English 4 fall archive

December 4-8

Monday

tolstoy13 

 

 


 

Today. Introduce writing opening ¶s. Trimble.

Join English 4 2018 class at Quizlet. I'll use it from now on for vocab., etc.

Discuss Candide through Chapter 18. If you've not already done so, read through the Candide essay assignment in full. Choose a topic and read the rest of the novel through the lens of that topic. Be thinking about the novel according to your topic, finding evidence, developing ideas, thinking about possible ways to focus the essay, possible TH, etc. Read with a clear purpose. Use your journal to give that purpose expression.

Tonight. Read Candide Chapters 19-21.
     Additional journal questions to choose from:
Chapter 19
     1) Candide finally seems to break with Pangloss's optimisim when he see the negro. Why?
     2) Candide seems very much changed now. How? Has experience taught him anything of value?
     3) Curiously, have rejected Pangloss as teacher, Candide seeks a replacement. Whom does he choose and what does the choice tell us about Candide?

Chapter 20
     1) What does ¶ 2 suggest about why we adopt philosophical beliefs? What is philosophical thinking and its value then? Is philosophy little more than motivated reasoning? Watch this video to learn more about motivated reasoning.


     2) Martin's Manicheanism defines yet another philosophical way of looking at the world. Is it any better than the others at explaining the presence of physical and moral evil? Consier the ships and the sheep.)

Chapter 21
     1) Volatire now brings us to Paris, the cultural capital of Europe, and, perhaps, a kind of old world Eldorado. What is Parisian culture like?
     2) Explain the final sentence. What does Voltaire want us to notice?      

Ongoing. Candide TH, outline, and opening ¶ due Monday, December 11. A participation grade. Candide essay due Thursday, December 14. Your final exam. See details on assignment page.

 

 

Tuesday

chekov14 

 

 


 

Today. Discuss Candide through Chapter 21.

Tonight. Read Candide Chapters 22-24.
     Additional journal questions to choose from:
Chapter 22
     1) Contrast Paris and Eldorado—the people, the institutions, the aims and character of society, Parisian values, etc. What is Voltaire's point?

Chapter 23
     1) Why does Candide refuse to set foot in England? How has Candide changed?

Chapter 24
     1) Why does Candide sink into "a dark melancholy" (66)? What does Candide expect from the world?
     2) How has Candide maintained his optimism despite his experience?

Ongoing. Candide TH, outline, and opening ¶ due Monday, December 11. A participation grade. Candide essay due Thursday, December 14. Your final exam. See details on assignment page.

 

 

Wednesday

chinuaachebecolor11 

 

 

 

 

Today. Discuss Candide through Chapter 24.

Tonight. Read Candide Chapters 25-28.
     Additional journal questions to choose from.
Chapter 25
     1) What is the meaning of Pococurante's name? Ironic?
     2) Why do you think Voltaire places the visit to Pococurante immediately after the scene with Paquette and Bro. Giroflee?
     3) What makes us happy? Can we be happy? Think back through the novel.

Chapters 26-28
     1) These Chapters have always struck me as mere repeats of earlier themes. Do you see Voltaire adding anything new?

Ongoing. Candide TH, outline, and opening ¶ due Monday, December 11. A participation grade. Candide essay due Thursday, December 14. Your final exam. See details on assignment page.

 

 

Thursday

neruda14 

 

 

 

 

Today. Discuss Candide through Chapter 28.

Tonight. Read Candide Chapters 29-30.
     Additional journal questions to choose from.
Chapters 29 & 30
     1) The farm is the third of the novel's three "gardens." Compare them. In which if any can we attain happiness?
     2) Sum up the novel's lesson in one sentence.

Ongoing. Candide TH, outline, and opening ¶ due Monday, December 11. A participation grade. Candide essay due Thursday, December 14. Your final exam. See details on assignment page.

 

 

Friday

wislawasymborska11 

 

 

 

 

Today. Discuss Candide through Chapter 30.

Tonight. Candide TH and outline due Monday. A participation grade.

Ongoing. Candide TH, outline, and opening ¶ due Monday, December 11. Candide essay due Thursday, December 14. Your final exam. See details on assignment page.
 

Candide
reading links

candide9

Satire by David Mikics
Satire, key intentions, techniques
Parody, Satire by Edward Hirsch
Changing nature of satire
Bildungsroman by David Mikics
Study questions from Auburn U
Alexander Pope's Essay on Man
Gustave Flaubert on Voltaire
Volaire from SEP
On the Lisbon Earthquake
Toleration, Virtue by Voltaire

 

 

Leibniz on the Problem of Evil
from Stanford Encyclopedia
of Philosophy

7.2 Optimism
How can this world be the best of all possible worlds? After all, as Voltaire brought out so clearly in Candide, it certainly seems that this world, in which one finds no short supply of natural and moral horrors, is far from perfect—indeed, it seems pretty lousy. Certainly only a fool could believe that it is the best world possible. But, Leibniz speaks on behalf of the fool, with an argument that has essentially the following structure:
(1) God is omnipotent and omniscient and benevolent and the free creator of the world. (Definition)
(2) Things could have been otherwise—i.e., there are other possible worlds. (Premise)
(3) Suppose this world is not the best of all possible worlds. (I.e., The world could be better.)
(4) If this world is not the best of all possible worlds, then at least one of the following must be the case: God was not powerful enough to bring about a better world; or God did not know how this world would develop after his creation of it (i.e. God lacked foreknowledge); or God did not wish this world to be the best; or God did not create the world; or there were no other possible worlds from which God could choose.
(5) But, any one or more of the disjuncts of (4) contradicts (1) or (2).
(6) Therefore, this world is the best of all possible worlds.
     In other words, Leibniz seems to argue that, if one is to hold the traditional theistic conception of God and believe that one can meaningfully assert that the world could have been other than it is, then one must hold that this world is the best possible. Naturally, this argument is simply the Christian retort to the Epicurean argument against theism.
     But what are the criteria by which one can say that this world is the best? It should be clear that Leibniz nowhere says that this argument implies that everything has to be wonderful. Indeed, Leibniz is squarely in the tradition of all Christian apologists going back to Augustine, arguing that we cannot have knowledge of the whole of the world and that even if a piece of the mosaic that is discoverable to us is ugly the whole may indeed have great beauty. Still, Leibniz does offer at least two considerations relevant to the determination of the happiness and perfection of the world. He tells us in the Discourse on Metaphysics, first, that the happiness of minds is the principal aim of God (A VI iv 1537/AG 38) and, second, that God has chosen the most perfect world, that is, the one which is at the same time the simplest in hypotheses and the richest in phenomena. (A VI iv 1538/AG 39) So, is this world of genocide and natural disaster better than a world containing only one multifoliate rose? Yes, because the former is a world in which an infinity of minds perceive and reflect on the diversity of phenomena caused by a modest number of simple laws. To the more difficult question whether there is a better world with perhaps a little less genocide and natural disaster Leibniz can only respond that, if so, God would have brought it into actuality. And this, of course, is to say that there really is no better possible world.

 

 

Satire
from A Poet's Glossary
by Edward Hirsch

"Satire is essentially moral. Its fundamental mode is earnest joking, kidding on the square, improving society by attacking villains and fools. The editor of The Oxford Book of Satirical Verse (1980) notes, 'One can say gravely that satire postulates an ideal condition of man or decency, and then despairs of it; and enjoys the despair, masochistically. But the joke must not be lost—the joke of statement, of sound, of rhythm, form, vocabulary, rhyme, and surprise. Without the joke everything goes; and we may be left only with complaint, invective, or denunciation; all of which may be poetry, but of another kind.'"

 

 

From The Philosophical Dictionary
Virtue

"What is virtue? Beneficence towards the fellow-creature. Can I call virtue things other than those which do me good? I am needy, you are generous. I am in danger, you help me. I am deceived, you tell me the truth. I am neglected, you console me. I am ignorant, you teach me. Without difficulty I shall call you virtuous. But what will become of the cardinal and divine virtues? Some of them will remain in the schools.
     "What does it matter to me that you are temperate? you observe a precept of health; you will have better health, and I am happy to hear it. You have faith and hope, and I am happy still; they will procure you eternal life. Your divine virtues are celestial gifts; your cardinal virtues are excellent qualities which serve to guide you : but they are not virtues as regards your fellow-creature. The prudent man does good to himself, the virtuous man does good to mankind. St. Paul was right to tell you that charity prevails over faith and hope.
     "But shall only those that are useful to one's fellow-creature be admitted as virtues? How can I admit any others? We live in society; really, therefore, the only things that are good for us are those that are good for society. A recluse will be sober, pious; he will be clad in hair-cloth; he will be a saint: but I shall not call him virtuous until he has done some act of virtue by which other men have profited. So long as he is alone, he is doing neither good nor evil; for us he is nothing. If St. Bruno brought peace to families, if he succoured want, he was virtuous; if he fasted, prayed in solitude, he was a saint. Virtue among men is an interchange of kindness; he who has no part in this interchange should not be counted. If this saint were in the world, he would doubtless do good; but so long as he is not in the world, the world will be right in refusing him the title of virtuous; he will be good for himself and not for us.
     "But, you say to me, if a recluse is a glutton, a drunkard, given to secret debauches with himself, he is vicious; he is virtuous, therefore, if he has the Opposite qualities. That is what I cannot agree : he is a very disagreeable fellow if he has the faults you mention; but he is not vicious, wicked, punishable as regards society to whom these infamies do no harm. It is to be presumed that were he to return to society he would do harm there, that he would be very vicious; and it is even more probable that he would be a wicked man, than it is sure that the other temperate and chaste recluse would be a virtuous man, for in society faults increase, and good qualities diminish.
     "A much stronger objection is made; Nero, Pope Alexander VI., and other monsters of this species, have bestowed kindnesses; I answer hardily that on that day they were virtuous.
     "A few theologians say that the divine emperor Antonine was not virtuous; that he was a stubborn Stoic who, not content with commanding men, wished further to be esteemed by them; that he attributed to himself the good he did to the human race; that all his life he was just, laborious, beneficent through vanity, and that lie only deceived men through his virtues. " My God ! " I exclaim. " Give us often rogues like him !"

Assignments due
read them in full

stephenkingworking10


Monday, December 11. Thesis, outline, and opening ¶ for Candide essay, ready to be uploaded to Peergrade in class. We will spend Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday working on the Candide essay. Take full advantage of this opportunity to write the best essay you can. For Monday, you might well have a rough draft based on TH and outline already written. A participation grade.

Thursday, December 14. Candide essay due. No paper copy. Upload to Candide essay assignment at both Peergrade and Turnitin. Details on this assignment page. Think of this essay as your final exam.

 

 

Have The Road ready to go
during Christmas break

theroadcover
 

 

Candide reading journal
what your journal should look like

   While we read Candide, you will keep a reading journal, a formal record of your responses to the novel. Use a notebook/notebook section dedicated to this journal. Your journal must be handwritten.
     For each day's reading, you will make a simple list of what the reading satirizes (human foibles, social, political, or religious practices, etc.); respond to at least two questions from the Study questions from Auburn U link posted under Candide reading links in the right column; identify at least two examples of the techniques of satire, with examples; and write at least one question of your own. You might also include short summaries of the reading; key plot points; examples of the novel using the elements of fiction; key quotations; and personal insights/reflections. The journal should prove valuable as you read and when you come to write about the novel.
     Your journal will have two columns, the left one for the questions, the right one for your responses to those questions. Your responses are to be evidence based—that is they must include quotations from the novel and your insights about them, including at least one B3-blended sentence. Think of these responses as practice in WFE.
     I expect responses that approximate TH/TS quality thinking. I will be checking your journal regularly for a quiz grade.
     Some big questions to focus on:
1. What are the sources/causes of evil/suffering?
2. What are the best/right responses to that evil/suffering? What is to be done about evil/suffering?.
3. What is Candide's attitude and understanding of the world and how/why does it change? How closely does he follow Pangloss's "philosophy"?
4. What changes Candide's attitude and understanding?
5. How does the novel use symmetry and parallelism as structuring and thematic devices?
6. Who are Candide's teachers and what are their teachings? What does the novel think about them and which if any of them is "correct"?

 

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
LBH sentences crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good quesstions
MLA style center

 

 

Candide
from In Our Time

 

 

From The Philosophical Dictionary
ways of having a false mind

1. By not examining if the principle is true, even when one deduces accurate consequences therefrom; and this way is common.

2. By drawing false consequences from a principle recognized as true. For example, a servant is asked if his master is in his room, by persons he suspects of wanting his life: if he were foolish enough to tell them the truth on the pretext that one must not lie, it is clear he would be drawing an absurd consequence from a very true principle.

A judge who would condemn a man who has killed his assassin, because homicide is forbidden, would be as iniquitous as he was poor reasoner.

Similar cases are subdivided in a thousand different gradations. The good mind, the just mind, is that which distinguishes them; whence comes that one has seen so many iniquitous judgments, not because the judges' hearts were bad, but because they were not sufficiently enlightened.

 

 

From Charles Simic

simic2

"What [poet Czeslaw Milosz] and his family were to experience in their lifetimes under the pressure of historical events was the fate of many other people, and it included the most important lesson—that good and evil are not some debatable religious or philosophical concepts, but things one learns to recognize daily like hunger and the taste of bread."

Might the same be said about Candide and company?

November 27-December 1

Monday

tolstoy12 

 

 


 

Today. Discuss Candide Chapters 9-11. Introduce Candide essay due Monday, December 18.

Tonight. Read Candide Chapter 12.Continue keeping your reading journal in the prescribed way.
     Additional journal questions to choose from.
     Chapter 12: 1) We've named human nature as one of the major contributors to moral and physical evil and to human suffering. In what ways does the old woman's nature contribute to evil and suffering? Define the human attitudes, desires, traits that contribute to evil and suffering.
     2) Do you see any tension in the old woman's attitude to her experience? Is she, say, still aristocratic?
     3) Find two good examples of irony in the Chapter and define how they contribute to the satire.
     4) Why the detail of the buttock? (which was first introduced in Chapter 10.)
     5) The old woman raises some hefty philosophical questions at Chapter's end. How does she answer them? How might you? Is the novel offering a philosophy of its own?

Ongoing. Satire essay due tomorrow. Paper copy in class, upload to Satire essay assignment at Peergrade and turnitin by 15:30. Assignment details in middle column. Read the entire assignment. Know the assignment's directions and expectations.

 

 

Tuesday

chekov13 

 

 


 

Today. Satire essay due today. Paper in class, upload to Satire essay assignment at both Peergrade and turnitin by 15:30.

Discuss Candide Chapter 12.

Tonight. Study for Vocab. Quiz, Candide 19-30. Use Quizlet to full advantage. Bonus to be a practice blended sentence.

Ongoing. Candide essay due Thursday, December 14.

 

 

Wednesday

chinuaachebecolor10 

 

 

 

 

Today. Vocab. Quiz, Candide 19-30.

Tonight. Read Candide Chapters 13-16. Continue keeping your reading journal in the prescribed way.
     Additional journal questions to choose from.
     Chapter 13: 1) Is the New World better than the Old? Is it, in fact, any different?
     2) The narrator uses the adjectives "good," "wise," and "prudent" to describe the old woman. Is she, in fact? Consider her lack of "scruple" when deciding how to respond to Don Fernando.
     3) As they're fleeing the port, Cacambo says to Candide, "'You're about to become the happiest man alive. How pleased Los Padres are going to be when they discover that a there's a captain coming that knows the Bulgar drill!'" (32). What is happiness in Candide and how does one attain it?
     Chapter 14: 1) The narrator tells us that Cacambo "loved his master very much, because his master was a very good man" (31). Is Candide a "very good man"? Why or why not? What makes a good man in this novel?
     2) Cacambo shows no qualm about shifting allegiance, now fighting for not against the Jesuits, since circumstanaces have changed. Should we be bothered by his ethical adaptability?
     3) What is Voltaire's attitude toward the Jesuits? Does that attitude have a basis in the Chapter?
     Chapter 15: 1) Cunégonde's brother now tells his story, quickly. Is it any different than Cunégondes or the old woman's?
     2) The confrontation between the brother and Candide dramatizes two ways of thinking about rights. Define the way presented by each character. Which does the novel seem to endorse?
     Chapter 16: 1) Candide, having killed his brother, claims he's too upset to eat. Is he right? What is Voltaire's point here?
     2) Candide "rescues" the two girls from the monkeys. What is Voltaire's point about what happens next?
     3) As he has all along, Candide receives some education here. What is the lesson he learns? What have been the lessons he's learned so far?
     4) The end of the Chapter shows us the principles men follow. Remember your Rosseau from government class?

Ongoing. Candide essay due Thursday, December 14.

 

 

Thursday

neruda13 

 

 

 

 

Today. Discuss Candide Chapters 13-16.

Tonight. Nothing. Open House.

Ongoing. Candide essay due Thursday, December 14.

 

 

Friday

wislawasymborska10 

 

 

 

 

Today. Continue discussing Candide.

Tonight. Read Candide Chapter 17-18. Continue keeping your Candide reading journal in the prescribed way.
     Additional questions to choose from.
     Chapter 17: 1) Eldorado is meant to be compared to Thunder-ten-tronckh. Do. How is Eldorado different? Is it, in fact, a paradise?
     2) Candide says that Eldorado "must be the place where all goes well" (42). Is he right? Why makes Eldorado that place?
     Chapter 18: 1) Remember the causes of physical and moral evil and of suffering. Are those causes present in Eldorado?
     2) Make a list of the Eldoradans we meet. How do they contrast people in the outer world? What makes them as they are?
     3) Why does Candide decide to leave Eldorado, the paradise on earth?

Ongoing. Sunday, December 3. Peergrade, Satire essay due by 22:00.

Candide essay due Thursday, December 14.
 

Candide
reading links

candide8

Satire by David Mikics
Satire, key intentions, techniques
Parody, Satire by Edward Hirsch
Changing nature of satire
Bildungsroman by David Mikics
Study questions from Auburn U
Alexander Pope's Essay on Man
Gustave Flaubert on Voltaire
Volaire from SEP
On the Lisbon Earthquake
Toleration, Virtue by Voltaire

 

 

Leibniz on the Problem of Evil
from Stanford Encyclopedia
of Philosophy

7.2 Optimism
How can this world be the best of all possible worlds? After all, as Voltaire brought out so clearly in Candide, it certainly seems that this world, in which one finds no short supply of natural and moral horrors, is far from perfect—indeed, it seems pretty lousy. Certainly only a fool could believe that it is the best world possible. But, Leibniz speaks on behalf of the fool, with an argument that has essentially the following structure:
(1) God is omnipotent and omniscient and benevolent and the free creator of the world. (Definition)
(2) Things could have been otherwise—i.e., there are other possible worlds. (Premise)
(3) Suppose this world is not the best of all possible worlds. (I.e., The world could be better.)
(4) If this world is not the best of all possible worlds, then at least one of the following must be the case: God was not powerful enough to bring about a better world; or God did not know how this world would develop after his creation of it (i.e. God lacked foreknowledge); or God did not wish this world to be the best; or God did not create the world; or there were no other possible worlds from which God could choose.
(5) But, any one or more of the disjuncts of (4) contradicts (1) or (2).
(6) Therefore, this world is the best of all possible worlds.
     In other words, Leibniz seems to argue that, if one is to hold the traditional theistic conception of God and believe that one can meaningfully assert that the world could have been other than it is, then one must hold that this world is the best possible. Naturally, this argument is simply the Christian retort to the Epicurean argument against theism.
     But what are the criteria by which one can say that this world is the best? It should be clear that Leibniz nowhere says that this argument implies that everything has to be wonderful. Indeed, Leibniz is squarely in the tradition of all Christian apologists going back to Augustine, arguing that we cannot have knowledge of the whole of the world and that even if a piece of the mosaic that is discoverable to us is ugly the whole may indeed have great beauty. Still, Leibniz does offer at least two considerations relevant to the determination of the happiness and perfection of the world. He tells us in the Discourse on Metaphysics, first, that the happiness of minds is the principal aim of God (A VI iv 1537/AG 38) and, second, that God has chosen the most perfect world, that is, the one which is at the same time the simplest in hypotheses and the richest in phenomena. (A VI iv 1538/AG 39) So, is this world of genocide and natural disaster better than a world containing only one multifoliate rose? Yes, because the former is a world in which an infinity of minds perceive and reflect on the diversity of phenomena caused by a modest number of simple laws. To the more difficult question whether there is a better world with perhaps a little less genocide and natural disaster Leibniz can only respond that, if so, God would have brought it into actuality. And this, of course, is to say that there really is no better possible world.

 

 

Satire
from A Poet's Glossary
by Edward Hirsch

"Satire is essentially moral. Its fundamental mode is earnest joking, kidding on the square, improving society by attacking villains and fools. The editor of The Oxford Book of Satirical Verse (1980) notes, 'One can say gravely that satire postulates an ideal condition of man or decency, and then despairs of it; and enjoys the despair, masochistically. But the joke must not be lost—the joke of statement, of sound, of rhythm, form, vocabulary, rhyme, and surprise. Without the joke everything goes; and we may be left only with complaint, invective, or denunciation; all of which may be poetry, but of another kind.'"

