by Savants, Tough Guys or worse? Could its nightmare vistas reinforce those in the US who are determined to manipulate its people into believing that terror came into being only in 2001? This text, in its fragility, exists uneasily within such ill times. It's perverse that the scorched earth which The Road depicts often brings to mind those real apocalypses of southern Iraq beneath black oil smoke, or New Orleans—vistas not unconnected with the contemporary American regime."

Assignments due
read them in full


Wednesday, Jan. 24. Vocab. quiz The Road list 2.

Monday, January 22. Your exploratory writing for The Road essay #1 to turnitin assignment 1-22-18, The Road exploratory writing by 15:30. Copy/Paste the topic before the writing. See details on The Road essay assignment. This writing is a 50-point participation grade.

Thursday, January 25. Peergrade, The Road essay #1 by 22:00. A 100-point participation grade.

Friday, January 26. The Road essay #1. See assignment details here. Read the document in its entirety. I'll be looking for a TH that offers an insight into theme from evidence; for WFE, elaboration working from evidence to show your thinking; for ¶ hooks (document here); for an engaging opening ¶ and closing ¶ (Use the models in Trimble Chapters 3 & 5.); and for an interesting engagment with the topic. Be interesting.

Sunday, January 28 by 22:00. Peergrade, The Road essay #1. A 100-point participation grade.

 

 

The next book you need

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
LBH sentences crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Comma usage quick guide
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good quesstions
MLA style center

 

 

From McCarthy's other works

"You never know what worse luck your bad luck has saved you from." No Country For Old Men

"I got what I needed instead of what I wanted and that's just about the best kind of luck you can have." The Sunset Limited

"The point is there ain't no point." No Country For Old Men

"The man who believes that the secrets of the world are forever hidden lives in mystery and fear. Superstition will drag him down." Blood Meridian

"The world is quite ruthless in selecting between the dream and the reality, even where we will not." All The Pretty Horses

"People complain about the bad things that happen to em that they don't deserve but they seldom mention the good. About what they done to deserve them things" No Country for Old Men

"It is personal. That's what an education does. It makes the world personal." The Sunset Limited

"In the end we all come to be cured of our sentiments." All the Pretty Horses

"Love makes men foolish." Cities of the Plain

"If a man's at odds to know his own mind it's because he hasn't got aught but his mind to know it with." Blood Meridian

"Those who cannot see must rely upon what has gone before. If I do not wish to appear so foolish as to drink from an empty glass I must remember whether I have drained it or not." Cities of the Plain

"You always pay too much. Particularly for promises. There aint no such thing as a bargain promise." No Country for Old Men

January 15-19

Monday

 

 

 


 

Today. No classes MLK holiday

Tonight.

Ongoing.

 

Tuesday

 

 

 


 

Today. The Road 26-46.

Tonight. Study for tomorrow's vocab quiz, The Road list 2, pages 34-97. Sentences might or might not come from the novel. Vocabulary lists now linked under The Road reading links in right column.

Ongoing. Monday, January 22. Your exploratory writing for The Road essay #1 to turnitin assignment 1-22-18, The Road exploratory writing by 15:30. Copy/Paste the topic before the writing. See details on The Road essay assignment. This writing is a 50-point participation grade

The Road essay #1, in class Thursday and Friday January 25 & 26. See assignment details here. Review writing instruction from last semester.

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Vocab. quiz The Road list 2. Here are zipgrade ids.

Degen exercise page 163 due today in class. Handwrite them.

Tonight. Read The Road pages 47-69. Prepare your own thoughts and review these questions. Come prepared to engage in thoughtful and animated discussion.

Ongoing. Monday, January 22. Your exploratory writing for The Road essay #1 to turnitin assignment 1-22-18, The Road exploratory writing by 15:30. Copy/Paste the topic before the writing. See details on The Road essay assignment. This writing is a 50-point participation grade

The Road essay #1, in class Thursday and Friday January 25 & 26. See assignment details here. Review writing instruction from last semester.

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Langston and Mark lead our discussion of The Road 47-69.

Tonight. Read The Road pages 70-89. Prepare your own thoughts and review these questions. Come prepared to engage in thoughtful and animated discussion.

Now that the first round of discussions are done, some observations:

1) Know what you think is central in your chapters, what topic is key. That key topic is the focus of the discussion, at least to begin. Discussions can digress a lot and loss focus. Try not to let that happen.

2) Find the passage you think most richly addresses that key topic. Begin with the passage. Have someone read it, then ask us questions about the passage, using those questions to branch out.

3) Interact with students, ask follow up questions; challenge, etc. Don't let students just make a statement then move to another student. Link student responses to the key issue.