 

 

From The Philosophical Dictionary
Virtue

"What is virtue? Beneficence towards the fellow-creature. Can I call virtue things other than those which do me good? I am needy, you are generous. I am in danger, you help me. I am deceived, you tell me the truth. I am neglected, you console me. I am ignorant, you teach me. Without difficulty I shall call you virtuous. But what will become of the cardinal and divine virtues? Some of them will remain in the schools.
     "What does it matter to me that you are temperate? you observe a precept of health; you will have better health, and I am happy to hear it. You have faith and hope, and I am happy still; they will procure you eternal life. Your divine virtues are celestial gifts; your cardinal virtues are excellent qualities which serve to guide you : but they are not virtues as regards your fellow-creature. The prudent man does good to himself, the virtuous man does good to mankind. St. Paul was right to tell you that charity prevails over faith and hope.
     "But shall only those that are useful to one's fellow-creature be admitted as virtues? How can I admit any others? We live in society; really, therefore, the only things that are good for us are those that are good for society. A recluse will be sober, pious; he will be clad in hair-cloth; he will be a saint: but I shall not call him virtuous until he has done some act of virtue by which other men have profited. So long as he is alone, he is doing neither good nor evil; for us he is nothing. If St. Bruno brought peace to families, if he succoured want, he was virtuous; if he fasted, prayed in solitude, he was a saint. Virtue among men is an interchange of kindness; he who has no part in this interchange should not be counted. If this saint were in the world, he would doubtless do good; but so long as he is not in the world, the world will be right in refusing him the title of virtuous; he will be good for himself and not for us.
     "But, you say to me, if a recluse is a glutton, a drunkard, given to secret debauches with himself, he is vicious; he is virtuous, therefore, if he has the Opposite qualities. That is what I cannot agree : he is a very disagreeable fellow if he has the faults you mention; but he is not vicious, wicked, punishable as regards society to whom these infamies do no harm. It is to be presumed that were he to return to society he would do harm there, that he would be very vicious; and it is even more probable that he would be a wicked man, than it is sure that the other temperate and chaste recluse would be a virtuous man, for in society faults increase, and good qualities diminish.
     "A much stronger objection is made; Nero, Pope Alexander VI., and other monsters of this species, have bestowed kindnesses; I answer hardily that on that day they were virtuous.
     "A few theologians say that the divine emperor Antonine was not virtuous; that he was a stubborn Stoic who, not content with commanding men, wished further to be esteemed by them; that he attributed to himself the good he did to the human race; that all his life he was just, laborious, beneficent through vanity, and that lie only deceived men through his virtues. " My God ! " I exclaim. " Give us often rogues like him !"

Assignments due
read them in full

stephenkingworking9


Wednesday, November 29. Vocabulary Quiz, Candide 19-30. Bonus question will give you a quote and ask you to write a blended analytical sentence.

Tuesday, November 28. Satire essay. Here are the details. If ever an essay is to be enjoyed, if ever an essay hit you where you live, then this is that essay! Here's your chance to rail against what irks you. Grind your teeth. A full essay grade. Read the entire assignment. Know the assignment's directions and expectations.

Sunday, December 3, by 22:00. Peergrade, Satire essay. A participation grade.

Monday, December 4. The deadline for Crime and Punishment essay rewrites for grade replacement. See Policy page for details and requirements. Use this template exactly and this guide to writing an essay. Your essay must be at least four ¶s.

Thursday, December 14. Candide essay. Details on this assignment page.

 

Candide reading journal
what your journal should look like

   While we read Candide, you will keep a reading journal, a formal record of your responses to the novel. Use a notebook/notebook section dedicated to this journal. Your journal must be handwritten.
     For each day's reading, you will make a simple list of what the reading satirizes (human foibles, social, political, or religious practices, etc.); respond to at least two questions from the Study questions from Auburn U link posted under Candide reading links in the right column; identify at least two examples of the techniques of satire, with examples; and write at least one question of your own. You might also include short summaries of the reading; key plot points; examples of the novel using the elements of fiction; key quotations; and personal insights/reflections. The journal should prove valuable as you read and when you come to write about the novel.
     Your journal will have two columns, the left one for the questions, the right one for your responses to those questions. Your responses are to be evidence based—that is they must include quotations from the novel and your insights about them, including at least one B3-blended sentence. Think of these responses as practice in WFE.
     I expect responses that approximate TH/TS quality thinking. I will be checking your journal regularly for a quiz grade.
     Some big questions to focus on:
1. What are the sources/causes of evil/suffering?
2. What are the best/right responses to that evil/suffering? What is to be done about evil/suffering?.
3. What is Candide's attitude and understanding of the world and how/why does it change? How closely does he follow Pangloss's "philosophy"?
4. What changes Candide's attitude and understanding?
5. How does the novel use symmetry and parallelism as structuring and thematic devices?
6. Who are Candide's teachers and what are their teachings? What does the novel think about them and which if any of them is "correct"?

 

 

Candide vocabulary lists

Candide 19-30
zipgrade ids

 

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
LBH sentences crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good quesstions
MLA style center

 

 

Candide
from In Our Time

 

 

From The Philosophical Dictionary
ways of having a false mind

1. By not examining if the principle is true, even when one deduces accurate consequences therefrom; and this way is common.

2. By drawing false consequences from a principle recognized as true. For example, a servant is asked if his master is in his room, by persons he suspects of wanting his life: if he were foolish enough to tell them the truth on the pretext that one must not lie, it is clear he would be drawing an absurd consequence from a very true principle.

A judge who would condemn a man who has killed his assassin, because homicide is forbidden, would be as iniquitous as he was poor reasoner.

Similar cases are subdivided in a thousand different gradations. The good mind, the just mind, is that which distinguishes them; whence comes that one has seen so many iniquitous judgments, not because the judges' hearts were bad, but because they were not sufficiently enlightened.

 

 

From Charles Simic

simic1

"What [poet Czeslaw Milosz] and his family were to experience in their lifetimes under the pressure of historical events was the fate of many other people, and it included the most important lesson—that good and evil are not some debatable religious or philosophical concepts, but things one learns to recognize daily like hunger and the taste of bread."

Might the same be said about Candide and company?

November 13-17

Monday

tolstoy11 

 

 


 

Today. Discuss Candide Chapters 4 & 5. Introduce Satire essay assignment.

Tonight. Read Candide chapters 6-8. Continue keeping your Candide reading journal (CRJ) in the prescribed way. I will be checking it regularly. Each check a quiz grade. Journals not in proper form will receive a grade of 0.
     Additional questions to choose from.
     Chapter 6: 1) Explain Candide's outcry at the end of the chapter. Is he "quite sound in his judgment" (3)? How does Candide come to understand of the world? What clash is Voltaire dramatizing here?
     Chapter 7: 1) Define the old woman's responses to suffering. Do you see a competing philosophy to Pangloss's? Is the old woman virtuous? (You might read Voltaire's definition of virtue. See it at bottom of right column.) 2) Does the chapter show human nature as a cause of evil and suffering? Has the novel already shown human nature to be a great cause of evil and suffering?
     Chapter 8. 1) Has Cunégonde's experience changed her attitude and philosophical thinking? Is she now a philosopher? What, then, is philosophy to Voltaire?

Ongoing. Satire essay due Tuesday, November 28. Details in middle column. Read the entire assignment. Know the assignment's directions and expectations.

 

 

Tuesday

chekov12 

 

 


 

Today. Discuss Candide Chapters 6-8.

Tonight. Study for Vocab. Quiz, Candide 7-18.

Ongoing. Satire essay due Tuesday, November 28. Details in middle column. Read the entire assignment. Know the assignment's directions and expectations.

 

 

Wednesday

chinuaachebecolor9 

 

 

 

 

Today. Vocab. Quiz, Candide 7-18.

Tonight. Your choice.

Ongoing. Satire essay due Tuesday, November 28. Details in middle column. Read the entire assignment. Know the assignment's directions and expectations.

 

 

Thursday

neruda12 

 

 

 

 

Today. Discuss Candide Chapters 6-8.

Tonight. Read your Crime and Punishment essay. Follow the directions beneath the heading What to do with a returned essay on the Policy page. Begin making a list of errors so you can correct them next time.

Ongoing. Satire essay due Tuesday, November 28. Details in middle column.Read the entire assignment. Know the assignment's directions and expectations.

 

 

Friday

wislawasymborska9 

 

 

 

 

Today. Crime and Punishment essay grading notes. Essay rewrite for grade replacement.

Tonight. Read Candide Chapter 9-11. Continue keeping your Candide reading journal (CRJ) in the prescribed way. I will be checking it regularly. Each check a quiz grade. Journals not in proper form will receive a grade of 0.
     Additional questions to choose from.
 Chapter 9. 1) What does the narrator think of the old woman? Look at his descriptions of her. What do you see? Why might the narrator think of her that way? What about her informs the narrator's opinion? 2) How does the novel use plot for comedic and satirical purposes? Look at the sequence of events. What do you see? 3) Contrast Pangloss's philosophy to the old woman's. Which is the clearer and better? Note the grounds for your judgment of better. In what way or why better?
     Chapter 10. 1) How do Pangloss's ideas still inform Candide's way of thinking about the world? Find one example and comment. 2) Where does Cunégonde look for comfort in the midst of suffering? Have you seen a consistency in it? 3) Why does the old woman respond to Cunégonde's complaints? Why do they provoke her, do you think?      
     Chapter 11. 1) What is the world like according to the old woman's story? How is that depiction of the world fit for satire? 2) Where in the novel have we seen good? What is good for Voltaire? 3) Is the old woman's story funny? Why? Why would we laugh at her terrible misfortunes?

Ongoing. Satire essay due Tuesday, November 28. Details in middle column. Read the entire assignment. Know the assignment's directions and expectations.

Candide
reading links

candide7

Satire by David Mikics
Satire, key intentions, techniques
Parody, Satire by Edward Hirsch
Changing nature of satire
Bildungsroman by David Mikics
Study questions from Auburn U
Alexander Pope's Essay on Man
Gustave Flaubert on Voltaire
Volaire from SEP
On the Lisbon Earthquake
Toleration, Virtue by Voltaire

 

 

Leibniz on the Problem of Evil
from Stanford Encyclopedia
of Philosophy

7.2 Optimism
How can this world be the best of all possible worlds? After all, as Voltaire brought out so clearly in Candide, it certainly seems that this world, in which one finds no short supply of natural and moral horrors, is far from perfect—indeed, it seems pretty lousy. Certainly only a fool could believe that it is the best world possible. But, Leibniz speaks on behalf of the fool, with an argument that has essentially the following structure:
(1) God is omnipotent and omniscient and benevolent and the free creator of the world. (Definition)
(2) Things could have been otherwise—i.e., there are other possible worlds. (Premise)
(3) Suppose this world is not the best of all possible worlds. (I.e., The world could be better.)
(4) If this world is not the best of all possible worlds, then at least one of the following must be the case: God was not powerful enough to bring about a better world; or God did not know how this world would develop after his creation of it (i.e. God lacked foreknowledge); or God did not wish this world to be the best; or God did not create the world; or there were no other possible worlds from which God could choose.
(5) But, any one or more of the disjuncts of (4) contradicts (1) or (2).
(6) Therefore, this world is the best of all possible worlds.
     In other words, Leibniz seems to argue that, if one is to hold the traditional theistic conception of God and believe that one can meaningfully assert that the world could have been other than it is, then one must hold that this world is the best possible. Naturally, this argument is simply the Christian retort to the Epicurean argument against theism.
     But what are the criteria by which one can say that this world is the best? It should be clear that Leibniz nowhere says that this argument implies that everything has to be wonderful. Indeed, Leibniz is squarely in the tradition of all Christian apologists going back to Augustine, arguing that we cannot have knowledge of the whole of the world and that even if a piece of the mosaic that is discoverable to us is ugly the whole may indeed have great beauty. Still, Leibniz does offer at least two considerations relevant to the determination of the happiness and perfection of the world. He tells us in the Discourse on Metaphysics, first, that the happiness of minds is the principal aim of God (A VI iv 1537/AG 38) and, second, that God has chosen the most perfect world, that is, the one which is at the same time the simplest in hypotheses and the richest in phenomena. (A VI iv 1538/AG 39) So, is this world of genocide and natural disaster better than a world containing only one multifoliate rose? Yes, because the former is a world in which an infinity of minds perceive and reflect on the diversity of phenomena caused by a modest number of simple laws. To the more difficult question whether there is a better world with perhaps a little less genocide and natural disaster Leibniz can only respond that, if so, God would have brought it into actuality. And this, of course, is to say that there really is no better possible world.

 

 

Satire
from A Poet's Glossary
by Edward Hirsch

"Satire is essentially moral. Its fundamental mode is earnest joking, kidding on the square, improving society by attacking villains and fools. The editor of The Oxford Book of Satirical Verse (1980) notes, 'One can say gravely that satire postulates an ideal condition of man or decency, and then despairs of it; and enjoys the despair, masochistically. But the joke must not be lost—the joke of statement, of sound, of rhythm, form, vocabulary, rhyme, and surprise. Without the joke everything goes; and we may be left only with complaint, invective, or denunciation; all of which may be poetry, but of another kind.'"

 

 

From The Philosophical Dictionary
Virtue

"What is virtue? Beneficence towards the fellow-creature. Can I call virtue things other than those which do me good? I am needy, you are generous. I am in danger, you help me. I am deceived, you tell me the truth. I am neglected, you console me. I am ignorant, you teach me. Without difficulty I shall call you virtuous. But what will become of the cardinal and divine virtues? Some of them will remain in the schools.
     "What does it matter to me that you are temperate? you observe a precept of health; you will have better health, and I am happy to hear it. You have faith and hope, and I am happy still; they will procure you eternal life. Your divine virtues are celestial gifts; your cardinal virtues are excellent qualities which serve to guide you : but they are not virtues as regards your fellow-creature. The prudent man does good to himself, the virtuous man does good to mankind. St. Paul was right to tell you that charity prevails over faith and hope.
     "But shall only those that are useful to one's fellow-creature be admitted as virtues? How can I admit any others? We live in society; really, therefore, the only things that are good for us are those that are good for society. A recluse will be sober, pious; he will be clad in hair-cloth; he will be a saint: but I shall not call him virtuous until he has done some act of virtue by which other men have profited. So long as he is alone, he is doing neither good nor evil; for us he is nothing. If St. Bruno brought peace to families, if he succoured want, he was virtuous; if he fasted, prayed in solitude, he was a saint. Virtue among men is an interchange of kindness; he who has no part in this interchange should not be counted. If this saint were in the world, he would doubtless do good; but so long as he is not in the world, the world will be right in refusing him the title of virtuous; he will be good for himself and not for us.
     "But, you say to me, if a recluse is a glutton, a drunkard, given to secret debauches with himself, he is vicious; he is virtuous, therefore, if he has the Opposite qualities. That is what I cannot agree : he is a very disagreeable fellow if he has the faults you mention; but he is not vicious, wicked, punishable as regards society to whom these infamies do no harm. It is to be presumed that were he to return to society he would do harm there, that he would be very vicious; and it is even more probable that he would be a wicked man, than it is sure that the other temperate and chaste recluse would be a virtuous man, for in society faults increase, and good qualities diminish.
     "A much stronger objection is made; Nero, Pope Alexander VI., and other monsters of this species, have bestowed kindnesses; I answer hardily that on that day they were virtuous.
     "A few theologians say that the divine emperor Antonine was not virtuous; that he was a stubborn Stoic who, not content with commanding men, wished further to be esteemed by them; that he attributed to himself the good he did to the human race; that all his life he was just, laborious, beneficent through vanity, and that lie only deceived men through his virtues. " My God ! " I exclaim. " Give us often rogues like him !"

Assignments due
read them in full

stephenkingworking8


Wednesday, November 15. Vocabulary Quiz, Candide 7-18. Bonus question will give you a quote and ask you to write a blended analytical sentence.

Tuesday, November 28. Satire essay. Here are the details. If ever an essay is to be enjoyed, if ever an essay hit you where you live, then this is that essay! Here's your chance to rail against what irks you. Grind your teeth. A full essay grade. Read the entire assignment. Know the assignment's directions and expectations.

Monday, December 4. The deadline for Crime and Punishment essay rewrites for grade replacement. See Policy page for details and requirements. Use this template exactly and this guide to writing an essay. Your essay must be at least four ¶s.
 

 

Candide reading journal
what your journal should look like

   While we read Candide, you will keep a reading journal, a formal record of your responses to the novel. Use a notebook/notebook section dedicated to this journal. Your journal must be handwritten.
     For each day's reading, you will make a simple list of what the reading satirizes (human foibles, social, political, or religious practices, etc.); respond to at least two questions from the Study questions from Auburn U link posted under Candide reading links in the right column; identify at least two examples of the techniques of satire, with examples; and write at least one question of your own. You might also include short summaries of the reading; key plot points; examples of the novel using the elements of fiction; key quotations; and personal insights/reflections. The journal should prove valuable as you read and when you come to write about the novel.
     Your journal will have two columns, the left one for the questions, the right one for your responses to those questions. Your responses are to be evidence based—that is they must include quotations from the novel and your insights about them, including at least one B3-blended sentence. Think of these responses as practice in WFE.
     I expect responses that approximate TH/TS quality thinking. I will be checking your journal regularly for a quiz grade.
     Some big questions to focus on:
1. What are the sources/causes of evil/suffering?
2. What are the best/right responses to that evil/suffering? What is to be done about evil/suffering?.
3. What is Candide's attitude and understanding of the world and how/why does it change? How closely does he follow Pangloss's "philosophy"?
4. What changes Candide's attitude and understanding?
5. How does the novel use symmetry and parallelism as structuring and thematic devices?
6. Who are Candide's teachers and what are their teachings? What does the novel think about them and which if any of them is "correct"?

 

 

Candide vocabulary lists

Candide chapters 1-6
Candide chapters 7-18
Candide chapters 19-30
zipgrade ids

 

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
LBH sentences crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good quesstions
MLA style center

 

 

Candide
from In Our Time

 

 

From The Philosophical Dictionary
ways of having a false mind

1. By not examining if the principle is true, even when one deduces accurate consequences therefrom; and this way is common.

2. By drawing false consequences from a principle recognized as true. For example, a servant is asked if his master is in his room, by persons he suspects of wanting his life: if he were foolish enough to tell them the truth on the pretext that one must not lie, it is clear he would be drawing an absurd consequence from a very true principle.

A judge who would condemn a man who has killed his assassin, because homicide is forbidden, would be as iniquitous as he was poor reasoner.

Similar cases are subdivided in a thousand different gradations. The good mind, the just mind, is that which distinguishes them; whence comes that one has seen so many iniquitous judgments, not because the judges' hearts were bad, but because they were not sufficiently enlightened.

 

 

From Charles Simic

simic

"What [poet Czeslaw Milosz] and his family were to experience in their lifetimes under the pressure of historical events was the fate of many other people, and it included the most important lesson—that good and evil are not some debatable religious or philosophical concepts, but things one learns to recognize daily like hunger and the taste of bread."

Might the same be said about Candide and company?

November 6-10

Monday

tolstoy10 

 

 


 

Today. Crime and Punishment essay due. Paper copy in class, upload to Crime and Punishment essay FINAL at both Peergrade and turnitin by 15:30.

Introduction to The Age of Englightenment, Theodicy, Candide. Candide reading journal.

Introduction to satire. Class exercise, satire: Which one is not like the other?

Tonight. Read Candide chapter 1. See reading journal assignment below and in middle column. Watch Voltaire, an Introduction video in right column. You will have a quiz tomorrow. Know facts about Voltaire.
     While we read Candide, you will keep a reading journal, a formal record of your responses to the novel. Use a notebook/notebook section dedicated to this journal. Your journal must be handwritten. See details in middle column beneath heading Candide reading journal.

Ongoing. Sunday, November 12. Peergrade, Crime and Punishment essay by 22:00. A participation grade for feedback and responses to feedback.

 

 

Tuesday

chekov11 

 

 


 

Today. Quiz, Voltaire, an Introduction video. Discuss Candide chapter 1, including an introduction to satire and satirical techniques.

Tonight. Study for Vocab. Quiz, Candide 1-6. Bonus question from Edward Hirsch's definitions of parody and satire. Find the doc beneath Candide reading links in right column.

Ongoing. Sunday, November 12. Peergrade, Crime and Punishment essay by 22:00. A participation grade for feedback and responses to feedback.

 

 

Wednesday

chinuaachebecolor8 

 

 

 

 

Today. Vocab. Quiz, Candide 1-6.

Tonight. Read Candide chapters 2 & 3. Continue keeping your reading journal. See details beneath Candide reading journal heading in middle column. Two extra questions to consider, if you choose: 1) Evaluate Candide's claim on pages 8 & 9 that all is for the best.... Can he be right in this? Why does Candide hold to Pangloss's teaching? Does that make sense to you? 2) Evaluate the way Candide thinks about his experience in the world and about the world. Does he indeed make sound judgments as Chapter 1 tells us? Why do you suppose Voltaire has Candide think the way he does?

Ongoing. Sunday, November 12. Peergrade, Crime and Punishment essay by 22:00. A participation grade for feedback and responses to feedback.

 

 

Thursday

neruda11 

 

 

 

 

Today. Discuss Candide chapters 2 & 3.

Tonight. Take a night off.

Ongoing. Sunday, November 12. Peergrade, Crime and Punishment essay by 22:00. A participation grade for feedback and responses to feedback.

 

 

Friday

wislawasymborska8 

 

 

 

 

Today. Discuss Candide chapters 2 & 3. What your journal should look like.

Tonight. Read Candide chapters 4 & 5. Continue keeping your reading journal. See details beneath Candide reading journal heading in middle column.

Ongoing. Sunday, November 12. Peergrade, Crime and Punishment essay by 22:00. A participation grade for feedback and responses to feedback.

Candide
reading links

candide6

Satire by David Mikics
Satire, key intentions, techniques
Parody, Satire by Edward Hirsch
Changing nature of satire
Bildungsroman by David Mikics
Study questions from Auburn U
Alexander Pope's Essay on Man
Gustave Flaubert on Voltaire
Volaire from SEP
Toleration, Virtue by Voltaire

 

 

Voltaire, an Introduction


 

 

Leibniz on the Problem of Evil
from Stanford Encyclopedia
of Philosophy

7.2 Optimism
How can this world be the best of all possible worlds? After all, as Voltaire brought out so clearly in Candide, it certainly seems that this world, in which one finds no short supply of natural and moral horrors, is far from perfect—indeed, it seems pretty lousy. Certainly only a fool could believe that it is the best world possible. But, Leibniz speaks on behalf of the fool, with an argument that has essentially the following structure:
(1) God is omnipotent and omniscient and benevolent and the free creator of the world. (Definition)
(2) Things could have been otherwise—i.e., there are other possible worlds. (Premise)
(3) Suppose this world is not the best of all possible worlds. (I.e., The world could be better.)
(4) If this world is not the best of all possible worlds, then at least one of the following must be the case: God was not powerful enough to bring about a better world; or God did not know how this world would develop after his creation of it (i.e. God lacked foreknowledge); or God did not wish this world to be the best; or God did not create the world; or there were no other possible worlds from which God could choose.
(5) But, any one or more of the disjuncts of (4) contradicts (1) or (2).
(6) Therefore, this world is the best of all possible worlds.
     In other words, Leibniz seems to argue that, if one is to hold the traditional theistic conception of God and believe that one can meaningfully assert that the world could have been other than it is, then one must hold that this world is the best possible. Naturally, this argument is simply the Christian retort to the Epicurean argument against theism.
     But what are the criteria by which one can say that this world is the best? It should be clear that Leibniz nowhere says that this argument implies that everything has to be wonderful. Indeed, Leibniz is squarely in the tradition of all Christian apologists going back to Augustine, arguing that we cannot have knowledge of the whole of the world and that even if a piece of the mosaic that is discoverable to us is ugly the whole may indeed have great beauty. Still, Leibniz does offer at least two considerations relevant to the determination of the happiness and perfection of the world. He tells us in the Discourse on Metaphysics, first, that the happiness of minds is the principal aim of God (A VI iv 1537/AG 38) and, second, that God has chosen the most perfect world, that is, the one which is at the same time the simplest in hypotheses and the richest in phenomena. (A VI iv 1538/AG 39) So, is this world of genocide and natural disaster better than a world containing only one multifoliate rose? Yes, because the former is a world in which an infinity of minds perceive and reflect on the diversity of phenomena caused by a modest number of simple laws. To the more difficult question whether there is a better world with perhaps a little less genocide and natural disaster Leibniz can only respond that, if so, God would have brought it into actuality. And this, of course, is to say that there really is no better possible world.

 

 

Satire
from A Poet's Glossary
by Edward Hirsch

"Satire is essentially moral. Its fundamental mode is earnest joking, kidding on the square, improving society by attacking villains and fools. The editor of The Oxford Book of Satirical Verse (1980) notes, 'One can say gravely that satire postulates an ideal condition of man or decency, and then despairs of it; and enjoys the despair, masochistically. But the joke must not be lost—the joke of statement, of sound, of rhythm, form, vocabulary, rhyme, and surprise. Without the joke everything goes; and we may be left only with complaint, invective, or denunciation; all of which may be poetry, but of another kind.'"

Assignments due
read them in full

stephenkingworking7


Monday, November 6 (Wednesday, November 8 for Kairogians). Crime and Punishment essay. Include the information and follow the directions of this template or lose five points. Here's a helpful guide to writing an essay. Paper copy in class. Upload to Crime and Punishment essay FINAL at both peergrade and turnitin by 15:30.

Tuesday, November 7. Quiz, Voltaire, an Introduction video.

Wednesday, November 8. Vocabulary Quiz, Candide 1-6.

Sunday, November 12. Peergrade, Crime and Punishment essay by 22:00. A participation grade for feedback and responses to feedback.

 

 

Candide reading journal
what your journal should look like

   While we read Candide, you will keep a reading journal, a formal record of your responses to the novel. Use a notebook/notebook section dedicated to this journal. Your journal must be handwritten.
     For each day's reading, you will make a simple list of what the reading satirizes (human foibles, social, political, or religious practices, etc.); respond to at least two questions from the Study questions from Auburn U link posted under Candide reading links in the right column; identify at least two examples of the techniques of satire, with examples; and write at least one question of your own. You might also include short summaries of the reading; key plot points; examples of the novel using the elements of fiction; key quotations; and personal insights/reflections. The journal should prove valuable as you read and when you come to write about the novel.
     Your journal will have two columns, the left one for the questions, the right one for your responses to those questions. Your responses are to be evidence based—that is they must include quotations from the novel and your insights about them, including at least one B3-blended sentence. Think of these responses as practice in WFE.
     I expect responses that approximate TH/TS quality thinking. I will be checking your journal regularly for a quiz grade.
     Some big questions to focus on:
1. What are the sources/causes of evil/suffering?
2. What are the best/right responses to that evil/suffering? What is to be done about evil/suffering?.
3. What is Candide's attitude and understanding of the world and how/why does it change? How closely does he follow Pangloss's "philosophy"?
4. What changes Candide's attitude and understanding?
5. How does the novel use symmetry and parallelism as structuring and thematic devices?
6. Who are Candide's teachers and what are their teachings? What does the novel think about them and which if any of them is "correct"?

 

 

Candide vocabulary lists

Candide chapters 1-6
Candide chapters 7-18
Candide chapters 19-30
zipgrade ids

 

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
LBH sentences crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good quesstions
MLA style center

 

 

Candide
from In Our Time

 

 

From The Philosophical Dictionary
ways of having a false mind

1. By not examining if the principle is true, even when one deduces accurate consequences therefrom; and this way is common.

2. By drawing false consequences from a principle recognized as true. For example, a servant is asked if his master is in his room, by persons he suspects of wanting his life: if he were foolish enough to tell them the truth on the pretext that one must not lie, it is clear he would be drawing an absurd consequence from a very true principle.

A judge who would condemn a man who has killed his assassin, because homicide is forbidden, would be as iniquitous as he was poor reasoner.

Similar cases are subdivided in a thousand different gradations. The good mind, the just mind, is that which distinguishes them; whence comes that one has seen so many iniquitous judgments, not because the judges' hearts were bad, but because they were not sufficiently enlightened.

October 30-November 3

Monday

tolstoy9 

 

 


 

Today. Work Crime and Punishment ¶ revision.

Have the exact copy of Candide ready to go after Crime and Punishment. See details in right column. You will need the book next week.

Tonight. Complete your Crime and Punishment ¶ revision. Have it ready to upload to Peergrade Tuesday in class. Assignment to count two quiz grades.

Ongoing. Be working on your Crime and Punishment essay, due Monday, November 6. Use this template and follow its directions or lose five points.

Draft, Crime and Punishment essay due in class on Friday. Possible 5-point bonus on the essay for solid, complete draft and peergrading. Use the essay template.

 

 

Tuesday

chekov10 

 

 


 

Today. Final work on Crime and Punishment ¶ revisions. Be ready to upload yours Thursday in class.

Tonight. Study for Vocab. Quiz, Candide 1-6.

Ongoing. Be working on your Crime and Punishment essay, due Monday, November 6. Use this template and follow its directions or lose five points.

Draft, Crime and Punishment essay due in class on Friday. Possible 5-point bonus on the essay for solid, complete draft and peergrading. Use the essay template.

 

 

Wednesday

chinuaachebecolor7 

 

 

 

 

Today. Vocab. Quiz, Candide 1-6. If time remains, examine TH and TS in class. Have access to yours.

Tonight.

Ongoing. Be working on your Crime and Punishment essay, due Monday, November 6. Use this template and follow its directions or lose five points.

Draft, Crime and Punishment essay due in class on Friday. Possible 5-point bonus on the essay for solid, complete draft and peergrading. Use the essay template.

 

 

Thursday

neruda10 

 

 

 

 

Today. Examine Crime and Punishment ¶ revisions. Be ready to upload yours to Peergrade.

Tonight.

Ongoing. Be working on your Crime and Punishment essay, due Monday, November 6. Use this template and follow its directions or lose five points.

Draft, Crime and Punishment essay due in class on Friday. Possible 5-point bonus on the essay for solid, complete draft and peergrading. Use the essay template.

 

 

Friday

wislawasymborska7 

 

 

 

 

Today. Peergrade, Crime and Punishment essay drafts today.

Peergrade, Crime and Punishment essay draft due Saturday by 22:00. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Tonight.

Ongoing. Be working on your Crime and Punishment essay, due Monday, November 6. Use this template and follow its directions or lose five points.

Crime and Punishment essay due Monday. See details under Assignments due in middle column. Here's a helpful guide to writing an essay.

Have Candide ready to go next week.

Candide
reading links

candide4

Satire by David Mikics
Study questions from Auburn U
Alexander Pope's Essay on Man
Volaire from SEP

 

Buy this exact book
click cover for details

candide5

 

 

Voltaire, an Introduction


 

 

Leibniz on the Problem of Evil
from Stanford Encyclopedia
of Philosophy

7.2 Optimism
How can this world be the best of all possible worlds? After all, as Voltaire brought out so clearly in Candide, it certainly seems that this world, in which one finds no short supply of natural and moral horrors, is far from perfect—indeed, it seems pretty lousy. Certainly only a fool could believe that it is the best world possible. But, Leibniz speaks on behalf of the fool, with an argument that has essentially the following structure:
(1) God is omnipotent and omniscient and benevolent and the free creator of the world. (Definition)
(2) Things could have been otherwise—i.e., there are other possible worlds. (Premise)
(3) Suppose this world is not the best of all possible worlds. (I.e., The world could be better.)
(4) If this world is not the best of all possible worlds, then at least one of the following must be the case: God was not powerful enough to bring about a better world; or God did not know how this world would develop after his creation of it (i.e. God lacked foreknowledge); or God did not wish this world to be the best; or God did not create the world; or there were no other possible worlds from which God could choose.
(5) But, any one or more of the disjuncts of (4) contradicts (1) or (2).
(6) Therefore, this world is the best of all possible worlds.
     In other words, Leibniz seems to argue that, if one is to hold the traditional theistic conception of God and believe that one can meaningfully assert that the world could have been other than it is, then one must hold that this world is the best possible. Naturally, this argument is simply the Christian retort to the Epicurean argument against theism.
     But what are the criteria by which one can say that this world is the best? It should be clear that Leibniz nowhere says that this argument implies that everything has to be wonderful. Indeed, Leibniz is squarely in the tradition of all Christian apologists going back to Augustine, arguing that we cannot have knowledge of the whole of the world and that even if a piece of the mosaic that is discoverable to us is ugly the whole may indeed have great beauty. Still, Leibniz does offer at least two considerations relevant to the determination of the happiness and perfection of the world. He tells us in the Discourse on Metaphysics, first, that the happiness of minds is the principal aim of God (A VI iv 1537/AG 38) and, second, that God has chosen the most perfect world, that is, the one which is at the same time the simplest in hypotheses and the richest in phenomena. (A VI iv 1538/AG 39) So, is this world of genocide and natural disaster better than a world containing only one multifoliate rose? Yes, because the former is a world in which an infinity of minds perceive and reflect on the diversity of phenomena caused by a modest number of simple laws. To the more difficult question whether there is a better world with perhaps a little less genocide and natural disaster Leibniz can only respond that, if so, God would have brought it into actuality. And this, of course, is to say that there really is no better possible world.

Assignments due
read them in full

stephenkingworking6


Monday, October 30. A clear outline of the essay—TH and the list of TS, complete with ¶ hooks.

Wednesday, November 8. Vocab. Quiz, Candide 1-6.

Thursday, November 2. Crime and Punishment ¶ revision. Be ready to upload your revised ¶ to Peergrade in class. ¶ to count two quiz grades.

Friday, November 3. Full draft Crime and Punishment essay ready to upload to Peergrade in class. Possible 5-point bonus on the essay for solid, complete draft and peergrading. Use this essay template. To qualify for the bonus, the essay must be solid, complete, new or newly revised and follow the template.

Saturday, November 4 by 22:00. Peergrade, Crime and Punishment essay draft. A participation grade.

Monday, November 6 (Wednesday, November 8 for Kairogians). Crime and Punishment essay. Include the information and follow the directions of this template or lose five points. Here's a helpful guide to writing an essay.

 

 

Candide vocabulary lists

Candide chapters 1-6
Candide chapters 7-18
Candide chapters 19-30

 

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
LBH sentences crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good quesstions
MLA style center

 

 

Candide
from In Our Time

 

 

The Problem of Evil

October 23-27

Monday

tolstoy8 

 

 


 

Today. Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT REVISION due. Paper in class, upload to assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT REVISION at both peergrade and turnitin by 15:30. You will have time in class to upload your work.

We will discuss closing ¶s. Bring Degen and Trimble.

Have the exact copy of Candide ready to go after Crime and Punishment. See details in right column.

Tonight. Find at least one rich passage in Part 6 Chapters 1 & 2 about the theme of suffering I want to see that passage annotated in your book. Using that passage, practice your analytical voice by writing a sentence blending in B3 fashion quotations with your insight. I will collect this sentence for a quiz grade.

Ongoing. Peergrade, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT REVISION, due Friday, October 27 by 22:00. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Be working on your Crime and Punishment essay, due Monday, October 30.

 

 

Tuesday

chekov9 

 

 


 

Today. We will discuss Crime and Punishment Part 6 Chapters 1 & 2. Throughout this week, we will work on blending and elaborating quotations. Bring Crime and Punishment and Degen.

Tonight. Find at least one rich passage in Part 6 Chapters 3 & 4 about Svidrigailov. I want to see that passage annotated in your book. Using that passage, practice your analytical voice by writing a sentence blending in B3 fashion quotations with your insight. I will collect this sentence for a quiz grade.

Ongoing. Peergrade, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT REVISION, due Friday, October 27 by 22:00. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Be working on your Crime and Punishment essay, due Monday, October 30.

 

 

Wednesday

chinuaachebecolor6 

 

 

 

 

Today. Today we will discuss Crime and Punishment Part 6 Chapter 3 & 4.

Tonight. Find at least one rich passage in Part 6 Chapters 5 & 6 about your choice of topic. I want to see that passage annotated in your book. Using that passage, practice your analytical voice by writing a sentence blending in B3 fashion quotations with your insight. I will collect this sentence for a quiz grade.

Ongoing. Peergrade, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT REVISION, due Friday, October 27 by 22:00. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Be working on your Crime and Punishment essay, due Monday, October 30.

 

 

Thursday

neruda9 

 

 

 

 

Today. We will discuss Crime and Punishment Part 6 Chapter 5 & 6. Throughout this week, we will work on blending and elaborating quotations. Bring Crime and Punishment and Degen.

Tonight. Find at least one rich passage in Part 6 Chapters 7 & 8 and Epilogue about your choice of topic. I want to see that passage annotated in your book. Using that passage, practice your analytical voice by writing a sentence blending in B3 fashion quotations with your insight. I will collect this sentence for a quiz grade.

Ongoing. Peergrade, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT REVISION, due Friday, October 27 by 22:00. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Be working on your Crime and Punishment essay, due Monday, October 30.

 

 

Friday

wislawasymborska6 

 

 

 

 

Today. Today, you will work with a partner to revise this ¶. Copy/paste it into a new Google Doc.

Peergrade, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT REVISION due Saturday by 22:00. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Tonight.

POSTPONED. Crime and Punishment essay. Include the information and follow the directions of this template or lose five points.

Monday, October 30. A clear outline of the essay—TH and the list of TS, complete with ¶ hooks. .

Crime and Punishment
reading links

crimeandpunishmentcoverreadinglinks5

 

Character list
Chronology of Part 1 and map of Petersburg
Sample annotated opening pages
What C & P can teach you that the internet can't
Archbishop Rowan Williams on Dostoevsky

Raskolnikov's St. Petersburg, map of his travels

Articles on Crime and Punishment
Dostoevsky's empathy
Is reason always wrong? Kant's Categorical Imperative
Kant and Hume on morality
Reverence by Paul Woodruff
Paul Woodruff talks to Bill Moyers
A few words about plot by Justin Cronin
Crime and Punishment, a simple summary
List of passages about Raskolnikov

 

 

Buy this exact book
click cover for details

candide3

 

 

Dostoevsky's characterization
Vladimir Nabokov

AMAGNUMIG6“Dostoyevsky characterizes his people through situation, through ethical matters, their psychological reactions, their inside ripples. After describing the looks of a character, he uses the old-fashioned device of not referring to his specific physical appearance anymore in the scenes with him. This is not the way of an artist—say Tolstoy—who sees his character in his mind all the time and knows exactly the specific gesture he will employ at this or that moment. But there is something more striking still about Dostoyevsky.”

 

 

Empthy versus sympathy

repinbargehaulersonthevolga5

"In 1909, the psychologist Edward Titchener translated the German Einfhlung ('feeling into') into English as empathy. Empathy can be defined as a person's ability to recognize and share the emotions of another person, fictional character, or sentient being. It involves, first, seeing someone else's situation from his perspective, and, second, sharing his emotions, including, if any, his distress.
     "For me to share in someone else's perspective, I must do more than merely put myself into his position. Instead, I must imagine myself as him, and, more than that, imagine myself as him in the particular situation in which he finds himself. I cannot empathize with an abstract or detached feeling. To empathize with a particular person, I need to have at least some knowledge of who he is and what he is doing or trying to do. As John Steinbeck wrote, 'It means very little to know that a million Chinese are starving unless you know one Chinese who is starving.'
     "Empathy is often confused with pity, sympathy, and compassion, which are each reactions to the plight of others. Pity is a feeling of discomfort at the distress of one or more sentient beings, and often has paternalistic or condescending overtones. Implicit in the notion of pity is that its object does not deserve its plight, and, moreover, is unable to prevent, reverse, or overturn it. Pity is less engaged than empathy, sympathy, or compassion, amounting to little more than a conscious acknowledgement of the plight of its object."

 

 

Russian modernist film
Man with a movie camera
Dziga Vertov

 

 

Russian stop-motion animation
Hedgehog in the fog
Yuri Norstein

Assignments due
read them in full

stephenkingworking5


Monday, October 23. Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT REVISION. Paper copy in class, upload to assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT REVISION at both peergrade and turnitin by 15:30. You will have time in class to upload your work.

Saturday, October 27 by 22:00. Peergrade, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT REVISION. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Monday, October 30. A clear outline of the essay—TH and the list of TS, complete with ¶ hooks.

POSTPONED. Crime and Punishment essay. Include the information and follow the directions of this template or lose five points.

 

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
LBH sentences crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good quesstions
MLA style center

 

 

Crime and Punishment essay

dostoevskyforcpessay8One of the most frequent and telling patterns in literature is repetition. Repetition clues us into what the author wants us to notice, what he or she thinks matters. As you continue to read Crime and Punishment, note some repeated element. You might see a word (one associated with a character, say), an image, a character's repeated action or thought, a setting, an allusion, a theme. See the list on page 94 in Degen. But be creative here. You might, for instance, choose something off the beaten track, comparing how Dostoevsky describes his characters, for instance, or the hidden clues in clothing. Don't think you need to slavishly follow my suggestions or Degen's list. Be open to growth, my friends. His questions for each category, are fine, but don't be limited to them. He lists some questions for each category, but don't be limited to them. Follow your own thinking and interests. Let your interest drive your thinking and writing. Remember the questions I asked you to write last week? Read this about asking good questions. And remember that literature shows you human truth.

You will devise your own topic by choosing one repeated element you find interesting, and over time discovering an interesting and insightful way of thinking about the repeated element. You will then define a way of organizing the essay, perhaps from those found in option two on pages 95-103 in Degen.

As you read the novel, record telling evidence about your repeated element, and do so in some organized way—front/back of your book; on paper; a doc; or using post-it notes or colored tabs. Notice what the novel's showing you about your element, what questions it prompts you to ask, what answers it offers. On each note record the questions you ask or the relevance you see to your category and cross reference examples as you go. The more you read, the more you should begin to find interesting questions and to enrich and clarify your thinking.

Read and think thematically. Here's a good introduction to theme. You will eventually link your repeated element to theme.

The patterns you discover and the questions you ask will lead you to an interesting thesis.

We'll finalize your topic and thesis later, in conference.

For this and all writing assignments, do no Googling or other research. Reading other people's ideas gets in the way of your own and often sends them packing. Who knows what you would have thought? Develop your own thinking and writing, your own ability to create a point of view. That matters more than you know. Use nothing other than your book, your class notes, and your own mind.

October 16-20

Monday

tolstoy7 

 

 


 

Today. Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT due. Paper in class, upload to assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT at both peergrade and turnitin by 15:30.

We will discuss Crime and Punishment Part 4. Throughout this week, we will work on blending and elaborating quotations and practicing analytical voice. Bring Crime and Punishment and Degen.

Have the exact copy of Candide ready to go after Crime and Punishment. See details in right column.