4) Preparation. Leading a discussion is tough. You need to know everything about your section and the novel, to have its facts ready to hand so that you can take us to a key passage, add a passage, challenge a student response, etc. Don't underestimate the need for thorough and deep preparation. Begin by making a list of passages that illustrate your key topic. Know what you want us to understand.

5) Try to bring us to clear and full understanding of your key issue by the end of class, a wrap up.

6) Take us to the text. Take us to the text. Take us to the text. Always and ever.

Ongoing. Monday, January 22. Your exploratory writing for The Road essay #1 to turnitin assignment 1-22-18, The Road exploratory writing by 15:30. Copy/Paste the topic before the writing. See details on The Road essay assignment. This writing is a 50-point participation grade

The Road essay #1, in class Thursday and Friday January 25 & 26. See assignment details here. Review writing instruction from last semester.

 

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Tyler and Gabe lead our discussion of The Road 70-89.

Tonight. Read The Road pages 90-113. Prepare your own thoughts and review these questions. Come prepared to engage in thoughtful and animated discussion.

Ongoing. Monday, January 22. Your exploratory writing for The Road essay #1 to turnitin assignment 1-22-18, The Road exploratory writing by 15:30. Copy/Paste the topic before the writing. See details on The Road essay assignment. This writing is a 50-point participation grade

The Road essay #1, in class Thursday and Friday January 25 & 26. See assignment details here. Review writing instruction from last semester.
 

The Road
reading links

reader's guide from publisher
scariest passage in all literature? (spoilers)
NYT review (spoilers)
review by James Wood (spoilers)
Darkness by Lord Byron
McCarthy on the origin of language
McCarthy's biography
Psychological power of storytelling
Selected scholarly articles on The Road
The Road vocabulary lists
List of The Road reading questions
D
iscussion guidelines and reading schedule
 

 

Cormac McCarthy speaks
to Oprah Winfrey

 

 

The quest for God in The Road

 

 

The Road
Alan Warner

"We can divide the contemporary American novel into two traditions, or two social classes. The Tough Guy tradition comes up from Fenimore Cooper, with a touch of Poe, through Melville, Faulkner and Hemingway.
     "The Savant tradition comes from Hawthorne, especially through Henry James, Edith Wharton and Scott Fitzgerald. You could argue that the latter is liberal, east coast/New York, while the Tough Guys are gothic, reactionary, nihilistic, openly religious, southern or fundamentally rural. The Savants' blood line (curiously unrepresentative of Americans generally) has gained undoubted ascendancy in the literary firmament of the US. Upper middle class, urban and cosmopolitan, they or their own species review themselves. The current Tough Guys are a murder of great, hopelessly masculine, undomesticated writers, whose critical reputations have been and still are today cruelly divergent, adrift and largely unrewarded compared to the contemporary Savant school. In literature as in American life, success must be total and contrasted 'failure' fatally dispiriting.      "But in both content and technical riches, the Tough Guys are the true legislators of tortured American souls. They could include novelists Thomas McGuane, William Gaddis, Barry Hannah, Leon Rooke, Harry Crews, Jim Harrison, Mark Richard, James Welch and Denis Johnson. Cormac McCarthy is granddaddy to them all. New York critics may prefer their perfidy to be ignored, comforting themselves with the superlatives for All the Pretty Horses, but we should remember that the history of Cormac McCarthy and his achievement is not an American dream but near on 30 years of neglect for a writer who, since The Orchard Keeper in 1965, produced only masterworks in elegant succession. Now he has given us his great American nightmare.      "The Road is a novel of transforming power and formal risk. Abandoning gruff but profound male camaraderie, McCarthy instead sounds the limits of imaginable love and despair between a diligent father and his timid young son, 'each other's world entire'. The initial experience of the novel is sobering and oppressive, its final effect is emotionally shattering.
     "All the modern novel can do is done here. After the great historical fictions of the American west, Blood Meridian and The Border Trilogy, The Road is no artistic pinnacle for McCarthy but instead a masterly reclamation of those midnight-black, gothic worlds of Outer Dark (1968) and the similarly terrifying but beautiful Child of God (1973). How will this vital novel be positioned in today's America by Savants, Tough Guys or worse? Could its nightmare vistas reinforce those in the US who are determined to manipulate its people into believing that terror came into being only in 2001? This text, in its fragility, exists uneasily within such ill times. It's perverse that the scorched earth which The Road depicts often brings to mind those real apocalypses of southern Iraq beneath black oil smoke, or New Orleans—vistas not unconnected with the contemporary American regime."

Assignments due
read them in full


Wednesday, Jan. 10. Vocab. quiz The Road list 2.