Tonight. Find at least one rich passage satirizing progressivist thinking in Part 5 Chapters 1 & 2. Look at Lebezyatnikov's arguments and statements. I want to see that passage annotated in your book. Using that passage, practice your analytical voice by writing a sentence blending in B3 fashion quotations with your insight. I will collect this sentence for a quiz grade.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 6 & Epilogue. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT 2 due Monday, October 23. See assignment details under Assignment due in middle column.

Crime and Punishment essay due Monday, October 30.

 

 

Tuesday

chekov8 

 

 


 

Today. We will discuss Crime and Punishment Part 5 Chapters 1 & 2. Throughout this week, we will work on blending and elaborating quotations. Bring Crime and Punishment and Degen.

Tonight. Study for Vocab. Quiz, Crime and Punishment Part 4.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 6 & Epilogue. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT 2 due Monday, October 23 See assignment details under Assignment due in middle column.

Crime and Punishment essay due Monday, October 30.

 

 

Wednesday

chinuaachebecolor5 

 

 

 

 

Today. Vocab. Quiz, Crime and Punishment Part 4. Bring Crime and Punishment and Degen, too.

Tonight. Find at least one rich passages about Luzhin's crime in Part 5 Chapter 3. I want to see that passage annotated in your book. Using that passage, practice your analytical voice by writing a sentence blending in B3 fashion quotations with your insight. I will collect this sentence for a quiz grade.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 6 & Epilogue. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT 2 due Monday, October 23. See assignment details under Assignment due in middle column.

Crime and Punishment essay due Monday, October 30.

 

 

Thursday

neruda8 

 

 

 

 

Today. We will discuss Crime and Punishment Part 5 Chapter 3. Throughout this week, we will work on blending and elaborating quotations. Bring Crime and Punishment and Degen.

Tonight. Find at least one rich passage about Raskolnikov's struggle or growth in Part 5 Chapters 4 & 5. I want to see those passages annotated in your book. Using that passage, practice your analytical voice by writing a sentence blending in B3 fashion quotations with your insight. I will collect this sentence for a quiz grade.

Ongoing. Crime and Punishment Part 6 & Epilogue. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT 2 due Monday, October 23. See assignment details under Assignment due in middle column.

Crime and Punishment essay due Monday, October 30.

 

 

Friday

wislawasymborska5 

 

 

 

 

Today. We will discuss Crime and Punishment Part 5 Chapters 4 & 5. Throughout this week, we will work on blending and elaborating quotations. Bring Crime and Punishment and Degen.

Tonight. On Monday, bring Trimble, Writing with Style, Crime and Punishment, and Degen.

Saturday, October 21. Peergrade, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT by 15:30. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 6 & Epilogue, due Monday. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book. I'll be checking them for a quiz.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT REVISION due Monday, October 23. See assignment details under Assignments due in middle column—AND FOLLOW THEM. Your page will look like this. If your page doesn't look like the template, your ¶ will lose five points. You will turn in the original, marked version and the new revision.

Crime and Punishment essay due Monday, October 30.

Crime and Punishment
reading links

crimeandpunishmentcoverreadinglinks4

 

Character list
Chronology of Part 1 and map of Petersburg
Sample annotated opening pages
What C & P can teach you that the internet can't
Archbishop Rowan Williams on Dostoevsky

Raskolnikov's St. Petersburg, map of his travels

Articles on Crime and Punishment
Dostoevsky's empathy
Is reason always wrong? Kant's Categorical Imperative
Kant and Hume on morality
Reverence by Paul Woodruff
Paul Woodruff talks to Bill Moyers
A few words about plot by Justin Cronin
Crime and Punishment, a simple summary
List of passages about Raskolnikov

 

 

Buy this exact book
click cover for details

candide1

 

 

Dostoevsky's characterization
Vladimir Nabokov

AMAGNUMIG5“Dostoyevsky characterizes his people through situation, through ethical matters, their psychological reactions, their inside ripples. After describing the looks of a character, he uses the old-fashioned device of not referring to his specific physical appearance anymore in the scenes with him. This is not the way of an artist—say Tolstoy—who sees his character in his mind all the time and knows exactly the specific gesture he will employ at this or that moment. But there is something more striking still about Dostoyevsky.”

 

 

On Dostoevsky
Charles Block

byheartdostoevsky5"So 10th grade, Crime and Punishment. After school, I started reading along with the class for the first time.
     "It got even weirder, because the pawnbroker Raskolnikov murders is a gruff woman. She reminded me a little of my mother. I think of my mom as a very kind person, but she never wanted to be a pawnbroker. She used to say, Don't tell people what we do. She always said, Tell people your parents are in sales. She didn't want people to judge us, I guess. In any case, she wasn't really suited for it. She was a nervous person who could get upset easily, and she didn't enjoy being down there. She could really not be easy with the customers.
     "So as Dostoyevsky presented this woman, who acts gruffly towards Raskolnikov and treats him with suspicion, it was not too hard to see the parallels—and that made me feel kind of sick. It was so much like what I knew. And in that familiar setting, the worst nightmare takes place. The murder is so clearly and so cleanly described.
     Dostoyevsky is fairly bloodless about this. There's no melodrama—it's very plain description. One thing that was strange to me, back then, was that we actually care about Raskolnikov. We want him to get away with murder. I could tell, even then, that the whole point of the book is that you want him to get away this, that you're rooting for him.
     "But how was I supposed to do that?
     "Other sections of the book also got to me—especially the fact that, after killing and robbing the woman, Raskolnikov returns home and goes to sleep. That, I understood: It's what I do all the time. When I was fifteen and had my learner's permit, I drove my dad's car into a wall. Afterwards, I went home and got in bed and tried to hide. It's what I still do, even now, after any failure or bad thing—when my teeth hurt, or I'm trying to figure something out, or I'm at an impasse in my work, one of the things I do is take a nap. I consider myself one of the world's great nappers. I'll set my alarm for ten minutes, and I'm not sure if I fall asleep or not, but I sit there thinking and relax.
     "To see that someone knew the human condition this deeply. I remember thinking, how does Dostoyevsky know I do this? It had a profound effect on me. The writer of this book had somehow created intimate connections between my life in Las Vegas and 19th-century Russia. I understood, for the first time, that there is a deeper truth going on in fiction. I don't think it changed my everyday malaise, or my lostness. That wasn't going to change for a long time. But, I do think some larger doors started to open—in my understanding of what people can know, of what literature might be."

 

 

Empthy versus sympathy

repinbargehaulersonthevolga4

"In 1909, the psychologist Edward Titchener translated the German Einfhlung ('feeling into') into English as empathy. Empathy can be defined as a person's ability to recognize and share the emotions of another person, fictional character, or sentient being. It involves, first, seeing someone else's situation from his perspective, and, second, sharing his emotions, including, if any, his distress.
     "For me to share in someone else's perspective, I must do more than merely put myself into his position. Instead, I must imagine myself as him, and, more than that, imagine myself as him in the particular situation in which he finds himself. I cannot empathize with an abstract or detached feeling. To empathize with a particular person, I need to have at least some knowledge of who he is and what he is doing or trying to do. As John Steinbeck wrote, 'It means very little to know that a million Chinese are starving unless you know one Chinese who is starving.'
     "Empathy is often confused with pity, sympathy, and compassion, which are each reactions to the plight of others. Pity is a feeling of discomfort at the distress of one or more sentient beings, and often has paternalistic or condescending overtones. Implicit in the notion of pity is that its object does not deserve its plight, and, moreover, is unable to prevent, reverse, or overturn it. Pity is less engaged than empathy, sympathy, or compassion, amounting to little more than a conscious acknowledgement of the plight of its object."

 

 

Russian modernist film
Man with a movie camera
Dziga Vertov

 

 

Russian stop-motion animation
Hedgehog in the fog
Yuri Norstein

Assignments due
read them in full

stephenkingworking4


Monday, October 16. Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT. Paper copy in class, upload to assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT at both peergrade and turnitin by 15:30.

Wednesday, October 18. Vocab. Quiz, Crime and Punishment Part 4. Shortened version with fewer sentences.

Saturday, October 21. Peergrade, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT by 15:30. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Monday, October 23. Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT REVISION.     
     Your task for Monday is to write a revision of your Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT.
     Work to improve your TH and TS by clarifying your subject, how you think about that subject from the novel and what the novel teaches you about that subject. Those are the three parts of TH and TS.
     Continue using the ¶ on Degen page 54 and this one about Razumikhin as models.
     Think and write in your natural voice.
     Here's what your page should look like. If yours doesn't, your ¶ will lose five points.
     Focus on editing marks TH (pages 224-25); TS (pages 220-23); P (pages 210-14); T (217-20); B (pages 192-96); and E (pages 198-202). Use Degen's concrete methods to improve your writing and thinking.
     Paper copy of old, marked version and the newly revised one due in class. You will turn in the original, marked version and the new revision. Follow MLA format for heading, citations, and works cited page; and use only Times New Roman font size 12. Fail to follow directions and lose five points. An essay grade. Have access to the digital version. You will upload to peergrade and to turnitin at the beginning of class. Use Google Docs for your writing or transfer your work to a Google Doc before you arrive to class Monday. You will upload that Google Doc via a shared link to peergrade.
     See Essay submission on the policy page for details. An essay grade.

Monday, October 23. Crime and Punishment Part 6 & Epilogue. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Monday, October 30. Crime and Punishment essay.

 

 

Crime and Punishment
reading schedule

Review the vocabulary list before reading.

Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development and on the novel's moral themes. They will be our focus.

When you read, note key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Due September 25: Parts 2 & 3, pages 89-278.
Due October 9: Part 4, pages 281-358.
Due October 16: Part 5, pages 361-436.
Due October 23: Part 6 & Epilogue, pages 439-551.

 

 

Crime and Punishment vocab lists

Crime and Punishment Part 1 list
Crime and Punishment Part 2 list
Crime and Punishment Part 3 list
Crime and Punishment Part 4 list
Crime and Punishment Part 5 list
Crime and Punishment Part 6, Epilogue list
zipgrade student ids

 

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
LBH sentences crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good quesstions
MLA style center

 

 

Crime and Punishment essay

dostoevskyforcpessay7One of the most frequent and telling patterns in literature is repetition. Repetition clues us into what the author wants us to notice, what he or she thinks matters. As you continue to read Crime and Punishment, note some repeated element. You might see a word (one associated with a character, say), an image, a character's repeated action or thought, a setting, an allusion, a theme. See the list on page 94 in Degen. But be creative here. You might, for instance, choose something off the beaten track, comparing how Dostoevsky describes his characters, for instance, or the hidden clues in clothing. Don't think you need to slavishly follow my suggestions or Degen's list. Be open to growth, my friends. His questions for each category, are fine, but don't be limited to them. He lists some questions for each category, but don't be limited to them. Follow your own thinking and interests. Let your interest drive your thinking and writing. Remember the questions I asked you to write last week? Read this about asking good questions. And remember that literature shows you human truth.

You will devise your own topic by choosing one repeated element you find interesting, and over time discovering an interesting and insightful way of thinking about the repeated element. You will then define a way of organizing the essay, perhaps from those found in option two on pages 95-103 in Degen.

As you read the novel, record telling evidence about your repeated element, and do so in some organized way—front/back of your book; on paper; a doc; or using post-it notes or colored tabs. Notice what the novel's showing you about your element, what questions it prompts you to ask, what answers it offers. On each note record the questions you ask or the relevance you see to your category and cross reference examples as you go. The more you read, the more you should begin to find interesting questions and to enrich and clarify your thinking.

Read and think thematically. Here's a good introduction to theme. You will eventually link your repeated element to theme.

The patterns you discover and the questions you ask will lead you to an interesting thesis.

We'll finalize your topic and thesis later, in conference.

For this and all writing assignments, do no Googling or other research. Reading other people's ideas gets in the way of your own and often sends them packing. Who knows what you would have thought? Develop your own thinking and writing, your own ability to create a point of view. That matters more than you know. Use nothing other than your book, your class notes, and your own mind.

October 9-13

Monday

 

 

 


 

Today. Bring Crime and Punishment and Degen. Our continued discussion of Crime and Punishment Parts 2, 3 & 4. We'll continue following the moments of Raskolnikov's confrontation with himself and his ideas to understand his moral transformation. Have your list of annotated passaged ready.

See list of passages to do with Raskolnikov's progress under Crime and Punishment reading links.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION due. Paper in class, upload to assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION at both turnitin and peergrade by 15:30. Remove your name from peergrade copy if you like. See Essay submission on the policy page for details.

Have the exact copy of Candide ready to go after Crime and Punishment. See details in right column.

Tonight. Look through Part 3. Follow Raskolnikov's plot journey. Find at least two good examples of Raskolnikov facing his demons. What do they show you about Raskolnikov? Which of the novel's themes are they related to? What do those passaged show you about those themes?

Begin working on Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT DRAFT, to be peergraded Friday during class.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 4. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT due Monday, October 16. See assignment details under Assignment due in middle column.

Crime and Punishment essay due Monday, October 30.

 

 

Tuesday

 

 

 


 

Today. Bring Crime and Punishment and Degen. Our continued discussion of Crime and Punishment Parts 2, 3 & 4. We'll continue following the moments of Raskolnikov's confrontation with himself and his ideas to understand his moral transformation. Have your list of annotated passaged ready.

Tonight. Look through Part 4. Follow Raskolnikov's plot journey. Find at least two good examples of Raskolnikov facing his demons. What do they show you about Raskolnikov? Which of the novel's themes are they related to? What do those passaged show you about those themes? I'll ask to see your list annotated, either in your notebook or in your book.

Continue working on Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT DRAFT, to be peergraded Friday during class.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 5. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT due Monday, October 16. See assignment details under Assignment due in middle column.

Crime and Punishment essay due Monday, October 30.

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. No classes. Testing and Career Day.

Tonight. Look through Part 4 chapters 4-6. Follow Raskolnikov's plot journey. Find at least two good examples of Raskolnikov facing his demons. What do they show you about Raskolnikov? Which of the novel's themes are they related to? What do those passaged show you about those themes? I'll ask to see your list annotated, either in your notebook or in your book.

Continue working on Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT DRAFT, to be peergraded Friday during class.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 5. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT due Monday, October 16. See assignment details under Assignment due in middle column.

Crime and Punishment essay due Monday, October 30.

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Bring Crime and Punishment and Degen. Our continued discussion of Crime and Punishment Parts 2, 3 & 4. We'll continue following the moments of Raskolnikov's confrontation with himself and his ideas to understand his moral transformation. Have your list of annotated passaged ready.

Tonight. Continue working on Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT DRAFT, to be peergraded Friday during class.

Ongoing. Crime and Punishment Part 5. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT due Monday, October 16. See assignment details under Assignment due in middle column.

Crime and Punishment essay due Monday, October 30.

 

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Peergrade Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT DRAFT tody in class.

Tonight. Enjoy doing something other than academics.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 5, due Monday. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book. I'll be checking them for a quiz.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT due Monday, October 16. See assignment details under Assignment due in middle column. Use Google Docs to write or transfer your work to a Google Doc for Monday. Have access to that doc in class on Monday. Read the assignment, in full.

Crime and Punishment essay due Monday, October 30.

Assignments due
read them in full


Monday, October 9. Take your Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION and pay attention to the blending of your quotations and your topic string. Review the principles for blending quotations, found on Degen pages 192-96 and those about topic string in pages 217-20. Then improve the blending of your quotations and clarify your topic string. The main weakness I see in quote blending is B4, and I'm not seeing the concrete repetition of your topic string. Highlight the topic string throughout your ¶. Two quiz grades. Bring a paper copy to class.

Friday, October 13. Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT DRAFT. Have a Google Doc of this by class on Friday, ready to be peergraded.

Monday, October 16. Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT.
     Now that you've learned a bit more about writing body ¶s and written two, turn your practice to your repeated element and the upcoming essay on Crime and Punishment.
     Write the best, clearest, most interesting TH you can about how you're currently thinking about your repeataed element (RE). Look at several instances of your RE. Work from the page, noticing the clues Dostoevsky places there. What do you notice? What associations do you make, what thematic idea bubbles through them? What does RE tell you about that theme? Is your RE about love, about the power of noble feelings, about restoring the human community, about the dangers of intellect, the good of emotion? Find the theme and define what RE tells you about that theme. Knowing what RE says about theme will point you to a good TH, and a good TH is a lot. You shouldn't move forward until you're satisfied with your TH. That's step one.
     Step two is to define the topics your TH needs to cover. Ask yourself if developing a few instances of RE will be interesting and compelling. If so, define what each instance shows you about TH. Doing that points you to a series of TS. Be wise when choosing instances to discuss. You want them to reveal aspects of TH or to open up deeper stuff about TH. Once you've done this you have a conceptual outline of the essay.
     Your thinking will change as you continue to read, that's fine. Work with what you think now. Imagine an essay developing your TH and write at least three TS, the best you can now. Make those TS follow a clear focus reflecting how you're thinking about your TH from the novel. Are you looking at Raskolnikov's moments of rationalizing his justification for the murder? At Luzhin's utilitarian thinking? Whatever you're doing, your RE must be fairly concrete in the novel and your essay must develop TH/TS in a consistent way.
     Your task for Monday is to write one of the body ¶s of that essay. (You might use the ¶ in the final essay if it fits, but don't worry about that now. Focus on improving your body ¶ writing skills.) I want to see ever stronger TH and TS, a clearer topic string, better transitions and more elaboration of quotations, in phrases following the quotations—more LTR, in other words. Look specifically at something in the quotation, just as we've been doing in class.
     Continue using the ¶ on Degen page 54 and this one about Razumikhin as models.
     Think and write in your natural voice.
     Before your TH, define your RE; specifically indicate the ¶'s organization method and explain why/how the choice complements your TH/TS; then specifically highlight each instance of the the word that defines ¶'s topic string. Include your TH and the other TS you wrote and indicate where in the essay your developing ¶ belongs.
     Focus on editing marks TH (pages 224-25); TS (pages 220-23); P (pages 210-14); T (217-20); B (pages 192-96); and E (pages 198-202). Use Degen's concrete methods to improve your writing and thinking.
     Paper copy due in class. Follow MLA format for heading, citations, and works cited page; and use only Times New Roman font size 12. An essay grade. In addition to a paper copy—which you will give to me—also have access to the digital version. You will upload to peergrade and to turnitin at the beginning of class. Use Google Docs for your writing or transfer your work to a Google Doc before you arrive to class Monday. You will upload that Google Doc via a shared link to peergrade.
     See Essay submission on the policy page for details. An essay grade.

Monday, October 16. Crime and Punishment Part 5. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Monday, October 30. Crime and Punishment essay.

 

 

Crime and Punishment
reading schedule

Review the vocabulary list before reading.

Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development and on the novel's moral themes. They will be our focus.

When you read, note key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Due September 25: Parts 2 & 3, pages 89-278.
Due October 9: Part 4, pages 281-358.
Due October 16: Part 5, pages 361-436.
Due October 23: Part 6 & Epilogue, pages 439-551.

 

 

Crime and Punishment vocab lists

Crime and Punishment Part 1 list
Crime and Punishment Part 2 list
Crime and Punishment Part 3 list
Crime and Punishment Part 4 list
Crime and Punishment Part 5 list
Crime and Punishment Part 6, Epilogue list
zipgrade student ids

 

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
LBH sentences crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good quesstions
MLA style center

 

 

Crime and Punishment essay

One of the most frequent and telling patterns in literature is repetition. Repetition clues us into what the author wants us to notice, what he or she thinks matters. As you continue to read Crime and Punishment, note some repeated element. You might see a word (one associated with a character, say), an image, a character's repeated action or thought, a setting, an allusion, a theme. See the list on page 94 in Degen. But be creative here. You might, for instance, choose something off the beaten track, comparing how Dostoevsky describes his characters, for instance, or the hidden clues in clothing. Don't think you need to slavishly follow my suggestions or Degen's list. Be open to growth, my friends. His questions for each category, are fine, but don't be limited to them. He lists some questions for each category, but don't be limited to them. Follow your own thinking and interests. Let your interest drive your thinking and writing. Remember the questions I asked you to write last week? Read this about asking good questions. And remember that literature shows you human truth.

You will devise your own topic by choosing one repeated element you find interesting, and over time discovering an interesting and insightful way of thinking about the repeated element. You will then define a way of organizing the essay, perhaps from those found in option two on pages 95-103 in Degen.

As you read the novel, record telling evidence about your repeated element, and do so in some organized way—front/back of your book; on paper; a doc; or using post-it notes or colored tabs. Notice what the novel's showing you about your element, what questions it prompts you to ask, what answers it offers. On each note record the questions you ask or the relevance you see to your category and cross reference examples as you go. The more you read, the more you should begin to find interesting questions and to enrich and clarify your thinking.

Read and think thematically. Here's a good introduction to theme. You will eventually link your repeated element to theme.

The patterns you discover and the questions you ask will lead you to an interesting thesis.

We'll finalize your topic and thesis later, in conference.

For this and all writing assignments, do no Googling or other research. Reading other people's ideas gets in the way of your own and often sends them packing. Who knows what you would have thought? Develop your own thinking and writing, your own ability to create a point of view. That matters more than you know. Use nothing other than your book, your class notes, and your own mind.

Crime and Punishment
reading links

 

Character list
Chronology of Part 1 and map of Petersburg
Sample annotated opening pages
What C & P can teach you that the internet can't
Archbishop Rowan Williams on Dostoevsky

Raskolnikov's St. Petersburg, map of his travels

Articles on Crime and Punishment
Dostoevsky's empathy
Is reason always wrong? Kant's Categorical Imperative
Kant and Hume on morality
Reverence by Paul Woodruff
Paul Woodruff talks to Bill Moyers
A few words about plot by Justin Cronin
Crime and Punishment, a simple summary
List of passages about Raskolnikov

 

 

Buy this exact book
click cover for details

 

 

Dostoevsky's characterization
Vladimir Nabokov

“Dostoyevsky characterizes his people through situation, through ethical matters, their psychological reactions, their inside ripples. After describing the looks of a character, he uses the old-fashioned device of not referring to his specific physical appearance anymore in the scenes with him. This is not the way of an artist—say Tolstoy—who sees his character in his mind all the time and knows exactly the specific gesture he will employ at this or that moment. But there is something more striking still about Dostoyevsky.”

 

 

On Dostoevsky
Charles Block

"So 10th grade, Crime and Punishment. After school, I started reading along with the class for the first time.
     "It got even weirder, because the pawnbroker Raskolnikov murders is a gruff woman. She reminded me a little of my mother. I think of my mom as a very kind person, but she never wanted to be a pawnbroker. She used to say, Don't tell people what we do. She always said, Tell people your parents are in sales. She didn't want people to judge us, I guess. In any case, she wasn't really suited for it. She was a nervous person who could get upset easily, and she didn't enjoy being down there. She could really not be easy with the customers.
     "So as Dostoyevsky presented this woman, who acts gruffly towards Raskolnikov and treats him with suspicion, it was not too hard to see the parallels—and that made me feel kind of sick. It was so much like what I knew. And in that familiar setting, the worst nightmare takes place. The murder is so clearly and so cleanly described.
     Dostoyevsky is fairly bloodless about this. There's no melodrama—it's very plain description. One thing that was strange to me, back then, was that we actually care about Raskolnikov. We want him to get away with murder. I could tell, even then, that the whole point of the book is that you want him to get away this, that you're rooting for him.
     "But how was I supposed to do that?
     "Other sections of the book also got to me—especially the fact that, after killing and robbing the woman, Raskolnikov returns home and goes to sleep. That, I understood: It's what I do all the time. When I was fifteen and had my learner's permit, I drove my dad's car into a wall. Afterwards, I went home and got in bed and tried to hide. It's what I still do, even now, after any failure or bad thing—when my teeth hurt, or I'm trying to figure something out, or I'm at an impasse in my work, one of the things I do is take a nap. I consider myself one of the world's great nappers. I'll set my alarm for ten minutes, and I'm not sure if I fall asleep or not, but I sit there thinking and relax.
     "To see that someone knew the human condition this deeply. I remember thinking, how does Dostoyevsky know I do this? It had a profound effect on me. The writer of this book had somehow created intimate connections between my life in Las Vegas and 19th-century Russia. I understood, for the first time, that there is a deeper truth going on in fiction. I don't think it changed my everyday malaise, or my lostness. That wasn't going to change for a long time. But, I do think some larger doors started to open—in my understanding of what people can know, of what literature might be."

 

 

Empthy versus sympathy

"In 1909, the psychologist Edward Titchener translated the German Einfhlung ('feeling into') into English as empathy. Empathy can be defined as a person's ability to recognize and share the emotions of another person, fictional character, or sentient being. It involves, first, seeing someone else's situation from his perspective, and, second, sharing his emotions, including, if any, his distress.
     "For me to share in someone else's perspective, I must do more than merely put myself into his position. Instead, I must imagine myself as him, and, more than that, imagine myself as him in the particular situation in which he finds himself. I cannot empathize with an abstract or detached feeling. To empathize with a particular person, I need to have at least some knowledge of who he is and what he is doing or trying to do. As John Steinbeck wrote, 'It means very little to know that a million Chinese are starving unless you know one Chinese who is starving.'
     "Empathy is often confused with pity, sympathy, and compassion, which are each reactions to the plight of others. Pity is a feeling of discomfort at the distress of one or more sentient beings, and often has paternalistic or condescending overtones. Implicit in the notion of pity is that its object does not deserve its plight, and, moreover, is unable to prevent, reverse, or overturn it. Pity is less engaged than empathy, sympathy, or compassion, amounting to little more than a conscious acknowledgement of the plight of its object."

 

 

Russian modernist film
Man with a movie camera
Dziga Vertov

 

 

Russian stop-motion animation
Hedgehog in the fog
Yuri Norstein

October 2-6

Monday

 

 

 


 

Today. Bring Crime and Punishment and Degen. Our continued discussion of Crime and Punishment Parts 2 & 3. We'll continue following the moments of Raskolnikov's confrontation with himself and his ideas to understand his moral transformation. Have your list of annotated passaged ready.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION due. Paper in class, upload to assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION at both turnitin and peergrade by 15:30. Remove your name from peergrade copy if you like. See Essay submission on the policy page for details.

Tonight. Work on peergrade, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION, due Friday by 15:30. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 4. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Peergrade edit of Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION due Friday by 15:30. A participation grade.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT due Monday, October 16. See assignment details under Assignment due in middle column.

 

 

Tuesday

 

 

 


 

Today. Bring Crime and Punishment and Degen. Our continued discussion of Crime and Punishment Parts 2 & 3. We'll continue following the moments of Raskolnikov's confrontation with himself and his ideas to understand his moral transformation. Have your list of annotated passaged ready.

Tonight. Read these student ¶s. Evaluate TS, evidence, B, E in each. What would you do to each, were it your ¶?

Work on peergrade, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION, due Friday by 15:30. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

See quotations blending assignment due Monday, October 9.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 4. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Peergrade edit of Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION due Friday by 15:30. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT due Monday, October 16. See assignment details under Assignment due in middle column.

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. We'll look at some of your ¶s in class. No vocab. quiz.

Tonight. Work on peergrade edit, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION. I expect your comments to be specific, concrete, and rich. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 4. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Peergrade edit of Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL due Friday by 15:30. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT due Monday, October 16. See assignment details under Assignment due in middle column.

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Bring Crime and Punishment and Degen. Our continued discussion of Crime and Punishment Parts 2 & 3. We'll continue following the moments of Raskolnikov's confrontation with himself and his ideas to understand his moral transformation. Have your list of annotated passaged ready.

Tonight. Work on peergrade edit, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION. I expect your comments to be specific, concrete, and rich. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Ongoing. Crime and Punishment Part 4. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Peergrade edit of Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL due Friday by 15:30. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT due Monday, October 16. See assignment details under Assignment due in middle column.

 

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Volding on retreat. No class meeting today. You are to work on Peergrade, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION, due today by 15:30. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. No peergrade feedback breaks the reciprocal code.

Tonight. Your choice.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 4, due Monday. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book. I'll be checking them for a quiz.

Due Monday, October 9. Take your Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION and pay attention to the blending of your quotations and your topic string. Review the principles for blending quotations, found on Degen pages 192-96 and those about topic string in pages 217-20. Then improve the blending of your quotations and clarify your topic string. The main weakness I see in quote blending is B4, and I'm not seeing the concrete repetition of your topic string. Highlight the topic string throughout your ¶. Two quiz grades. Bring a paper copy to class.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT due Monday, October 16. See assignment details under Assignment due in middle column.
 

Assignments due
read them in full


Friday, October 6. Peergrade, Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION due by 15:30. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. Not to give feedback violates one of the fundamental principles that has made human society work: reciprocation, or the Golden Rule by another name. Read the Iliad sometime to see what happens when men forget reciprocal bonds. Agamemenon learns the hard way. Don't be Agamemnon. Treat your fellow students with honor and respect.

Monday, October 9. Take your Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION and pay attention to the blending of your quotations and your topic string. Review the principles for blending quotations, found on Degen pages 192-96 and those about topic string in pages 217-20. Then improve the blending of your quotations and clarify your topic string. The main weakness I see in quote blending is B4, and I'm not seeing the concrete repetition of your topic string. Highlight the topic string throughout your ¶. Two quiz grades. Bring a paper copy to class.

Monday, October 16. Crime and Punishment body ¶ REPEATED ELEMENT.
     Now that you've learned a bit more about writing body ¶s and written two, turn your practice to your repeated element and the upcoming essay on Crime and Punishment.
     Write the best, clearest, most interesting TH you can about how you're currently thinking about your repeataed element (RE). Look at several instances of your RE. Work from the page, noticing the clues Dostoevsky places there. What do you notice? What associations do you make, what thematic idea bubbles through them? What does RE tell you about that theme? Is your RE about love, about the power of noble feelings, about restoring the human community, about the dangers of intellect, the good of emotion? Find the theme and define what RE tells you about that theme. Knowing what RE says about theme will point you to a good TH, and a good TH is a lot. You shouldn't move forward until you're satisfied with your TH. That's step one.
     Step two is to define the topics your TH needs to cover. Ask yourself if developing a few instances of RE will be interesting and compelling. If so, define what each instance shows you about TH. Doing that points you to a series of TS. Be wise when choosing instances to discuss. You want them to reveal aspects of TH or to open up deeper stuff about TH. Once you've done this you have a conceptual outline of the essay.
     Your thinking will change as you continue to read, that's fine. Work with what you think now. Imagine an essay developing your TH and write at least three TS, the best you can now. Make those TS follow a clear focus reflecting how you're thinking about your TH from the novel. Are you looking at Raskolnikov's moments of rationalizing his justification for the murder? At Luzhin's utilitarian thinking? Whatever you're doing, your RE must be fairly concrete in the novel and your essay must develop TH/TS in a consistent way.
     Your task for Monday is to write one of the body ¶s of that essay. (You might use the ¶ in the final essay if it fits, but don't worry about that now. Focus on improving your body ¶ writing skills.) I want to see ever stronger TH and TS, a clearer topic string, better transitions and more elaboration of quotations, in phrases following the quotations—more LTR, in other words. Look specifically at something in the quotation, just as we've been doing in class.
     Continue using the ¶ on Degen page 54 and this one about Razumikhin as models.
     Think and write in your natural voice.
     Before your TH, define your RE; specifically indicate the ¶'s organization method and explain why/how the choice complements your TH/TS; then specifically identify the word that defines ¶'s topic string. Include your TH and the other TS you wrote and indicate where in the essay your developing ¶ belongs.
     Focus on editing marks TH (pages 224-25); TS (pages 220-23); P (pages 210-14); T (217-20); B (pages 192-96); and E (pages 198-202). Use Degen's concrete methods to improve your writing and thinking.
     Paper copy due in class. Follow MLA format for heading, citations, and works cited page; and use only Times New Roman font size 12. An essay grade. In addition to a paper copy—which you will give to me—also have access to the digital version. You will upload to peergrade and to turnitin at the beginning of class.
See Essay submission on the policy page for details. An essay grade.

Monday, October 9. Crime and Punishment Part 4. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development by noting the key moments he confronts himself, his thinking, the key moments of his change. They will be our focus. We will continue to track his progress chronologically through the novel.
     When you read, note in chronological order key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

 

 

Crime and Punishment
reading schedule

Review the vocabulary list before reading.

Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development and on the novel's moral themes. They will be our focus.

When you read, note key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Due September 25: Parts 2 & 3, pages 89-278.
Due October 9: Part 4, pages 281-358.
Due October 16: Part 5, pages 361-436.
Due October 23: Part 6 & Epilogue, pages 439-551.

 

 

Crime and Punishment vocab lists

Crime and Punishment Part 1 list
Crime and Punishment Part 2 list
Crime and Punishment Part 3 list
Crime and Punishment Part 4 list
Crime and Punishment Part 5 list
Crime and Punishment Part 6, Epilogue list
zipgrade student ids

 

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
LBH sentences crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good quesstions
MLA style center

 

 

Crime and Punishment essay

One of the most frequent and telling patterns in literature is repetition. Repetition clues us into what the author wants us to notice, what he or she thinks matters. As you continue to read Crime and Punishment, note some repeated element. You might see a word (one associated with a character, say), an image, a character's repeated action or thought, a setting, an allusion, a theme. See the list on page 94 in Degen. But be creative here. You might, for instance, choose something off the beaten track, comparing how Dostoevsky describes his characters, for instance, or the hidden clues in clothing. Don't think you need to slavishly follow my suggestions or Degen's list. Be open to growth, my friends. His questions for each category, are fine, but don't be limited to them. He lists some questions for each category, but don't be limited to them. Follow your own thinking and interests. Let your interest drive your thinking and writing. Remember the questions I asked you to write last week? Read this about asking good questions. And remember that literature shows you human truth.

You will devise your own topic by choosing one repeated element you find interesting, and over time discovering an interesting and insightful way of thinking about the repeated element. You will then define a way of organizing the essay, perhaps from those found in option two on pages 95-103 in Degen.

As you read the novel, record telling evidence about your repeated element, and do so in some organized way—front/back of your book; on paper; a doc; or using post-it notes or colored tabs. Notice what the novel's showing you about your element, what questions it prompts you to ask, what answers it offers. On each note record the questions you ask or the relevance you see to your category and cross reference examples as you go. The more you read, the more you should begin to find interesting questions and to enrich and clarify your thinking.

Read and think thematically. Here's a good introduction to theme. You will eventually link your repeated element to theme.

The patterns you discover and the questions you ask will lead you to an interesting thesis.

We'll finalize your topic and thesis later, in conference.

For this and all writing assignments, do no Googling or other research. Reading other people's ideas gets in the way of your own and often sends them packing. Who knows what you would have thought? Develop your own thinking and writing, your own ability to create a point of view. That matters more than you know. Use nothing other than your book, your class notes, and your own mind.

Crime and Punishment
reading links

 

Character list
Chronology of Part 1 and map of Petersburg
Sample annotated opening pages
What C & P can teach you that the internet can't
Archbishop Rowan Williams on Dostoevsky

Raskolnikov's St. Petersburg, map of his travels

Articles on Crime and Punishment
Dostoevsky's empathy
Is reason always wrong? Kant's Categorical Imperative
Kant and Hume on morality
Reverence by Paul Woodruff
Paul Woodruff talks to Bill Moyers
A few words about plot by Justin Cronin
Crime and Punishment, a simple summary

 

 

Dostoevsky's characterization
Vladimir Nabokov

“Dostoyevsky characterizes his people through situation, through ethical matters, their psychological reactions, their inside ripples. After describing the looks of a character, he uses the old-fashioned device of not referring to his specific physical appearance anymore in the scenes with him. This is not the way of an artist—say Tolstoy—who sees his character in his mind all the time and knows exactly the specific gesture he will employ at this or that moment. But there is something more striking still about Dostoyevsky.”

 

 

On Dostoevsky
Charles Block

"So 10th grade, Crime and Punishment. After school, I started reading along with the class for the first time.
     "It got even weirder, because the pawnbroker Raskolnikov murders is a gruff woman. She reminded me a little of my mother. I think of my mom as a very kind person, but she never wanted to be a pawnbroker. She used to say, Don't tell people what we do. She always said, Tell people your parents are in sales. She didn't want people to judge us, I guess. In any case, she wasn't really suited for it. She was a nervous person who could get upset easily, and she didn't enjoy being down there. She could really not be easy with the customers.
     "So as Dostoyevsky presented this woman, who acts gruffly towards Raskolnikov and treats him with suspicion, it was not too hard to see the parallels—and that made me feel kind of sick. It was so much like what I knew. And in that familiar setting, the worst nightmare takes place. The murder is so clearly and so cleanly described.
     Dostoyevsky is fairly bloodless about this. There's no melodrama—it's very plain description. One thing that was strange to me, back then, was that we actually care about Raskolnikov. We want him to get away with murder. I could tell, even then, that the whole point of the book is that you want him to get away this, that you're rooting for him.
     "But how was I supposed to do that?
     "Other sections of the book also got to me—especially the fact that, after killing and robbing the woman, Raskolnikov returns home and goes to sleep. That, I understood: It's what I do all the time. When I was fifteen and had my learner's permit, I drove my dad's car into a wall. Afterwards, I went home and got in bed and tried to hide. It's what I still do, even now, after any failure or bad thing—when my teeth hurt, or I'm trying to figure something out, or I'm at an impasse in my work, one of the things I do is take a nap. I consider myself one of the world's great nappers. I'll set my alarm for ten minutes, and I'm not sure if I fall asleep or not, but I sit there thinking and relax.
     "To see that someone knew the human condition this deeply. I remember thinking, how does Dostoyevsky know I do this? It had a profound effect on me. The writer of this book had somehow created intimate connections between my life in Las Vegas and 19th-century Russia. I understood, for the first time, that there is a deeper truth going on in fiction. I don't think it changed my everyday malaise, or my lostness. That wasn't going to change for a long time. But, I do think some larger doors started to open—in my understanding of what people can know, of what literature might be."

 

 

Empthy versus sympathy

"In 1909, the psychologist Edward Titchener translated the German Einfhlung ('feeling into') into English as empathy. Empathy can be defined as a person's ability to recognize and share the emotions of another person, fictional character, or sentient being. It involves, first, seeing someone else's situation from his perspective, and, second, sharing his emotions, including, if any, his distress.
     "For me to share in someone else's perspective, I must do more than merely put myself into his position. Instead, I must imagine myself as him, and, more than that, imagine myself as him in the particular situation in which he finds himself. I cannot empathize with an abstract or detached feeling. To empathize with a particular person, I need to have at least some knowledge of who he is and what he is doing or trying to do. As John Steinbeck wrote, 'It means very little to know that a million Chinese are starving unless you know one Chinese who is starving.'
     "Empathy is often confused with pity, sympathy, and compassion, which are each reactions to the plight of others. Pity is a feeling of discomfort at the distress of one or more sentient beings, and often has paternalistic or condescending overtones. Implicit in the notion of pity is that its object does not deserve its plight, and, moreover, is unable to prevent, reverse, or overturn it. Pity is less engaged than empathy, sympathy, or compassion, amounting to little more than a conscious acknowledgement of the plight of its object."

 

 

Russian modernist film
Man with a movie camera
Dziga Vertov

 

 

Russian stop-motion animation
Hedgehog in the fog
Yuri Norstein

September 25-29

Monday

 

 

 


 

Today. Bring Crime and Punishment and Degen. Our beginning discussion of Crime and Punishment Parts 2 & 3. Let's review the novel's moral universe, defining some key terms and introducing one more, Sonya. What thematic context does the novel create? How do we use that context to define how we might think about Raskolnikov?

Then let's define some of the big questions for Parts 2 & 3. Write of few of those questions on the Parts 2 & 3 tab of the previously shared Google Sheet. Let's find some ways of thinking about those questions—by seeing how the novel shows those questions to us. Do we, for instance, look for how Raskolnikov emotionally and intellectually reacts to his crime, his guilt, people, and the world? Do we focus on Raskolniov and one other character? Do we look for big changes in how Raskolnikov thinks about his crime? We're always looking for how the novel shows us. We need only to follow the clues Dostoevsky puts on every page.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ due. Paper in class, upload to assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL at both turnitin and peergrade by 15:30. See Essay submission on the policy page for details.

Tonight. Work on peergrade edit, Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL.

Ongoing. Peergrade edit Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT due Saturday by 15:30. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION. Now that you've received feedback on your ¶, revise it not only to "correct" the marked "errors" but also to truly revise—by improving every aspect of the thinking and writing. Revision means re-seeing. Do that. By spadefuls. I especially want to see better transitions and more elaboration of quotations, in phrases following the quotations—more LTR, in other words. Due Monday, October 2. See details in Assignments due.

 

 

Tuesday

 

 

 


 

Today. Bring Crime and Punishment and Degen. Crime and Punishment discussion Part 2.

Tonight. Study for tomorrow's vocab. quiz, Crime and Punishment Part 3.

Work on peergrade edit, Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL. I expect your comments to be specific, concrete, and rich. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment.

Ongoing. Peergrade edit of Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL due Saturday by 15:30. A participation grade.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION. Now that you've received feedback on your ¶, revise it not only to "correct" the marked "errors" but also to truly revise—by improving every aspect of the thinking and writing. Revision means re-seeing. Do that. By spadefuls. I especially want to see better transitions and more elaboration of quotations, in phrases following the quotations—more LTR, in other words. Due Monday, October 2. See details in Assignments due.

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Vocab. quiz Crime and Punishment Part 3. Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL due for Kairogians.

Tonight. Follow Raskolnikov through Parts 2 & 3, noting some key moments that define his moral development. Find the moments when you see him learn something about himself or his ideas, about his humanity. What traits does he show? Why does he show those traits at those moments? Notice that the novel is forcing Raskolnikov to confront himself and his ideas—forcing him to change. Make a list of passages that chart his change. Tomorrow I will want to see a list of passages annotated.

Work on peergrade edit, Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL. I expect your comments to be specific, concrete, and rich. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment.

Ongoing. Peergrade edit of Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL due Saturday by 15:30. A participation grade.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION. Now that you've received feedback on your ¶, revise it not only to "correct" the marked "errors" but also to truly revise—by improving every aspect of the thinking and writing. Revision means re-seeing. Do that. By spadefuls. I especially want to see better transitions and more elaboration of quotations, in phrases following the quotations—more LTR, in other words. Due Monday, October 2. See details in Assignments due.

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Bring Crime and Punishment and Degen. Crime and Punishment discussion Part 3.

Tonight. Work on peergrade edit, Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL. I expect your comments to be specific, concrete, and rich. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment.

Ongoing. Peergrade edit of Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL due Saturday by 15:30. A participation grade.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION. Now that you've received feedback on your ¶, revise it not only to "correct" the marked "errors" but also to truly revise—by improving every aspect of the thinking and writing. Revision means re-seeing. Do that. By spadefuls. I especially want to see better transitions and more elaboration of quotations, in phrases following the quotations—more LTR, in other words. Due Monday, October 2. See details in Assignments due.