Monday, January 22. Your exploratory writing for The Road essay #1 to turnitin assignment 1-22-18, The Road exploratory writing by 15:30. Copy/Paste the topic before the writing. See details on The Road essay assignment. This writing is a 50-point participation grade.

Friday, January 26. The Road essay. See assignment details here. Read the document in its entirety.

 

 

The Road reading journal

Since students are leading discussions and supplying questions for each reading section, your journal should include responses to those questions. All of them. Your reading journal becomes your concrete preparation for the day's class.
     I'd love to see you practicing B3 blending, writing sentences that include evidence and analysis of it. Doing that is a good way to improve your reading, your understanding, and your ability to communicate your ideas to other people, skills helpful in discussion and in writing.
     Let the journal, then, take the form of a simple notebook entry beginning with the day's pages underlined, then the question numbers and your responses. During the discussion, students and myself might call on you and ask for a response. If you don't have a good one prepared, then your daily participation grade will suffer, as it should.

 

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
LBH sentences crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Comma usage quick guide
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good quesstions
MLA style center

 

 

From McCarthy's other works

"You never know what worse luck your bad luck has saved you from." No Country For Old Men

"I got what I needed instead of what I wanted and that's just about the best kind of luck you can have." The Sunset Limited

"The point is there ain't no point." No Country For Old Men

"The man who believes that the secrets of the world are forever hidden lives in mystery and fear. Superstition will drag him down." Blood Meridian

"The world is quite ruthless in selecting between the dream and the reality, even where we will not." All The Pretty Horses

"People complain about the bad things that happen to em that they don't deserve but they seldom mention the good. About what they done to deserve them things" No Country for Old Men

"It is personal. That's what an education does. It makes the world personal." The Sunset Limited

"In the end we all come to be cured of our sentiments." All the Pretty Horses

"Love makes men foolish." Cities of the Plain

"If a man's at odds to know his own mind it's because he hasn't got aught but his mind to know it with." Blood Meridian

"Those who cannot see must rely upon what has gone before. If I do not wish to appear so foolish as to drink from an empty glass I must remember whether I have drained it or not." Cities of the Plain

"You always pay too much. Particularly for promises. There aint no such thing as a bargain promise." No Country for Old Men

 

 

A draft page from Blood Meridian

January 8-12

Monday

 

 

 


 

Today. A welcome, a review of policy and expectations and my new grading scheme, about being a second semester senior. How we'll do The Road. Writing on The Road, a 50-point quiz.

Tonight. Read The Road reading and student-led discussion schedule, beneath The Road reading links in right column, in its entirety. Know what's expected of you. Also, check for any conflicts with the day of your discussion—and know for certain what's written in red atop the schedule. See the revised The Road reading journal assignment in middle column.

Ongoing.

 

Tuesday

 

 

 


 

Today. The Road 3-13. Your questions, observations.

Tonight. Study for tomorrow's 25-point vocab quiz. Sentences might or might not come from the novel. Vocabulary lists now linked under The Road reading links in right column.

Ongoing.

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Vocab. quiz The Road list 1. Here are zipgrade ids.

Set The Road essay #1. See details beneath Assignments due in middle column.

Tonight. Read The Road pages 14-25.

Some questions for thought, reflection. Since I've written so many, you need choose only three for your journal.

     1) How does McCarthy describe the landscape? Note the details in his descriptions, the odd words, "cauterized," for example. Are you seeing a similarity in the details that describe the landscape and the world? List a few adjectives to characterize the world of The Road. What does McCarthy want us to know and to feel about that world?
     2) What's the tone of the book so far? The world is bleak. Is the tone? Is the narrator without hope? Are the characters?
     3) McCarthy's fond of sentences fragments. Why, do you think? Why a fragment instead of a full sentence?
     4) How does McCarthy describe and characterize the boy? What traits does he emphasize? What about him does he draw our attention to? Why?
      5) McCarthy's style is very often like poetry in its images, its sensory richness and the way it leads us to see familiar things in unfamiliar ways. Look at some imagery and some figurative language (similes and metaphors, for instance). Choose your favorite example and think about what it does.
     6) What is the relationship between man and nature? Is it only what seems most apparent, inimical?
     7) Much of this section is centered on the man. What does McCarthy want us to know about him? How does McCarthy shape our reactions to him? Do we admire him? Does he seem a good father? What are his struggles, his conflicts?
     8) What important places do the man and boy visit in this section? What's key about those places?
     9) How do the man and boy think about the past?
     10) What "progress" do the man and boy make in this section? Any significant advances or setbacks?

Ongoing.

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. The Road 14-25.

Tonight. See updates to The Road discussion guide and reading schedule.

Ongoing.

 

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. The Road 14-25.