 

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Bring Degen and Crime and Punishment. Writing, B, E, grading notes in class; peergrade editing.

Peergrade edit of Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL due Saturday by 15:30. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment.

Tonight.

Ongoing. Due Monday. Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION. Now that you've received feedback on your ¶, revise it not only to "correct" the marked "errors" but also to truly revise—by improving every aspect of the thinking and writing. Revision means re-seeing. Do that. By spadefuls. I want to see a stronger TH and TS, a clear topic string, better transitions and more elaboration of quotations, in phrases following the quotations—more LTR, in other words. Look specifically at something in the quotation. Before your TH, I also want you to specifically indicate the organization method and the word that will define your topic string. Include your thesis and the other topic sentences you wrote and indicate where in the essay your developing ¶ belongs. Focus on editing marks TS and P, T4, B. Paper copy in class, upload to assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION at both peergrade and turnitin by 15:30. See Essay submission on the policy page for details. Follow MLA format for heading, citations, and works cited page; and use only Times New Roman font size 12. An essay grade.

Assignments due
read them in full


Wednesday, September 27. Vocab. quiz Crime and Punishment Part 3.

Monday, September 25 (Wednesday, September 27 for Kairogians). Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL. Include your thesis and the other topic sentences you wrote and indicate where in the essay your developing ¶ belongs. Focus on editing marks TS and P. Paper copy in class, upload to assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL at both peergrade and turnitin by 15:30. See Essay submission on the policy page for details. Follow MLA format for heading, citations, and works cited page; and use only Times New Roman font size 12. An essay grade. Here's a sample ¶. The ¶ on page 54 of Degen is a good model, too. Use the Day Three: Checking body ¶s list on page 248 as a basic revision checklist. And remember that all writing is practice and that no writing is perfect. Improvement, not perfection, is the goal. Writers must learn to follow Hamlet and "Let it work" (Hamlet 5.2.237).

Saturday, September 30. Peergrade, Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL due by 15:30. A participation grade. No peergrade feedback earns a zero for the whole assignment. Not to give feedback violates one of the fundamental principles that has made human society work: reciprocation, the Golden Rule by another name. Read the Iliad sometime to see what happens when men forget reciprocal bonds. Agamemenon learns the hard way. Don't be Agamemnon. Treat your fellow students with honor and respect.

Monday, October 2. Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION. Now that you've received feedback on your ¶, revise it not only to "correct" the marked "errors" but also to truly revise—by improving every aspect of the thinking and writing. Revision means re-seeing. Do that. By spadefuls. I want to see a stronger TH and TS, a clear topic string, better transitions and more elaboration of quotations, in phrases following the quotations—more LTR, in other words. Look specifically at something in the quotation. Before your TH, I also want you to specifically indicate the organization method and the word that will define your topic string. Include your thesis and the other topic sentences you wrote and indicate where in the essay your developing ¶ belongs. Focus on editing marks TS, P, T4, and B. Paper copy in class, upload to assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION at both peergrade and turnitin by 15:30. See Essay submission on the policy page for details. Follow MLA format for heading, citations, and works cited page; and use only Times New Roman font size 12. An essay grade.

Monday, October 2. Crime and Punishment Parts 2 & 3. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development and on the novel's moral themes. They will be our focus.

When you read, note in chronological order the key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes, and use L1, L2, L3 to practice analytical reading. Have your passages ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

 

 

Two extra extra-credit opps
for September

1. Compose a metapor or simile for Harvey. Before you begin, read about metaphor and simile at poetryfoundation.org.

2. You probably shouldn't judge a book by its cover, but the cover should offer some clue about the book. Take a look at the cover of Crime and Punishment and explain its relevance to the novel. Put your analytical voice to work, using Levels 1, 2, and 3. See more book cover designs here.

Choose one, which you can do in addition to a movie or poem.

 

 

Crime and Punishment
reading schedule

Review the vocabulary list before reading.

Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development and on the novel's moral themes. They will be our focus.

When you read, note key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Due September 25: Parts 2 & 3, pages 89-278.
Due October 9: Part 4, pages 281-358.
Due October 16: Part 5, pages 361-436.
Due October 23: Part 6 & Epilogue, pages 439-551.

 

 

Crime and Punishment vocab lists

Crime and Punishment Part 1 list
Crime and Punishment Part 2 list
Crime and Punishment Part 3 list
Crime and Punishment Part 4 list
Crime and Punishment Part 5 list
Crime and Punishment Part 6, Epilogue list
zipgrade student ids

 

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
LBH sentences crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good quesstions
MLA style center

 

 

Crime and Punishment essay

One of the most frequent and telling patterns in literature is repetition. Repetition clues us into what the author wants us to notice, what he or she thinks matters. As you continue to read Crime and Punishment, note some repeated element. You might see a word (one associated with a character, say), an image, a character's repeated action or thought, a setting, an allusion, a theme. See the list on page 94 in Degen. But be creative here. You might, for instance, choose something off the beaten track, comparing how Dostoevsky describes his characters, for instance, or the hidden clues in clothing. Don't think you need to slavishly follow my suggestions or Degen's list. Be open to growth, my friends. His questions for each category, are fine, but don't be limited to them. He lists some questions for each category, but don't be limited to them. Follow your own thinking and interests. Let your interest drive your thinking and writing. Remember the questions I asked you to write last week? Read this about asking good questions. And remember that literature shows you human truth.

You will devise your own topic by choosing one repeated element you find interesting, and over time discovering an interesting and insightful way of thinking about the repeated element. You will then define a way of organizing the essay, perhaps from those found in option two on pages 95-103 in Degen.

As you read the novel, record telling evidence about your repeated element, and do so in some organized way—front/back of your book; on paper; a doc; or using post-it notes or colored tabs. Notice what the novel's showing you about your element, what questions it prompts you to ask, what answers it offers. On each note record the questions you ask or the relevance you see to your category and cross reference examples as you go. The more you read, the more you should begin to find interesting questions and to enrich and clarify your thinking.

Read and think thematically. Here's a good introduction to theme. You will eventually link your repeated element to theme.

The patterns you discover and the questions you ask will lead you to an interesting thesis.

We'll finalize your topic and thesis later, in conference.

For this and all writing assignments, do no Googling or other research. Reading other people's ideas gets in the way of your own and often sends them packing. Who knows what you would have thought? Develop your own thinking and writing, your own ability to create a point of view. That matters more than you know. Use nothing other than your book, your class notes, and your own mind.

Crime and Punishment
reading links

 

Character list
Chronology of Part 1 and map of Petersburg
Sample annotated opening pages
What C & P can teach you that the internet can't
Archbishop Rowan Williams on Dostoevsky

Raskolnikov's St. Petersburg, map of his travels

Articles on Crime and Punishment
Dostoevsky's empathy
Is reason always wrong? Kant's Categorical Imperative
Kant and Hume on morality
Reverence by Paul Woodruff
Paul Woodruff talks to Bill Moyers
A few words about plot by Justin Cronin

 

 

Dostoevsky's characterization
Vladimir Nabokov

“Dostoyevsky characterizes his people through situation, through ethical matters, their psychological reactions, their inside ripples. After describing the looks of a character, he uses the old-fashioned device of not referring to his specific physical appearance anymore in the scenes with him. This is not the way of an artist—say Tolstoy—who sees his character in his mind all the time and knows exactly the specific gesture he will employ at this or that moment. But there is something more striking still about Dostoyevsky.”

 

 

On Dostoevsky
Charles Block

"So 10th grade, Crime and Punishment. After school, I started reading along with the class for the first time.
     "It got even weirder, because the pawnbroker Raskolnikov murders is a gruff woman. She reminded me a little of my mother. I think of my mom as a very kind person, but she never wanted to be a pawnbroker. She used to say, Don't tell people what we do. She always said, Tell people your parents are in sales. She didn't want people to judge us, I guess. In any case, she wasn't really suited for it. She was a nervous person who could get upset easily, and she didn't enjoy being down there. She could really not be easy with the customers.
     "So as Dostoyevsky presented this woman, who acts gruffly towards Raskolnikov and treats him with suspicion, it was not too hard to see the parallels—and that made me feel kind of sick. It was so much like what I knew. And in that familiar setting, the worst nightmare takes place. The murder is so clearly and so cleanly described.
     Dostoyevsky is fairly bloodless about this. There's no melodrama—it's very plain description. One thing that was strange to me, back then, was that we actually care about Raskolnikov. We want him to get away with murder. I could tell, even then, that the whole point of the book is that you want him to get away this, that you're rooting for him.
     "But how was I supposed to do that?
     "Other sections of the book also got to me—especially the fact that, after killing and robbing the woman, Raskolnikov returns home and goes to sleep. That, I understood: It's what I do all the time. When I was fifteen and had my learner's permit, I drove my dad's car into a wall. Afterwards, I went home and got in bed and tried to hide. It's what I still do, even now, after any failure or bad thing—when my teeth hurt, or I'm trying to figure something out, or I'm at an impasse in my work, one of the things I do is take a nap. I consider myself one of the world's great nappers. I'll set my alarm for ten minutes, and I'm not sure if I fall asleep or not, but I sit there thinking and relax.
     "To see that someone knew the human condition this deeply. I remember thinking, how does Dostoyevsky know I do this? It had a profound effect on me. The writer of this book had somehow created intimate connections between my life in Las Vegas and 19th-century Russia. I understood, for the first time, that there is a deeper truth going on in fiction. I don't think it changed my everyday malaise, or my lostness. That wasn't going to change for a long time. But, I do think some larger doors started to open—in my understanding of what people can know, of what literature might be."

 

 

Empthy versus sympathy

"In 1909, the psychologist Edward Titchener translated the German Einfhlung ('feeling into') into English as empathy. Empathy can be defined as a person's ability to recognize and share the emotions of another person, fictional character, or sentient being. It involves, first, seeing someone else's situation from his perspective, and, second, sharing his emotions, including, if any, his distress.
     "For me to share in someone else's perspective, I must do more than merely put myself into his position. Instead, I must imagine myself as him, and, more than that, imagine myself as him in the particular situation in which he finds himself. I cannot empathize with an abstract or detached feeling. To empathize with a particular person, I need to have at least some knowledge of who he is and what he is doing or trying to do. As John Steinbeck wrote, 'It means very little to know that a million Chinese are starving unless you know one Chinese who is starving.'
     "Empathy is often confused with pity, sympathy, and compassion, which are each reactions to the plight of others. Pity is a feeling of discomfort at the distress of one or more sentient beings, and often has paternalistic or condescending overtones. Implicit in the notion of pity is that its object does not deserve its plight, and, moreover, is unable to prevent, reverse, or overturn it. Pity is less engaged than empathy, sympathy, or compassion, amounting to little more than a conscious acknowledgement of the plight of its object."

 

 

Russian modernist film
Man with a movie camera
Dziga Vertov

 

 

Russian stop-motion animation
Hedgehog in the fog
Yuri Norstein

September 18-22

Monday

 

 

 


 

Today. Learn editing symbol TS. Study Degen 54-55 and 220-23. Review sample ¶ page 54 and label L1, L2, L3 evidence and thinking to see how a ¶ works; consider ¶ development; review your ¶ TS.

By the end of class today you should know editing symbol TS and all of its components; ¶ unity and coherence; ¶ development basics. You should see ways to improve the TS of your ¶.

Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT due to peergrade assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT today by 15:30. Remove your name from the upload. Peergrade hand-in closes at 15:30. Upload, editing, response a participation grade.

Tonight. Read Trimble, Writing with Style chapters 1 & 2. Learn some thinking basics and some additional drafting strategies.

Ongoing. Peergrade edit Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT due Friday by 15:30. A participation grade.

Be reading Crime and Punishment Parts 2 & 3 and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development and on the novel's moral themes. They will be our focus.

When you read, note key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes, and use L1, L2, L3 to practice analytical reading. Have your passages ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

 

 

Tuesday

 

 

 


 

Today. ¶ drafting strategy one, organization method. Learn editing symbol P. Review Trimble chapters 1 & 2. Study Degen 59-64; 210-14.

By the end of class today you should know some concrete thinking and drafting basics and understand the edting symbol P 1-4 and have begun to apply that knowledge to your Crime and Punishment ¶.

Tonight. Study for tomorrow's vocab. quiz, Crime and Punishment Part 2. Work on peergrade edit Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Parts 2 & 3 and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development and on the novel's moral themes. They will be our focus.

When you read, note key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes, and use L1, L2, L3 to practice analytical reading. Have your passages ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Peergrade edit Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT due Friday by 15:30.

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. Vocab. quiz Crime and Punishment Part 2.

Tonight. Work on peergrade edit Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Parts 2 & 3 and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development and on the novel's moral themes. They will be our focus.

When you read, note key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes, and use L1, L2, L3 to practice analytical reading. Have your passages ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Peergrade edit Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT due Friday by 15:30.

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. ¶ drafting strategy 2, transitions. Learn editing symbol A. Study Degen 64-66; 189-92.

By the end of class today you should know several concrete strategies for using transitions in your writing and have begun to apply them to your Crime and Punishment ¶.

Tonight. Work on peergrade edit Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Parts 2 & 3 and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development and on the novel's moral themes. They will be our focus.

When you read, note key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes, and use L1, L2, L3 to practice analytical reading. Have your passages ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Peergrade edit Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT due Friday by 15:30.

 

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

 

Today. ¶ drafting strategy 3, maintain topic string. Learn editing symbols T, B, and E. Study Degen 66-71; 217-20; 192-96; 198-202.

Peergrade edit Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT due by 15:30 today. Peergrade editing closes today at 15:30.

Tonight. Take a break.

Monday. Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL due. Include your thesis and the other topic sentences you wrote and indicate where in the essay your developing ¶ belongs. Focus on editing marks TS and P. Paper copy in class, upload to assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL at both peergrade and turnitin by 15:30. See Essay submission on the policy page for details. Follow MLA format for heading, citations, and works cited page; and use only Times New Roman font size 12. An essay grade. Here's a sample ¶. The ¶ on page 54 of Degen is a good model, too. Use the Day Three: Checking body ¶s list on page 248 as a basic revision checklist. And remember that all writing is practice and that no writing is perfect. Improvement, not perfection, is the goal. Writers must learn to follow Hamlet and "Let it work." (Hamlet 5.2.237).

Crime and Punishment Parts 2 & 3 due.

Ongoing. Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 4 and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development and on the novel's moral themes, and use L1, L2, L3 to practice analytical reading.. They will be our focus.

When you read, note key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes, and use L1, L2, L3 to practice analytical reading. Have your passages ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Assignments due

 

Wednesday, September 20. Vocab. quiz Crime and Punishment Part 2.

Friday, September 22 by 15:30. Peergrade editing of Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT. Part of the participation grade.

Monday, September 25 (Wednesday, September 27 for Kairogians). Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL. Include your thesis and the other topic sentences you wrote and indicate where in the essay your developing ¶ belongs. Focus on editing marks TS and P. Paper copy in class, upload to assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL at both peergrade and turnitin by 15:30. See Essay submission on the policy page for details. Follow MLA format for heading, citations, and works cited page; and use only Times New Roman font size 12. An essay grade. Here's a sample ¶. The ¶ on page 54 of Degen is a good model, too. Use the Day Three: Checking body ¶s list on page 248 as a basic revision checklist. And remember that all writing is practice and that no writing is perfect. Improvement, not perfection, is the goal. Writers must learn to follow Hamlet and "Let it work" (Hamlet 5.2.237).

Monday, September 25. Crime and Punishment Parts 2 & 3. Be tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development and on the novel's moral themes. They will be our focus.

When you read, note key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes, and use L1, L2, L3 to practice analytical reading. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

 

 

Two extra extra-credit opps
for September

1. Compose a metapor or simile for Harvey. Before you begin, read about metaphor and simile at poetryfoundation.org.

2. You probably shouldn't judge a book by its cover, but the cover should offer some clue about the book. Take a look at the cover of Crime and Punishment and explain its relevance to the novel. Put your analytical voice to work, using Levels 1, 2, and 3. See more book cover designs here.

Choose one, which you can do in addition to a movie or poem.

 

 

Crime and Punishment
reading schedule

Review the vocabulary list before reading.

Keep noting your repeated element. But also keep your eye on Raskolnikov's moral development and on the novel's moral themes. They will be our focus.

When you read, note key passages about Raskolnikov and the novel's moral themes. Have them ready in a list in your notebook and annotated in your book.

Due September 25: Parts 2 & 3, pages 89-278.
Due October 2: Part 4, pages 281-358.
Due October 9: Part 5, pages 361-436.
Due October 16: Part 6 & Epilogue, pages 439-551.

 

 

Crime and Punishment vocab lists

Crime and Punishment Part 1 list
Crime and Punishment Part 2 list
Crime and Punishment Part 3 list
Crime and Punishment Part 4 list
Crime and Punishment Part 5 list
Crime and Punishment Part 6, Epilogue list
zipgrade student ids

 

 

Essay documents

Grading notes
Essay editing marks, with explanations
LBH sentences crafting packet
LBH punctuation packet
Essay rubric, technical
Essay rubric, conceptual
Asking good quesstions
MLA style center

 

 

Crime and Punishment essay

One of the most frequent and telling patterns in literature is repetition. Repetition clues us into what the author wants us to notice, what he or she thinks matters. As you continue to read Crime and Punishment, note some repeated element. You might see a word (one associated with a character, say), an image, a character's repeated action or thought, a setting, an allusion, a theme. See the list on page 94 in Degen. But be creative here. You might, for instance, choose something off the beaten track, comparing how Dostoevsky describes his characters, for instance, or the hidden clues in clothing. Don't think you need to slavishly follow my suggestions or Degen's list. Be open to growth, my friends. His questions for each category, are fine, but don't be limited to them. He lists some questions for each category, but don't be limited to them. Follow your own thinking and interests. Let your interest drive your thinking and writing. Remember the questions I asked you to write last week? Read this about asking good questions. And remember that literature shows you human truth.

You will devise your own topic by choosing one repeated element you find interesting, and over time discovering an interesting and insightful way of thinking about the repeated element. You will then define a way of organizing the essay, perhaps from those found in option two on pages 95-103 in Degen.

As you read the novel, record telling evidence about your repeated element, and do so in some organized way—front/back of your book; on paper; a doc; or using post-it notes or colored tabs. Notice what the novel's showing you about your element, what questions it prompts you to ask, what answers it offers. On each note record the questions you ask or the relevance you see to your category and cross reference examples as you go. The more you read, the more you should begin to find interesting questions and to enrich and clarify your thinking.

Read and think thematically. Here's a good introduction to theme. You will eventually link your repeated element to theme.

The patterns you discover and the questions you ask will lead you to an interesting thesis.

We'll finalize your topic and thesis later, in conference.

For this and all writing assignments, do no Googling or other research. Reading other people's ideas gets in the way of your own and often sends them packing. Who knows what you would have thought? Develop your own thinking and writing, your own ability to create a point of view. That matters more than you know. Use nothing other than your book, your class notes, and your own mind.

 

 

Russian stop-motion animation
Hedgehog in the fog
Yuri Norstein

Crime and Punishment
reading links

 

Character list
Chronology of Part 1 and map of Petersburg
Sample annotated opening pages
What C & P can teach you that the internet can't
Archbishop Rowan Williams on Dostoevsky

Raskolnikov's St. Petersburg, map of his travels

Articles on Crime and Punishment
Dostoevsky's empathy
Is reason always wrong? Kant's Categorical Imperative
Kant and Hume on morality
Reverence by Paul Woodruff
Paul Woodruff talks to Bill Moyers
A few words about plot by Justin Cronin

 

 

Dostoevsky's characterization
Vladimir Nabokov

“Dostoyevsky characterizes his people through situation, through ethical matters, their psychological reactions, their inside ripples. After describing the looks of a character, he uses the old-fashioned device of not referring to his specific physical appearance anymore in the scenes with him. This is not the way of an artist—say Tolstoy—who sees his character in his mind all the time and knows exactly the specific gesture he will employ at this or that moment. But there is something more striking still about Dostoyevsky.”

 

 

On Dostoevsky
Charles Block

"So 10th grade, Crime and Punishment. After school, I started reading along with the class for the first time.
     "It got even weirder, because the pawnbroker Raskolnikov murders is a gruff woman. She reminded me a little of my mother. I think of my mom as a very kind person, but she never wanted to be a pawnbroker. She used to say, Don't tell people what we do. She always said, Tell people your parents are in sales. She didn't want people to judge us, I guess. In any case, she wasn't really suited for it. She was a nervous person who could get upset easily, and she didn't enjoy being down there. She could really not be easy with the customers.
     "So as Dostoyevsky presented this woman, who acts gruffly towards Raskolnikov and treats him with suspicion, it was not too hard to see the parallels—and that made me feel kind of sick. It was so much like what I knew. And in that familiar setting, the worst nightmare takes place. The murder is so clearly and so cleanly described.
     Dostoyevsky is fairly bloodless about this. There's no melodrama—it's very plain description. One thing that was strange to me, back then, was that we actually care about Raskolnikov. We want him to get away with murder. I could tell, even then, that the whole point of the book is that you want him to get away this, that you're rooting for him.
     "But how was I supposed to do that?
     "Other sections of the book also got to me—especially the fact that, after killing and robbing the woman, Raskolnikov returns home and goes to sleep. That, I understood: It's what I do all the time. When I was fifteen and had my learner's permit, I drove my dad's car into a wall. Afterwards, I went home and got in bed and tried to hide. It's what I still do, even now, after any failure or bad thing—when my teeth hurt, or I'm trying to figure something out, or I'm at an impasse in my work, one of the things I do is take a nap. I consider myself one of the world's great nappers. I'll set my alarm for ten minutes, and I'm not sure if I fall asleep or not, but I sit there thinking and relax.
     "To see that someone knew the human condition this deeply. I remember thinking, how does Dostoyevsky know I do this? It had a profound effect on me. The writer of this book had somehow created intimate connections between my life in Las Vegas and 19th-century Russia. I understood, for the first time, that there is a deeper truth going on in fiction. I don't think it changed my everyday malaise, or my lostness. That wasn't going to change for a long time. But, I do think some larger doors started to open—in my understanding of what people can know, of what literature might be."

 

 

Empthy versus sympathy

"In 1909, the psychologist Edward Titchener translated the German Einfhlung ('feeling into') into English as empathy. Empathy can be defined as a person's ability to recognize and share the emotions of another person, fictional character, or sentient being. It involves, first, seeing someone else's situation from his perspective, and, second, sharing his emotions, including, if any, his distress.
     "For me to share in someone else's perspective, I must do more than merely put myself into his position. Instead, I must imagine myself as him, and, more than that, imagine myself as him in the particular situation in which he finds himself. I cannot empathize with an abstract or detached feeling. To empathize with a particular person, I need to have at least some knowledge of who he is and what he is doing or trying to do. As John Steinbeck wrote, 'It means very little to know that a million Chinese are starving unless you know one Chinese who is starving.'
     "Empathy is often confused with pity, sympathy, and compassion, which are each reactions to the plight of others. Pity is a feeling of discomfort at the distress of one or more sentient beings, and often has paternalistic or condescending overtones. Implicit in the notion of pity is that its object does not deserve its plight, and, moreover, is unable to prevent, reverse, or overturn it. Pity is less engaged than empathy, sympathy, or compassion, amounting to little more than a conscious acknowledgement of the plight of its object."

 

 

Russian modernist film
Man with a movie camera
Dziga Vertov

September 11-15

Monday

 

 

 


 

This week we'll regroup and begin actually discussing Crime and Punishment Part 1. Bring the questions you wrote some time ago. We'll also introduce developing an analytical voice from Degen.

So on Monday, bring Crime and Punishment and Degen. We'll discuss Part 1 chapters 1 & 2.

The work of next week: Body ¶ writing. Bring Degen, Dostoevsky We'll learn some solid ¶-writing skills you can directly apply to your own ¶.

The week's assignments are those of last week. But I have changed the due dates for the writing, the vocab. practice, and the reading schedule of Crime and Punishment.

Here's what we would have covered last week, or most of it. I've not included the material about developing an analytical voice.

Continue reading Crime and Punishment Part 3. See the new Crime and Punishment reading schedule in the middle column.

The quiz over Part 2 happens Tuesday, September 12, though we'll not begin discussing Part 2 until next week. See the newly revised reading schedule. You should now be able to read comfortably ahead of schedule.

The body ¶ DRAFT is due Friday, September 15, with the same expectations. See the assignment beneath Assignments due.

The body ¶ FINAL is due Monday, September 18. See the assignment beneath Assignments due. Make special note of the format requirements. Learn how to write the proper MLA citation at the MLA style center. See link beneath Essay documents in the middle column.

That said, it would be really helpful if you have read about ¶ writing on your own. Last week we would have covered Degen chapter 3, pages 53-88, learning the editing symbols TS, E, P1, A1, A2, A3, T1; and B1, B2, B3 on pages 192-196. More explanations and examples for the editing symbols in Chapter 6.

That's a lot of information, but you're familiar with some of it already, and the concepts are pretty concrete. Learn the principles and practice using them as you draft your body ¶ DRAFT.

We'll cover that material this week, quickly, I hope.

Just as I didn't follow everything Degen said about TH, I don't follow or even endorse everything he says about the new writing concepts. He likes fluffy, overblown writing in a way I and most college professors don't; and he favors a general way of thinking and writing that I and college professors don't. I want you to be specific, precise, and concrete, to think from evidence in a way Degen doesn't. I want you to show your thinking more fully and precisely than his models show.

But the writing 101 concepts he covers are solid and the stuff of good witing here and everywhere. Learn them and empower your writing. Forever.

Also begin reviewing and learning Crime and Punishment vocab. list 2, linked in the middle column under Crime and Punishment vocab lists. We'll have a quiz the week after next. You'd be smart to review the words and to learn them as you read. The practice for list 2 is due Friday, September 15 by 22:59 for a participation grade.

See the newly revised Crime and Punishment essay assignment. I've specified and focused it some, while still allowing wide latitude of exact topic and approach. I hope I've guided you more clearly, not stifled your interest or creativity.

Be reading Crime and Punishment Parts 2 & 3 and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here.

 

 

Tuesday

 

 

 


 

Crime and Punishment quiz Part 2 due in class today. Paper copy, following MLA guidelines for heading, intext citation, works cited. Use only Times New Roman font size 12. Upload to turnitin assignment QUIZ, Crime and Punishment Part 2 due by 15:30. See Essay submission on the policy page.

Crime and Punishment Part 1 chapters 3 & 4 discussion.

Be reading Crime and Punishment Parts 2 & 3 and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. See the Crime and Punishment essay assignment for details and examples. If you've not read that assignment—in full—then you've not done what you should have.

Is this why you go to college?

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

 

 

 

Vocab. quiz Crime and Punishment Part 2 today in class. Just kidding. We'll reschedule it for next week.

Crime and Punishment Part 1 discussion in class, if time allows. Hey, with no quiz, it will!

Be reading Crime and Punishment Parts 2 & 3 and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. See the Crime and Punishment essay assignment for details and examples. If you've not read that assignment—in full—then you've not done what you should have.

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

Crime and Punishment Part 1 chapters 5 & 6 discussion in class.

Be reading Crime and Punishment Parts 2 & 3 and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. See the Crime and Punishment essay assignment for details and examples. If you've not read that assignment—in full—then you've not done what you should have.

 

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

 

Crime and Punishment Part 1 chapter 7 discussion in class.

Be reading Crime and Punishment Parts 2 & 3 and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here. See the Crime and Punishment essay assignment for details and examples. If you've not read that assignment—in full—then you've not done what you should have

Body ¶ DRAFT due Monday by 15:30 to peergrade assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT. Follow MLA guidelines for heading, in-text citation, and works cited. (Use the MLA style center website here.) Use only Times New Roman font size 12. Remove your name from the draft. Draft upload, editing, and response all a participation grade.

Bring two paper copies of your draft with you to class on Monday.

Assignments due

Hiroshige,_Sudden_shower_over_Shin-œhashi_bridge_and_Atake,_1857

 

Tuesday, September 12. Quiz Crime and Punishment Part 2. I've asked you to begin reading with a purpose and to track a repeated element you find interesting and to collect evidence. The quiz will ask you to tell me about that something in Part 2 in ¶ form. Bring your ¶ response to class on Tuesday. Follow MLA guidelines for heading, in-text citation, works cited. Use only Times New Roman font size 12. Upload to turnitin assignment QUIZ, Crime and Punishment Part 2 due by 15:30. See Essay submission on the policy page.

Wednesday, September 20. Vocab. quiz Crime and Punishment Part 2.

Monday, September 18 by 8. Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT due to peer grade assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT by 15:30. Use the thesis you wrote—or an improved one—to develop a series of topic sentences. Choose one of those topic sentences and write one body ¶. Focus on the writing concepts we have studied: TS, E, P1, A1, A2, A3, T1, B1, B2, B3. Include your thesis above the body ¶ and remove your name from the heading. A participation grade counting upload, feedback, and responding to feedback.

Friday, September 22 by 15:30. Peergrade editing of Crime and Punishment body ¶. Part of the participation grade.

Monday, September 25. Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL. Paper copy in class, upload to assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL at both peergrade and turnitin by 15:30. See Essay submission on the policy page for details. Follow MLA format for heading, citations, and works cited page; and use only Times New Roman font.

 

 

Two extra extra-credit opps
for September

1. Compose a metapor or simile for Harvey. Before you begin, read about metaphor and simile at poetryfoundation.org.

2. You probably shouldn't judge a book by its cover, but the cover should offer some clue about the book. Take a look at the cover of Crime and Punishment and explain its relevance to the novel. Put your analytical voice to work, using Levels 1, 2, and 3. See more book cover designs here.

Choose one, which you can do in addition to a movie or poem.

 

 

Crime and Punishment
reading schedule

Review the vocabulary list before reading.

And be noting your repeated element.

Due September 25: Parts 2 & 3, pages 89-278.
Due October 2: Part 4, pages 281-358.
Due October 9: Part 5, pages 361-436.
Due October 16: Part 6 & Epilogue, pages 439-551.

 

 

Crime and Punishment vocab lists

Crime and Punishment Part 1 list
Crime and Punishment Part 2 list
Crime and Punishment Part 3 list
Crime and Punishment Part 4 list
Crime and Punishment Part 5 list
Crime and Punishment Part 6, Epilogue list
zipgrade student ids

 

 

Essay documents

Grading notes

Essay editing marks, with explanations

See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight

LBH sentence crafting packet

LBH punctuation packet

Essay rubric, technical

Essay rubric, conceptual

Asking good questions

MLA style center

 

 

Crime and Punishment essay

One of the most frequent and telling patterns in literature is repetition. Repetition clues us into what the author wants us to notice, what he or she thinks matters. As you continue to read Crime and Punishment, note some repeated element. You might see a word (one associated with a character, say), an image, a character's repeated action or thought, a setting, an allusion, a theme. See the list on page 94 in Degen. But be creative here. You might, for instance, choose something off the beaten track, comparing how Dostoevsky describes his characters, for instance, or the hidden clues in clothing. Don't think you need to slavishly follow my suggestions or Degen's list. Be open to growth, my friends. His questions for each category, are fine, but don't be limited to them. He lists some questions for each category, but don't be limited to them. Follow your own thinking and interests. Let your interest drive your thinking and writing. Remember the questions I asked you to write last week? Read this about asking good questions. And remember that literature shows you human truth.

You will devise your own topic by choosing one repeated element you find interesting, and over time discovering an interesting and insightful way of thinking about the repeated element. You will then define a way of organizing the essay, perhaps from those found in option two on pages 95-103 in Degen.

As you read the novel, record telling evidence about your repeated element, and do so in some organized way—front/back of your book; on paper; a doc; or using post-it notes or colored tabs. Notice what the novel's showing you about your element, what questions it prompts you to ask, what answers it offers. On each note record the questions you ask or the relevance you see to your category and cross reference examples as you go. The more you read, the more you should begin to find interesting questions and to enrich and clarify your thinking.

Read and think thematically. Here's a good introduction to theme. You will eventually link your repeated element to theme.

The patterns you discover and the questions you ask will lead you to an interesting thesis.

We'll finalize your topic and thesis later, in conference.

For this and all writing assignments, do no Googling or other research. Reading other people's ideas gets in the way of your own and often sends them packing. Who knows what you would have thought? Develop your own thinking and writing, your own ability to create a point of view. That matters more than you know. Use nothing other than your book, your class notes, and your own mind.

 

 


 

Crime and Punishment
reading links

 

Character list

Chronology of Part 1 and map of Petersburg

Sample annotated opening pages

What C & P can teach you that the internet can't

Archbishop Rowan Williams on Dostoevsky

Raskolnikov's St. Petersburg, map of his travels

Articles on Crime and Punishment

Dostoevsky's empathy

Kenosis

Reverence by Paul Woodruff

Paul Woodruff talks to Bill Moyers

A few words about plot by Justin Cronin

 

 

For September 11
On the Transmigration of Souls
John Adams

 

 

Dostoevsky's characterization
Vladimir Nabokov

“Dostoyevsky characterizes his people through situation, through ethical matters, their psychological reactions, their inside ripples. After describing the looks of a character, he uses the old-fashioned device of not referring to his specific physical appearance anymore in the scenes with him. This is not the way of an artist—say Tolstoy—who sees his character in his mind all the time and knows exactly the specific gesture he will employ at this or that moment. But there is something more striking still about Dostoyevsky.”

 

 

On Dostoevsky
Charles Block

"So 10th grade, Crime and Punishment. After school, I started reading along with the class for the first time.
     "It got even weirder, because the pawnbroker Raskolnikov murders is a gruff woman. She reminded me a little of my mother. I think of my mom as a very kind person, but she never wanted to be a pawnbroker. She used to say, Don't tell people what we do. She always said, Tell people your parents are in sales. She didn't want people to judge us, I guess. In any case, she wasn't really suited for it. She was a nervous person who could get upset easily, and she didn't enjoy being down there. She could really not be easy with the customers.
     "So as Dostoyevsky presented this woman, who acts gruffly towards Raskolnikov and treats him with suspicion, it was not too hard to see the parallels—and that made me feel kind of sick. It was so much like what I knew. And in that familiar setting, the worst nightmare takes place. The murder is so clearly and so cleanly described.
     Dostoyevsky is fairly bloodless about this. There's no melodrama—it's very plain description. One thing that was strange to me, back then, was that we actually care about Raskolnikov. We want him to get away with murder. I could tell, even then, that the whole point of the book is that you want him to get away this, that you're rooting for him.
     "But how was I supposed to do that?
     "Other sections of the book also got to me—especially the fact that, after killing and robbing the woman, Raskolnikov returns home and goes to sleep. That, I understood: It's what I do all the time. When I was fifteen and had my learner's permit, I drove my dadÕs car into a wall. Afterwards, I went home and got in bed and tried to hide. It's what I still do, even now, after any failure or bad thing—when my teeth hurt, or I'm trying to figure something out, or I'm at an impasse in my work, one of the things I do is take a nap. I consider myself one of the world's great nappers. I'll set my alarm for ten minutes, and I'm not sure if I fall asleep or not, but I sit there thinking and relax.
     "To see that someone knew the human condition this deeply. I remember thinking, how does Dostoyevsky know I do this? It had a profound effect on me. The writer of this book had somehow created intimate connections between my life in Las Vegas and 19th-century Russia. I understood, for the first time, that there is a deeper truth going on in fiction. I don't think it changed my everyday malaise, or my lostness. That wasn't going to change for a long time. But, I do think some larger doors started to open—in my understanding of what people can know, of what literature might be."

 

 

Empthy versus sympathy

"In 1909, the psychologist Edward Titchener translated the German Einfhlung ('feeling into') into English as empathy. Empathy can be defined as a person's ability to recognize and share the emotions of another person, fictional character, or sentient being. It involves, first, seeing someone else's situation from his perspective, and, second, sharing his emotions, including, if any, his distress.
     "For me to share in someone else's perspective, I must do more than merely put myself into his position. Instead, I must imagine myself as him, and, more than that, imagine myself as him in the particular situation in which he finds himself. I cannot empathize with an abstract or detached feeling. To empathize with a particular person, I need to have at least some knowledge of who he is and what he is doing or trying to do. As John Steinbeck wrote, 'It means very little to know that a million Chinese are starving unless you know one Chinese who is starving.'
     "Empathy is often confused with pity, sympathy, and compassion, which are each reactions to the plight of others. Pity is a feeling of discomfort at the distress of one or more sentient beings, and often has paternalistic or condescending overtones. Implicit in the notion of pity is that its object does not deserve its plight, and, moreover, is unable to prevent, reverse, or overturn it. Pity is less engaged than empathy, sympathy, or compassion, amounting to little more than a conscious acknowledgement of the plight of its object."

August 28-September 1, the lost week of Harvey

Monday

 

 

 

 

 

No classes today.

Not since Hurricane Ike in 2008 has the school canceled a week of classes. That storm was bad, too, but not as bad as Harvey, maybe.

Here's what we would have covered this week, or most of it. I've not included the material about developing an analytical voice.

Continue reading Crime and Punishment. We don't have time to wait, really. So we'll move ahead with Part 2 next week as planned.

The quiz over Part 2 still happens Tuesday, September 5.

The body ¶ DRAFT is postponed to Friday, September 8, with the same expectations. See the assignment beneath Assignments due.

The body ¶ FINAL is due Monday, September 11. See the assignment beneath Assignments due. Make special note of the format requirements. Learn how to write the proper MLA citation at the MLA style center. See link beneath Essay documents in the middle column.

That said, it would be really helpful if you could read about ¶ writing on your own. We would have covered Degen chapter 3, pages 53-88, learning the editing symbols TS, E, P1, A1, A2, A3, T1; and B1, B2, B3 on pages 192-196.

That's a lot of information, but you're familiar with some of it already, and the concepts are pretty concrete. Learn the principles and practice using them as you draft your body ¶ DRAFT.

We'll cover the material, quickly I hope, when we return next week.

Just as I didn't follow everything Degen said about TH, I don't follow or even endorse everything he says about the new writing concepts. He likes fluffy, overblown writing in a way I and most college professors don't; and he favors a general way of thinking and writing that I and college professors don't. I want you to be specific, precise, and concrete, to think from evidence in a way Degen doesn't. I want you to show your thinking more fully and precisely than his models show.

But the writing 101 concepts he covers are solid and the stuff of good witing here and everywhere. Learn them and empower your writing. Forever.

Also begin reviewing and learning Crime and Punishment vocab. list 2, linked in the middle column under Crime and Punishment vocab lists. We'll have a quiz the week after next. You'd be smart to review the words and to learn them as you read. The practice for list 2 is due Friday, September 8 by 22:59 for a participation grade.

See the newly revised Crime and Punishment essay assignment. I've specified and focused it some, while still allowing wide latitude of exact topic and approach. I hope I've guided you more clearly, not stifled your interest or creativity.

Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 2 and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here.

 

 

Tuesday

 

 

 

 

 

No classes. today.

Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 2 and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here.

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

 

 

 

No classes. today.

Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 2 and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here.

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

No classes today.

Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 2 and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here.

 

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

 

No classes today.

Bring Crime and Punishment, Degen, and Trimble to class on Tuesday.

Crime and Punishment quiz Part 2 on Tuesday. You'll need your iPad.

Be reading Crime and Punishment Part 2 and tracking your repeated element and reading thematically. Read about theme here.

Assignments due

Hiroshige,_Sudden_shower_over_Shin-œhashi_bridge_and_Atake,_1857

 

Tuesday, September 5. Quiz over Crime and Punishment Part 2. I've asked you to begin reading with a purpose and to track a repeated element you find interesting and to collect evidence. The quiz will ask you to tell me about that something in Part 2 in ¶ form. Have some evidence prepared and be ready to show me your thinking.

Friday, September 8 by 8 am. Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT. Use the thesis you wrote to develop a series of topic sentences. Choose one of those topic sentences and write one body ¶. Focus on the writing concepts we have studied: TS, E, P1, A1, A2, A3, T1, B1, B2, B3. Include your thesis above the body ¶. You will upload this draft to peergrade assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT by 8am Friday. A participation grade counting upload, feedback, and responding to feedback.

Friday, September 8 by 23:59. Completion of Crime and Punishment vocab. list 2 practice at vocabulary.com. A participation grade.

Monday, September 11. Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL. Paper copy in class, upload to assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ FINAL at both peergrade and turnitin by 15:30. See Essay submission on the policy page for details. Follow MLA format for heading, citations, and works cited page; and use only Times New Roman font.

 

 

Crime and Punishment essay

One of the most frequent and telling patterns in literature is repetition. Repetition clues us into what the author wants us to notice, what he or she thinks matters. As you continue to read Crime and Punishment, note some repeated element. You might see a word, an image, a character's repeated action or thought, a setting, an allusion, a theme. See the list on page 94 in Degen. He lists some questions for each category, but don't be limited to them. Follow your own thinking and interests. Let your interest drive your thinking and writing. Remember the questions I asked you to write last week? Read this about asking good questions. And remember that literature shows you human truth.

You will devise your own topic by choosing one repeated element you find interesting, and over time discovering an interesting and insightful way of thinking about the repeated element. You will then define a way of organizing the essay, perhaps from those found in option two on pages 95-103 in Degen.

As you read the novel, record telling evidence about your repeated element, and do so in some organized way—front/back of your book; on paper; a doc; or using post-it notes or colored tabs. Notice what the novel's showing you about your element, what questions it prompts you to ask, what answers it offers. On each note record the questions you ask or the relevance you see to your category and cross reference examples as you go. The more you read, the more you should begin to find interesting questions and to enrich and clarify your thinking.

Read and think thematically. Here's a good introduction to theme. You will eventually link your repeated element to theme.

The patterns you discover and the questions you ask will lead you to an interesting thesis

We'll finalize your topic and thesis later, in conference.

For this and all writing assignments, do no Googling or other research. Develop your own thinking and writing, your own ability to create a point of view. Use nothing other than your book, your class notes, and your own mind.

 

 

Crime and Punishment
reading schedule

Due September 5: Part 2, pages 89-193: 105 pp, 21 days
Due September 11: Part 3, pages 197-278: 82 pp, 7 days
Due September 18: Part 4, pages 281-358: 78 pp, 7 days
Due September 25: Part 5, pages 361-436: 76 pp, 7 days
Due October 2: Part 6, pages 439-551: 113 pp, 7 days

 

 

Crime and Punishment vocab lists

Crime and Punishment Part 1 list
Crime and Punishment Part 2 list
zipgrade student ids

 

 

Essay documents

Grading notes

Essay editing marks, with explanations

See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight

LBH sentence crafting packet

LBH punctuation packet

Essay rubric, technical

Essay rubric, conceptual

Asking good questions

MLA style center

 

 

Biology of human behavior
Robert Sapolsky

Crime and Punishment
reading links

Character list

Chronology of Part 1 and map of Petersburg

Sample annotated opening pages

What C & P can teach you that the internet can't

Archbishop Rowan Williams on Dostoevsky

Raskolnikov's St. Petersburg, map of his travels

Articles on Crime and Punishment

Dostoevsky's empathy

Kenosis

 

 

Are humans natural-born killers?