Tonight. Read The Road 26-46 in preparation for our first discussion. Discussion leaders, use the assignment doc and know the expectations, requirements, and deadlines.

Complete the exercise about repeat and analysis modifiers in Degen, page 163. Write them on a sheet of paper for hand in. A 50-point quiz grade.

Ongoing.
 

The Road
reading links

reader's guide from publisher
scariest passage in all literature? (spoilers)
NYT review (spoilers)
review by James Wood (spoilers)
Darkness by Lord Byron
McCarthy on the origin of language
McCarthy's biography
Psychological power of storytelling
Selected scholarly articles on The Road
The Road vocabulary lists
List of The Road reading questions
D
iscussion guidelines and reading schedule
 

 

Cormac McCarthy speaks
to Oprah Winfrey

 

 

The quest for God in The Road

 

 

The Road
Alan Warner

"We can divide the contemporary American novel into two traditions, or two social classes. The Tough Guy tradition comes up from Fenimore Cooper, with a touch of Poe, through Melville, Faulkner and Hemingway.
     "The Savant tradition comes from Hawthorne, especially through Henry James, Edith Wharton and Scott Fitzgerald. You could argue that the latter is liberal, east coast/New York, while the Tough Guys are gothic, reactionary, nihilistic, openly religious, southern or fundamentally rural. The Savants' blood line (curiously unrepresentative of Americans generally) has gained undoubted ascendancy in the literary firmament of the US. Upper middle class, urban and cosmopolitan, they or their own species review themselves. The current Tough Guys are a murder of great, hopelessly masculine, undomesticated writers, whose critical reputations have been and still are today cruelly divergent, adrift and largely unrewarded compared to the contemporary Savant school. In literature as in American life, success must be total and contrasted 'failure' fatally dispiriting.      "But in both content and technical riches, the Tough Guys are the true legislators of tortured American souls. They could include novelists Thomas McGuane, William Gaddis, Barry Hannah, Leon Rooke, Harry Crews, Jim Harrison, Mark Richard, James Welch and Denis Johnson. Cormac McCarthy is granddaddy to them all. New York critics may prefer their perfidy to be ignored, comforting themselves with the superlatives for All the Pretty Horses, but we should remember that the history of Cormac McCarthy and his achievement is not an American dream but near on 30 years of neglect for a writer who, since The Orchard Keeper in 1965, produced only masterworks in elegant succession. Now he has given us his great American nightmare.      "The Road is a novel of transforming power and formal risk. Abandoning gruff but profound male camaraderie, McCarthy instead sounds the limits of imaginable love and despair between a diligent father and his timid young son, 'each other's world entire'. The initial experience of the novel is sobering and oppressive, its final effect is emotionally shattering.
     "All the modern novel can do is done here. After the great historical fictions of the American west, Blood Meridian and The Border Trilogy, The Road is no artistic pinnacle for McCarthy but instead a masterly reclamation of those midnight-black, gothic worlds of Outer Dark (1968) and the similarly terrifying but beautiful Child of God (1973). How will this vital novel be positioned in today's America by Savants, Tough Guys or worse? Could its nightmare vistas reinforce those in the US who are determined to manipulate its people into believing that terror came into being only in 2001? This text, in its fragility, exists uneasily within such ill times. It's perverse that the scorched earth which The Road depicts often brings to mind those real apocalypses of southern Iraq beneath black oil smoke, or New Orleans—vistas not unconnected with the contemporary American regime."

Assignments due
read them in full


Monday, January 8. 50-point quiz The Road, initial thoughts due to turnitin assignment 1-8-18, The Road, What's interesting and why/how? by end of class.

Wednesday, Jan. 10. Vocab. quiz The Road list 1.

Monday, January 22. Your exploratory writing for The Road essay #1 to turnitin assignment 1-22-18, The Road exploratory writing by 15:30. opy/Paste the topic before the writing. See details on The Road essay assignmen. This writing is a 50-point participation grade. .

Friday, January 26. The Road essay. See assignment details here. Read the document in its entirety.

 

 

The Road reading journal

Since students are leading discussions and supplying questions for each reading section, your journal should include responses to those questions. All of them. Your reading journal becomes your concrete preparation for the day's class.
     I'd love to see you practicing B3 blending, writing sentences that include evidence and analysis of it. Doing that is a good way to improve your reading, your understanding, and your ability to communicate your ideas to other people, skills helpful in discussion and in writing.
     Let the journal, then, take the form of a simple notebook entry beginning with the day's pages underlined, then the question numbers and your responses. During the discussion, students and myself might call on you and ask for a response. If you don't have a good one prepared, then your daily participation grade will suffer, as it should.

 

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
LBH sentences crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Comma usage quick guide
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good quesstions
MLA style center