"Our violence operates far outside the bounds of any other species. Human beings kill anything. Slaughter is a defining behavior of our species. We kill all other creatures, and we kill our own. Read today's paper. Read yesterday's, or read tomorrow's. The enormous industry of print and broadcast journalism serves predominantly to document our killing. Violence exists in the animal world, of course, but on a far different scale. Carnivores kill for food; we kill our family members, our children, our parents, our spouses, our brothers and sisters, our cousins and in-laws. We kill strangers. We kill people who are different from us, in appearance, beliefs, race, and social status. We kill ourselves in suicide. We kill for advantage and for revenge, we kill for entertainment: the Roman Coliseum, drive-by shootings, bullfights, hunting and fishing, animal roadkill in an instantaneous reflex for sport. We kill friends, rivals, coworkers, and classmates. Children kill children, in school and on the playground. Grandparents, parents, fathers, mothers—all kill and all of them are the targets of killing."

 

 

On Dostoevsky
Vladimir Nabokov

"In the light of the historical development of artistic vision, Dostoyevsky is a very fascinating phenomenon. If you examine closely any of his works, say ''The Brothers Karamazov,'' you will note that the natural background and all things relevant to the perception of the senses hardly exist. What landscape there is is a landscape of ideas, a moral landscape. The weather does not exist in his world, so it does not much matter how people dress. Dostoyevsky characterizes his people through situation, through ethical matters, their psychological reactions, their inside ripples. After describing the looks of a character, he uses the old-fashioned device of not referring to his specific physical appearance anymore in the scenes with him. This is not the way of an artist - say Tolstoy— who sees his character in his mind all the time and knows exactly the specific gesture he will employ at this or that moment. But there is something more striking still about Dostoyevsky. He seems to have been chosen by the destiny of Russian letters to become Russia's greatest playwright, but he took the wrong turning and wrote novels. The novel ''The Brothers Karamazov'' has always seemed to me a straggling play, with just that amount of furniture and other implements needed for the various actors: a round table with the wet, round trace of a glass, a window painted yellow to make it look as if there were sunlight outside, or a shrub hastily brought in and plumped down by a stagehand.
     "Let me refer to one more method of dealing with literature - and this is the simplest and perhaps most important one. If you hate a book, you still may derive artistic delight from imagining other and better ways of looking at things, or, what is the same, expressing things, than the author you hate does. The mediocre, the false, the poshlost* -can at least afford a mischievous but very healthy pleasure, as you stamp and groan through a second-rate book which has been awarded a prize. But the books you like must also be read with shudders and gasps. Let me submit the following practical suggestion. Literature, real literature, must not be gulped down like some potion which may be good for the heart or good for the brain - the brain, that stomach of the soul. Literature must be taken and broken to bits, pulled apart, squashed -then its lovely reek will be smelt in the hollow of the palm, it will be munched and rolled upon the tongue with relish; then, and only then, its rare flavor will be appreciated at its true worth and the broken and crushed parts will again come together in your mind and disclose the beauty of a unity to which you have contributed something of your own blood."

 

 

Empthy versus sympathy

"In 1909, the psychologist Edward Titchener translated the German Einfhlung ('feeling into') into English as empathy. Empathy can be defined as a person's ability to recognize and share the emotions of another person, fictional character, or sentient being. It involves, first, seeing someone else's situation from his perspective, and, second, sharing his emotions, including, if any, his distress.
     "For me to share in someone else's perspective, I must do more than merely put myself into his position. Instead, I must imagine myself as him, and, more than that, imagine myself as him in the particular situation in which he finds himself. I cannot empathize with an abstract or detached feeling. To empathize with a particular person, I need to have at least some knowledge of who he is and what he is doing or trying to do. As John Steinbeck wrote, 'It means very little to know that a million Chinese are starving unless you know one Chinese who is starving.'
     "Empathy is often confused with pity, sympathy, and compassion, which are each reactions to the plight of others. Pity is a feeling of discomfort at the distress of one or more sentient beings, and often has paternalistic or condescending overtones. Implicit in the notion of pity is that its object does not deserve its plight, and, moreover, is unable to prevent, reverse, or overturn it. Pity is less engaged than empathy, sympathy, or compassion, amounting to little more than a conscious acknowledgement of the plight of its object."

August 21-25

Monday

 

 

 

 

 

Return summer worksheets. About the assignment, any good? Explain grading and thinking.

Introduce Crime and Punishment essay.

Record your zipgrade student id.

Thesis sentences, how they work. Bring Degen and Crime and Punishment. Degen 94-103.

By the end of today you should know what a thesis is and how one is made and how Aristotle's topics can help you think about a topic and organize an essay.

Be reading Crime and Punishment.

For Thursday, revise your thesis sentence after your improving understanding and skills. Follow the "formula." The goal is not a perfect thesis but an improved one. You're learning how to do.

Always feel welcomed to come by my office for a conference. Here's my schedule, which is also posted under Office on the policy page.

 

 

Tuesday

 

 

 

 

 

Bring Degen and Crime and Punishment.

We'll continue learning about thesis sentences. Degen 224-25.

Study for vocab. quiz Crime and Punishment Part 1 tomorrow. Definitions and sentences.

For Thursday, revise your thesis sentence after your improving understanding and skills. Follow the "formula." The goal is not a perfect thesis but an improved one. You're learning how to do.

That revised sentence due to peergrade assignment Crime and Punishment thesis for workshop by 8am Thursday. A participation grade. Remove your name from the doc.

Be reading Crime and Punishment.

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vocab. quiz Crime and Punishment Part 1 today.

Be reading Crime and Punishment.

For Thursday, revise your thesis sentence after your improving understanding and skills. Follow the "formula." The goal is not a perfect thesis but an improved one. You're learning how to do.

That revised sentence due to peergrade assignment Crime and Punishment thesis for workshop by 8am Thursday. A participation grade. Remove your name from the doc.

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thesis workshop. Your revised Crime and Punishment thesis due to peergrade assignment Crime and Punishment thesis for workshop by 8am. A participation grade. Remove your name from the doc.

Your peergrade editing is due by Saturday 22:00. A participation grade.

Bring Degen and Crime and Punishment to class. You will use them.

Be reading Crime and Punishment.

 

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continued thesis workshop. By the end of class today you should have a vastly improved thesis and an improved understanding of what a thesis is, how it works, and how to craft one.

Your peergrade editing and comment evaluation are due by Saturday 22:00. Each a participation grade.

As you read the comments on your thesis, respond to them. Peergrade offers ways to have enriching conversations with your editors. Do. Flag comments as helpful, or not, and add feedback reaction. A paricipation grade.

Read these two posts on the peergrade website: Viewing your feedback and Feedback reaction.

For Monday, read Degen 18-22 and Trimble (Writing with Style) chapter 2, pages 12-22. We'll begin devloping an analytical voice and review some getting started basics.

Bring Degen, Trimble, and Crime and Punishment to class.

Be reading Crime and Punishment.

Assignments due

Thursday, August 24 by 8am. Your revised thesis sentence uploaded to peergrade assignment Crime and Punishment thesis for workshop. A participation grade. Peergrade hand-in closes at 8am. Remove your name from the doc.

Saturday, August 26 by 22:00. Peergrade thesis editing and comment evaluation. Each a participation grade.

Tuesday, September 5. Quiz over Crime and Punishment Part 2. I've asked you to begin reading with a purpose and track something you find interesting and to collect evidence. The quiz will ask you to tell me about that something in Part 2 in ¶ form. Have some evidence prepared and be ready to show me your thinking.

Wednesday, September 6. Crime and Punishment body ¶ draft. Use the thesis you wrote to develop a series of topic sentences. Focus on topic sentence (TS); developing your analytical voice and LTR; and blending of evidence (B). Include your thesis above the body ¶. You will upload this draft to peergrade assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ DRAFT by 8am Tuesday. A participation grade counting upload, feedback, and responding to feedback.

Wednesday, August 23. Crime and Punishment vocab. list Part 1. Definitions and sentences from the novel.

 

 

Crime and Punishment essay

One of the most frequent and telling patterns in literature is repetition. Repetition clues us into what the author wants us to notice, what he or she thinks matters. As you continue to read Crime and Punishment, note some repeating element. You might see a word, an image, a character's repeated action or thought, a setting, an allusion, a theme. See the list on page 94 in Degen. He lists some questions for each category, but don't be limited to them. Follow your own thinking and interests. Let your interest drive your thinking and writing. Remember the questions I asked you to write last week? Read this about asking good questions.

You will devise your own topic by choosing one repeated element you find interesting, and over time discovering an interesting and insightful way of thinking about the repeated element. You will then define a way of organizing the essay, perhaps from those found in option two on pages 95-103 in Degen.

As you read the novel, record telling evidence about your repeated element, and do so in some organized way—front/back of your book; on paper; a doc; or using post-it notes or colored tabs. Notice what the novel's showing you about your element, what questions it prompts you to ask, what answers it offers. On each note record the questions you ask or the relevance you see to your category and cross reference examples as you go. The more you read, the more you should begin to find interesting questions and to enrich and clarify your thinking.

Read and think thematically. Here's a good introduction to theme. You will eventually link your repeated element to theme.

The patterns you discover and the questions you ask will lead you to an interesting thesis

We'll finalize your topic and thesis later, in conference.

For this and all writing assignments, do no Googling or other research. Develop your own thinking and writing, your own ability to create a point of view. Use nothing other than your book, your class notes, and your own mind.

 

 

Crime and Punishment
reading schedule

Due September 5: Part 2, pages 89-193: 105 pp, 21 days
Due September 11: Part 3, pages 197-278: 82 pp, 7 days
Due September 18: Part 4, pages 281-358: 78 pp, 7 days
Due September 25: Part 5, pages 361-436: 76 pp, 7 days
Due October 2: Part 6, pages 439-551: 113 pp, 7 days

 

 

Crime and Punishment vocab lists

Crime and Punishment Part 1 list
Crime and Punishment Part 2 list
zipgrade student ids

 

 

The books you need now

 

 

Essay documents

Grading notes

Essay editing marks, with explanations

See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight

LBH sentence crafting packet

LBH punctuation packet

Essay rubric, technical

Essay rubric, conceptual

Asking good questions

MLA style center

 

 

Dostoevsky biography
from The School of Life

Crime and Punishment
reading links

Character list

Chronology of Part 1 and map of Petersburg

Sample annotated opening pages

What C & P can teach you that the internet can't

Archbishop Rowan Williams on Dostoevsky

Raskolnikov's St. Petersburg, map of his travels

Articles on Crime and Punishment

Dostoevsky's empathy

Kenosis

 

 

Are humans natural-born killers?

"Our violence operates far outside the bounds of any other species. Human beings kill anything. Slaughter is a defining behavior of our species. We kill all other creatures, and we kill our own. Read today's paper. Read yesterday's, or read tomorrow's. The enormous industry of print and broadcast journalism serves predominantly to document our killing. Violence exists in the animal world, of course, but on a far different scale. Carnivores kill for food; we kill our family members, our children, our parents, our spouses, our brothers and sisters, our cousins and in-laws. We kill strangers. We kill people who are different from us, in appearance, beliefs, race, and social status. We kill ourselves in suicide. We kill for advantage and for revenge, we kill for entertainment: the Roman Coliseum, drive-by shootings, bullfights, hunting and fishing, animal roadkill in an instantaneous reflex for sport. We kill friends, rivals, coworkers, and classmates. Children kill children, in school and on the playground. Grandparents, parents, fathers, mothers—all kill and all of them are the targets of killing."

 

 

On Dostoevsky
Vladimir Nabokov

"In the light of the historical development of artistic vision, Dostoyevsky is a very fascinating phenomenon. If you examine closely any of his works, say ''The Brothers Karamazov,'' you will note that the natural background and all things relevant to the perception of the senses hardly exist. What landscape there is is a landscape of ideas, a moral landscape. The weather does not exist in his world, so it does not much matter how people dress. Dostoyevsky characterizes his people through situation, through ethical matters, their psychological reactions, their inside ripples. After describing the looks of a character, he uses the old-fashioned device of not referring to his specific physical appearance anymore in the scenes with him. This is not the way of an artist - say Tolstoy— who sees his character in his mind all the time and knows exactly the specific gesture he will employ at this or that moment. But there is something more striking still about Dostoyevsky. He seems to have been chosen by the destiny of Russian letters to become Russia's greatest playwright, but he took the wrong turning and wrote novels. The novel ''The Brothers Karamazov'' has always seemed to me a straggling play, with just that amount of furniture and other implements needed for the various actors: a round table with the wet, round trace of a glass, a window painted yellow to make it look as if there were sunlight outside, or a shrub hastily brought in and plumped down by a stagehand.
     "Let me refer to one more method of dealing with literature - and this is the simplest and perhaps most important one. If you hate a book, you still may derive artistic delight from imagining other and better ways of looking at things, or, what is the same, expressing things, than the author you hate does. The mediocre, the false, the poshlost* -can at least afford a mischievous but very healthy pleasure, as you stamp and groan through a second-rate book which has been awarded a prize. But the books you like must also be read with shudders and gasps. Let me submit the following practical suggestion. Literature, real literature, must not be gulped down like some potion which may be good for the heart or good for the brain - the brain, that stomach of the soul. Literature must be taken and broken to bits, pulled apart, squashed -then its lovely reek will be smelt in the hollow of the palm, it will be munched and rolled upon the tongue with relish; then, and only then, its rare flavor will be appreciated at its true worth and the broken and crushed parts will again come together in your mind and disclose the beauty of a unity to which you have contributed something of your own blood."

 

 

Empthy versus sympathy

"In 1909, the psychologist Edward Titchener translated the German Einfhlung ('feeling into') into English as empathy. Empathy can be defined as a person's ability to recognize and share the emotions of another person, fictional character, or sentient being. It involves, first, seeing someone else's situation from his perspective, and, second, sharing his emotions, including, if any, his distress.
     "For me to share in someone else's perspective, I must do more than merely put myself into his position. Instead, I must imagine myself as him, and, more than that, imagine myself as him in the particular situation in which he finds himself. I cannot empathize with an abstract or detached feeling. To empathize with a particular person, I need to have at least some knowledge of who he is and what he is doing or trying to do. As John Steinbeck wrote, 'It means very little to know that a million Chinese are starving unless you know one Chinese who is starving.'
     "Empathy is often confused with pity, sympathy, and compassion, which are each reactions to the plight of others. Pity is a feeling of discomfort at the distress of one or more sentient beings, and often has paternalistic or condescending overtones. Implicit in the notion of pity is that its object does not deserve its plight, and, moreover, is unable to prevent, reverse, or overturn it. Pity is less engaged than empathy, sympathy, or compassion, amounting to little more than a conscious acknowledgement of the plight of its object."

August 16-18

Monday

 

 

 

 

 

No classes.

 

 

Tuesday

 

 

 

 

 

No classes.

 

 

Wednesday

 

 

 

 

 

Hello and welcome.

Signup for turnitin.com English 4 2018. Class id 15830872, enrollment key: jesuit. Use your last name, first name and ONLY your mail.strakejesuit email.

Sign up for English 4 2018 course at peergrade. Use this course code: P4X4Q4. Use your last name, first name and ONLY your mail.strakejesuit email.

Sign up for vocabulary.com

Make sure you have Google Drive, Google Docs, Google Spreadsheets, Google Chrome, and Socrative student installed on your iPad.

Scroll through the website to familiarize yourself with its offerings.

Read the policy page in full and in detail to learn my guiding rules.

Have Degen ready to go for Monday.

Summer worksheets due tomorrow. Bring them to class, along with your copy of Crime and Punishment. One change: you have written a thesis, yes; but now I want you also to write the question your thesis tries to answer. Write that question in the box with your thesis.

Print, read, and annotate this article by Chinua Achebe about why we read literature. It's one of the best statements I know.

And print, read, and annotate this article by David Mikics.

Of those articles, the Achebe is by far the more important.

 

 

Thursday

 

 

 

 

 

Website review, policy conclusion.

Why you should read literature. Achebe article, Mikics article.

Bring your annotated copies and your annotated copy of Crime and Punishment.

I will often check your annotations of reading for quiz grades.

Summer reading worksheets due.

We'll begin/continue our discussion of Crime and Punishment and how to read more deeply.

 

 

Friday

 

 

 

 

 

And so we begin Crime and Punishment.

You'll need Degen over the weekend. We'll begin learning some ways literature makes meaning. Bring Degen to class on Monday. We'll talk thesis, then do some thesis workshop.

Have Trimble, Writing with Style ready to go next week, too.

Are you keeping up with Crime and Punishment?

Crime and Punishment
reading links

Character list

Chronology of Part 1 and map of Petersburg

Sample annotated opening pages

What C & P can teach you that the internet can't

Archbishop Rowan Williams on Dostoevsky

Raskolnikov's St. Petersburg, map of his travels

Articles on Crime and Punishment

Dostoevsky's empathy

Kenosis

 

 

You are the product
John Lanchester

"Girard was a Christian, and his view of human nature is that it is fallen. We don't know what we want or who we are; we dont really have values and beliefs of our own; what we have instead is an instinct to copy and compare. We are homo mimeticus. 'Man is the creature who does not know what to desire, and who turns to others in order to make up his mind. We desire what others desire because we imitate their desires.' Look around, ye petty, and compare. The reason Thiel latched onto Facebook with such alacrity was that he saw in it for the first time a business that was Girardian to its core: built on people's deep need to copy.' Facebook first spread by word of mouth, and it's about word of mouth, so it's doubly mimetic,' Thiel said. 'Social media proved to be more important than it looked, because its about our natures.' We are keen to be seen as we want to be seen, and Facebook is the most popular tool humanity has ever had with which to do that.
     "The view of human nature implied by these ideas is pretty dark. If all people want to do is go and look at other people so that they can compare themselves to them and copy what they want—if that is the final, deepest truth about humanity and its motivations—then Facebook doesn't really have to take too much trouble over humanity's welfare, since all the bad things that happen to us are things we are doing to ourselves. For all the corporate uplift of its mission statement, Facebook is a company whose essential premise is misanthropic. It is perhaps for that reason that Facebook, more than any other company of its size, has a thread of malignity running through its story. The high-profile, tabloid version of this has come in the form of incidents such as the live-streaming of rapes, suicides, murders and cop-killings. But this is one of the areas where Facebook seems to me relatively blameless. People live-stream these terrible things over the site because it has the biggest audience; if Snapchat or Periscope were bigger, they'd be doing it there instead."
                                                                     full article here

 

 

 

 

Why novels and not movies
A Soviet film version of
Crime and Punishment

Assignments due

Thursday, August 17. Summer reading worksheets due in class. See late work on the policy page.

Monday, August 28. Crime and Punishment body ¶ due. Paper in class, upload to both turnitin and peergrade assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ by 3:30 pm. When uploading to peergrade, remove your name from the MLA heading and save as pdf. See essay format requirements under Essay submission on the policy page.

Tuesday, September 5. Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION. Paper in class, upload to turnitin assignment Crime and Punishment body ¶ REVISION by 3:30 pm.

Vocabulary quizzes will be a little different from previous years: we will no longer use a vocabulary book and there is no longer a regularly scheduled vocabulary quiz. Instead I will be selecting words periodically from the texts we read that I think you need to know to be a part of civilization and that will enhance your understanding of, say, a character in one of the texts we're reading. So vocabulary, if we do it right, will seem less contrived this year, and—here's the important part—some of the words might actually stick.

Wednesday, August 23. Crime and Punishment vocab. list Part 1.

 

 

Crime and Punishment
reading schedule

Due September 5: Part 2, pages 89-193: 105 pp, 21 days
Due September 11: Part 3, pages 197-278: 82 pp, 7 days
Due September 18: Part 4, pages 281-358: 78 pp, 7 days
Due September 25: Part 5, pages 361-436: 76 pp, 7 days
Due October 2: Part 6, pages 439-551: 113 pp, 7 days

 

 

The books you need now

 

Essay documents

Grading notes

Essay editing marks, with explanations

See writing page for tips, models, instruction, delight

LBH sentence crafting packet

LBH punctuation packet

Essay rubric, technical

Essay rubric, conceptual

General essay rubric

Asking good questions

MLA style center

 

 

Why creativity demands uncertainty

 


How We Experience the Meaning
We Create

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Why novels and not the internet?
David Mikics

"Novels deliver the unlike, the alien, as an antidote to our comforts and our day-to-day prejudices. Increasingly, we are snugly wrapped in our worldviews. Conservatives see everything in blue, progressives in red. The internet seems designed to back up our opinions, because when we're online we make a habit of seeking out the like-minded. We gang up on those we disagree with, rather than listening carefully to contrary opinions. When the web shows us the horrors of war and domestic violence, we take a quick look and move on. Distracted by snapshots of horror, we think we are following terrible events. But we're not, because we don't commit ourselves to finding out about the human actors behind them. Reading a novel means committing yourself, to the author and the characters. Glancing at evil and tragedy, as the internet encourages us to do, lets us avoid the hard questions about motivation and human personality that novels make us confront. " full article here